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3D Printing Executive Overview

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Executive Overview and backgrounder on 3D Printing / Additive Manufacturing. Table of Contents: - First Industrial Revolution 3
- Enter: 3D Printing 5
- Skilled Labor 10
- Energy Efficiency 12
- The Perfect Storm 13
- History of Additive Fabrication 14
- Military Applications 20
- Consumer Grade 23
- Case Study: Kraftwurx / Digital Reality 25
- Online 3D Printing Services 29
- Industrial 3D Printing Hardware 33
- Edge Manufacturing 31
- Industrial 3D Printed Parts & Items 33
- Digital Rights Management Issues 37
- Future Developments 41
- Summary & Conclusions 45

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3D Printing Executive Overview

  1. 1. STRATEGIC WHITE PAPER 3D PRINTING TAKEAWAYS 3D PRINTING EXECUTIVE • It is the “Next Industrial Revolution” OVERVIEW by Chris Norman • It Will Redefine The Supply Chain and Patrick Seaman January 2013 • It is a Concept that is “Bigger than the Web”Pepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 1
  2. 2. Topics in this White Paper  First Industrial Revolution 3  Online 3D Printing Services 29  Enter: 3D Printing 5  Industrial 3D Printing Hardware 33  Skilled Labor 10  Edge Manufacturing 31  Energy and Materials Efficiency 12  Industrial 3D Printed Parts & Items 33  The Perfect Storm 13  Digital Rights Management Issues 37  History of Additive Fabrication 14  Future Developments 41  Military Applications 20  Summary & Conclusions 45  Consumer Applications 23  References 50  Case Study: Kraftwurx / Digital Reality 25  About the Authors 51  About Pepperwood Partners 53Pepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 2
  3. 3. First Industrial Revolution Henry Ford established the model for the mass- manufacturing era of the Industrial Revolution when he created the assembly line. The assembly line promised to make products more affordable by producing many copies of identical parts. Most everything consumers buy today is produced in this manner, using large factories with lots of expensive machines and people to run them.Pepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 3
  4. 4. First Industrial Revolution Products made in this manner are distributed to you through an enormously complicated global supply chain created to distribute the produced goods to far-away consumers. Global mass-manufacturing factories are spread across Asia, sending a never-ending stream of giant container ships to North American and European consumer markets. This complicated infrastructure stemmed from businesses chasing lower operating and labor costs, to bring products to you.Pepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 4
  5. 5. Enter: 3D Printing Additive Fabrication or, as it has become more affectionately known by the public, 3D printing, recreates an object layer-by-layer. Using a 3-dimensional digital model (CAD model) as the “blueprint,” successive layers of material are precisely deposited by a computer controlled “printer”. The result is a precise “copy” of the object.Pepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 5
  6. 6. Enter: 3D Printing The Economist asks, is this “the PC all over again?” Machines that turn digital objects (bits) into physical objects are “Pioneering a whole new way of making things – one that could rewrite the rules of manufacturing in much the same way that the PC laid waste to traditional computing.” 1Pepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 6
  7. 7. Enter: 3D Printing Today’s 3D Printing technologies make use of a wide variety of materials including plastics, metals, ceramics and even biological materials. Some companies are experimenting with composite materials such as combining plastic and cellulose for a wood-like result. By using multiple print heads, different materials can be deposited at different stages, changing the Figure 2: 3D Printed Turbine Engine (© Kraftwurx) characteristics of the object. Research about 3D Printing at major universities and private companies focuses primarily on materials. Attempts to print virtually everything are under way, including food products like chocolate or sugar.Pepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 7
  8. 8. Enter: 3D Printing On that larger scale, there are efforts to 3D Print with concrete, with the potential to “print” a house in hours or days . Supported by USC, the US Military & NASA, this concept takes the 3D Printing concept to a new paradigm in both scale and utility. Figure 3: 3D Print a house (© Contour Construction)Pepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 8
  9. 9. Enter: 3D Printing (of 3D Printers) “They represent the next industrial revolution… It will be bigger than the web.” -- Chris Anderson, Former Editor-in-Chief of Wired MagazinePepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 9
  10. 10. Skilled Labor Although much hyped, 3D Printing has the potential to create the “perfect storm” for manufacturing. What used to require a highly skilled machinist with a deep background in many complex methods and techniques has been replaced by a computer controlled machine. Following the basic tenet of the Industrial Revolution, removing the skilled labor needed to operate the machine to produce one-at-a-time items, removes much of the barrier to produce that item at affordable price points.Pepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 10
  11. 11. Skilled Labor Often, a machinist cannot complete a part that has complex geometry without manipulating the object – such as flipping the part or object over to machine the other side. 3D Printing eliminates this burden because it removes the penalties of the complexity of a part by creating an object layer by layer. 3D Printers allow working assemblies to be printed with built-in hinges and other features. Parts can be combined in ways that traditional machining cannot accomplish, reducing part count in an assembled product. Consider the example of a ship in a bottle: A 3D Printer can build this easily whereas a traditional machine cannot.Pepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 11
  12. 12. Energy and Materials Efficiency 3D Printing is an efficient manufacturing process. In contrast, traditional manufacturing is not. For example, machining / milling uses blocks of metal that will be machined; removing large portions of the block result in the desired part. An analogy to this would be how a sculptor chips away marble to create a statue. The chips, which also took energy to form, become scrap. Figure 4: Traditional machining / milling is inefficient In this example, the scrap metal must be shipped back, re-smelted, and shipped out again, repeating the cycle. In contrast, 3D Printing adds material, building-up the part layer by layer. Not only does this save material, but it also saves energy because the machine only uses the energy necessary to form the part, nothing more.Pepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 12
  13. 13. The Perfect Storm Suppose that a set of presentations and reports needed to be delivered to multiple locations around the country. By sending the electronic files to a service like Office Depot®, FedEx Office®, or Staples®, exact duplicates of the documents, including color, number of pages, binding methods, etc., are produced and delivered. In the same way, sending the electronic files for Staples and Mcor have an object will result in the identical part or announced a new store- product being made, regardless of printer pickup based location. Note that Staples® has 3-D printing service announced that it will begin a project to called Staples Easy 3D add 3D Printing services to its stores5.Pepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 13
  14. 14. History of Additive Fabrication “That allows designers to create both intricate internal structures to develop extremely strong parts …. For those very reasons the Navy is already using “a number of printed parts such as air ducts” in F/A-18s.” -- United States Naval InstitutePepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 14
  15. 15. History of Additive Fabrication 3D Printing is arguably one of the least promoted revolutionary technologies of all time. After 3D Printing was invented in the early 1980’s, it was adopted by the aerospace industry to create prototypes. The fledgling industry became known as Rapid Prototyping due to its speed and ease of use. Later, the technology was adopted to create cast titanium parts for fighter jets including the FA-18 Super Hornet and later the F22 Raptor.Pepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 15
  16. 16. History of Additive Fabrication While first coined in the 1990’s, the term “3D Printing” was not widely used until around 2008, as marketing and the public began to embrace the technology. Other related terms used to describe the technology include: • Direct Digital Manufacturing • Additive Manufacturing • Additive Free-form Fabrication • Solid Freeform Fabrication • Rapid Prototyping • Layered manufacturingPepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 16
  17. 17. History of Additive Fabrication By the 2000’s, the technology had expanded well past prototyping parts. Research on the technology began to explore “Bio-Printing,” 3D Printing of biological materials such as blood vessels and experimental human organ components. This technology is still in early stages and most likely years from FDA approval in the United States. Blood vessels, orthodontic implants, Figure 5: Developing: Printing Human Organs (© BBC) bone replacements, and other Surgeon Anthony Atala successfully simpler structures are becoming implanted an “engineered” 3D Printed more common in 3D Printing. To bladder into patient Luke Massella . date, there is at least one well documented organ implantation.Pepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 17
  18. 18. History of Additive Fabrication Just as in the computer revolution, equipment that used to cost hundreds of thousands of dollars and could only be afforded by large organizations has evolved into an ecosystem ranging from the industrial grade high end all the way down to consumer-grade desktop models costing a few hundred dollars. Analogous to higher dots- per-inch in ink or toner printers, the Figure : Industrial 3D Printer (© 3D Systems) more expensive 3D Printers will create objects with higher Cheaper 3D Printers will generally resolution, often with multiple or create objects with rougher edges difficult to use materials. and use cheaper raw materials.Pepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 18
  19. 19. History of Additive Fabrication In addition to the uses described Manufacturers around the globe above, the technology of 3D utilize 3D Printing and related Printing is now used to create equipment to produce everything everything from custom prosthetic from oil field parts to jet engine limbs12 to automobile components to components to an ever-expanding aerial drones13 to custom gold and array of custom devices and components. silver jewelry. The US Army is testing 3D Printers14,15,16 with the idea to construct spare parts and components near the front lines, reducing the supply chain from weeks or even months, to days or hours. Illustration: 3D Printed prosthetic limbPepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 19
  20. 20. Military Applications Imagine that an Army tank breaks down and the nearest replacement part is misfiled at a supply depot, located somewhere in an endless sea of shipping containers. The next closest replacement part is thousands of miles away. This particular solution is already A 3D Manufacturing network could commercially available through analyze the part, its destination, software created by Kraftwurx materials, and other factors parent company Digital Reality. That required to produce the part and software, dubbed Digital Factory™ find an appropriate 3D Printing is currently being used for facility in a nearby NATO country distributed Edge Manufacturing of and deliver it within a day. This is consumer goods. Edge Manufacturing.Pepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 20
  21. 21. Military Applications On Military Adoption of 3D Printing: "With the right systems engineering, the remaining barriers for adoption can be removed so that out-of-stock parts can be deployed to units in the field well ahead of the current supply chain. It will make it easier for military units to accomplish their missions. For fiscal year 2011, the Operation & Maintenance portion of the DoDs total budget request comprises $283.1 billion. If these costs could be reduced by one-tenth of one percent, that would account for $283 million in savings. " -- James Barkley, MITREPepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 21
  22. 22. Military Applications “The ability to replicate part quickly and cheaply is a huge benefit to the warfighter. Instead of needing a massive manufacturing logistics chain, a device that generates replacement parts is now small and light enough to be easily carried in a backpack or on a truck.” -- D Shannon Berry, Future Warfare OfficePepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 22
  23. 23. Consumer Applications In recent years, the technology has found a home in the hobby market. These less capable but intriguing consumer-grade and DIY 3D Printers retail for several hundred to a few thousand dollars. The consumer grade equipment has garnered much press coverage and a cottage industry of artisan created figurines, toys, jewelry and art. Leading Figure 7: Makerbot consumer-grade 3D Printer the pack of the consumer 3D Printer hardware vendors is Makerbot, with competitors including 3D Systems’s low- end Cube, Solidoodle, uPrint, and many more.Pepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 23
  24. 24. Consumer Applications These consumer grade machines have limited capabilities and are considered hobby grade equipment. However, the quality difference between the low cost machines and the high cost machines is narrowing. Although the consumer market is the hottest segment seeing growth, it is by far substantially lower in total revenue and accounts for a small fraction of the total industry, relegating it to hobbyist use.Pepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 24
  25. 25. Case Study: Kraftwurx / Digital Reality Digital Reality, the parent company to Kraftwurx, first demonstrated their business model in 2006. The company has patents and patents pending branded as Digital Factory™, which is designed to provide sales, manufacturing, and distribution for 3D Printing. This Edge Manufacturing Platform as a Service (PaaS) provides the infrastructure necessary for any company wishing to take advantage of 3D Printing for their own business without spending the millions that some companies have spent to build their own platform. The system can be white labeled, so brands can use it as their own.Pepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 25
  26. 26. Case Study: Kraftwurx / Digital Reality Kraftwurx provides its patented1 Edge Manufacturing network to its customers that includes more than 110 facilities worldwide. When a customer requests that an item be manufactured, the system polls Edge Manufacturers after analyzing the part, material, and end use category. The system then routes the orders to facilities in concentric circles around the customer until the optimal combination of price and time-to-deliver are reached. The item may likely be manufactured in the same city as the customer because it reduces shipping costs and potential customs fees and delays. 1 . US Patent # 13/374,062Pepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 26
  27. 27. Case Study: Kraftwurx / Digital Reality Kraftwurx recently produced two copies of a small product. The first product was made in Houston, Texas, and the information for the second product was It took 3 days to send, print and sent electronically to China. The product made in Houston was physically shipped deliver the product. Production to China. The product arrived 14 days costs were similar but shipping later at a shipping cost of $140.00. was $115 cheaper. Time and When the box was opened, the product money were saved, as well as a was broken, and the box had been few trees as no jet fuel or cargo labeled “opened by customs”. The ships were needed to deliver the second product was produced in China, part. very close to the destination.Pepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 27
  28. 28. Case Study: Kraftwurx / Digital Reality The platform affords small and medium By offering this platform, businesses a means to go to market by Kraftwurx hopes to spur an either investing solely in the design of a industrial revolution and reshape 3D model of a product, or, alternatively, the global economy by equipping outsourcing the design to a growing small businesses to compete network of design professionals. worldwide.Pepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 28
  29. 29. Online 3D Printing Services It is not necessary for professionals or hobbyists to buy and operate their own hardware because PaaS online services can take uploaded 3D designs and print and deliver them. These online services are offered by companies like Kraftwurx, Shapeways and Sculpteo.Pepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 29
  30. 30. Industrial 3D Printing Hardware To get a sense of the growth of the overall 3D Printing market, it is helpful to look at the publicly traded stocks of two of the leading industrial 3D Printing hardware manufacturers, 3D Systems and Stratasys. Also note that in the past two years, 3D Systems acquired rival Z Corp18, and Stratasys merged with Objet19. Figure 9: Growth in 3D Printing Hardware Stocks (source: Yahoo)Pepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 30
  31. 31. Edge Manufacturing Edge Manufacturing is an evolution of the supply chain model, where Manufacturing-On-Demand bureaus, such as those employing 3D Printing, are called upon to manufacture an item due to their proximity to the destination / customer. Note the example of Edge Manufacturing in the Kraftwurx case study, above. The ramifications of Edge Manufacturing are enormous. It will affect the global economy in ways that governments cannot yet fully understand.Pepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 31
  32. 32. Edge Manufacturing For example: The design for an item originates in Texas and is showcased on the internet. A customer in Australia browses and buys the product. While the design for the item is in the USA, the item is Edge Manufactured in Australia, so there are no USA sales taxes, international shipping, or import/customs duties. Suddenly, the US company is competitive in Australia.Pepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 32
  33. 33. Industrial Applications On Industrial 3D Printed Parts and Items: In the US and Europe, many 3D Printing bureaus have been operating the technology for as long as 20 yearsPepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 33
  34. 34. Industrial Applications While consumers are experimenting with entry-level hardware, the industrial applications are mature. In the US and Europe, many 3D printing bureaus have been operating the technology for as long as 20 years. Most are owned or operated by employees of the long forgotten DTM Corporation20, now known as 3D Systems. Many 3D Printing bureaus provide the technology as a service to clients who use it for their own competitive and speed to market advantage. Figure 10: (left to right) Aircraft duct for Boeing 777, Turbine Parts, and Turbine Fuel Injector RingPepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 34
  35. 35. Industrial Applications Examples of industrial parts created with 3D Printing: Figure 11: (left to right) Lightweight aircraft door hinge, Knee implant and 10kt White Gold JewelryPepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 35
  36. 36. Industrial Applications Examples of industrial parts created with 3D Printing: Figure 12: Examples - miscellaneous custom partsPepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 36
  37. 37. Digital Rights Management On Digital Rights Management (DRM) for 3D Printed items: If a 3D “blueprint” can be used to make just about anything, who controls the design? Who profits from it? Who decides?Pepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 37
  38. 38. Digital Rights Management When you consider that “objects” are another form of “content” – something to be used and consumed, the questions of copyright and trademark of the digital blueprint are sure to arise. If a digital blueprint is made of an object, Who controls that design? Who profits from it? If a ‘knock-off’ digital blueprint is made – how do brands prevent copies being 3D Printed that they don’t benefit from or control? Who decides if a 3rd-party digital blueprint is an illegal copy or homage?Pepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 38
  39. 39. Digital Rights Management The traditional manufacturing cycle adds a significant amount of time to the equation, allowing some policing. However, once a brand creates a 3D digital blueprint today, it can be made, well… today. While this opens the door to new DRM challenges, it also changes the life cycle of products. Now brands can potentially create new designs all the time, tying in to current events, trends and fashions on a global daily basis – macro – and also on a micro-geo scale, targeting specific product designs and customizations for micro-targeted campaigns. This can be done without inventory, and without months or year-long manufacturing and transoceanic shipping and national warehousing and distribution cycle.Pepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 39
  40. 40. Digital Rights Management When consumers are given the ability to personalize products themselves, more product diversity and a larger selection of products to choose from emerges, even with branding. Consumers suddenly drive their own designs and create new trends. If brands cannot ultimately turn these new capabilities to their advantage against copyright violators, then perhaps these brands are destined for the scrapheap of obsolescence along with buggy whips and VCRs.Pepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 40
  41. 41. Future Developments Just as the industrial revolution brought huge societal changes, what happens when we no longer need factories and the people that run them? What happens when machines build the machines?Pepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 41
  42. 42. Future Developments 3D Printing is the first step toward a major shift in society. Companies like Nanorex have created Computer software called Nano Engineer™, which allows for precise control of building objects at the atomic level. The control of materials at this scale sets the stage for something right out of Star Trek! Illustration: Molecular level fabricationPepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 42
  43. 43. Future Developments Scientists in the Joint Quantum Institute (JQI) at the University of Maryland and the University of Michigan have announced they have successfully teleported light. The next step is to teleport entire atoms…eventually! The 3D Printer may become the replicator from Star Trek, producing items from stored patterns (computer files). Eventually, you may very well be able to print anything you want at home. What will become of a society when we no longer need factories and employees to Illustration: “Star Trek Fabricator” create the things we need and want? © ParamountPepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 43
  44. 44. Future Developments Aldous Huxley wrote ‘A Brave New World’ in 1931. What Brave New World will the 3D Printing Revolution bring?Pepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 44
  45. 45. Summary & Conclusions 3D Printing will ultimately change the way that products are designed, manufactured, and shared. “Edge Manufacturing” will create new markets and transform (turn upside down) the global supply chain. In the 1980’s, Just-In-Time Manufacturing transformed manufacturing. 3D Printing takes the idea even further with Edge Manufacturing. More products will be made Just-As-Needed, manufactured only when they are actually ordered, and will be manufactured geographically close to the customer – reducing or eliminating much of the costs of shipping and warehousing and reducing wastage from unused products. 3D Printing really is green.Pepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 45
  46. 46. Summary & Conclusions eBay democratized the global marketplace, empowering anyone to buy and sell to anyone else. 3D Printing is poised to democratize manufacturing and empower anyone to create and sell or share products with anyone else. For the conceivable future the majority of consumer goods will continue to be mass-produced. Over time, the best and smartest manufacturers will find ways to turn their economies of scale to their advantage in the evolving technological world. Indeed, China is concerned about the impact of 3D Printing on its own future, and is looking to jump on the 3D Printing bandwagon itself21.Pepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 46
  47. 47. Summary & Conclusions Will brands and manufacturers sleep through the next few years and awake to find themselves in trouble, or, will they be part of the solution?Pepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 47
  48. 48. Summary & Conclusions The Economist asks, is this “the PC all over again?” Machines that turn digital objects (bits) into physical objects are “Pioneering a whole new way of making things – one that could rewrite the rules of manufacturing in much the same way that the PC laid waste to traditional computing.1”Pepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 48
  49. 49. Summary & Conclusions This is not a better widget. This is not continued incremental improvement in existing processes and methods. This is, without exaggeration, world changing. Why I left Wired Magazine –3D Printing Will Be Bigger Than The Web. 23 -- Chris Anderson, former Wired Magazine Editor in ChiefPepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 49
  50. 50. References1. http://www.economist.com/news/technology-quarterly/21567201-difference-engine-just-computers-make-it-easy-copy-music- 3d-printers-will2. http://www.wired.com/design/2012/11/3d-printer-wood-filament/3. http://www.popsci.com/technology/article/2012-08/researcher-aims-print-3-d-print-entire-houses-out-concrete-20-hours4. http://www.zdnet.com/chris-anderson-why-i-left-wired-3d-printing-will-be-bigger-than-the-web-7000007535/5. http://www.fastcompany.com/3003509/staples-launches-easy-3d-printing-service-just-time-best-holiday-parties-ever6. http://news.usni.org/news-analysis/news/3d-printers-are-here-are-sea-services-taking-advantage7. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-149468088. http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20120621-printing-a-human-kidney9. http://www.economist.com/node/1554368310. http://www.theatlanticwire.com/technology/2011/12/reality-3d-printed-body-parts/45649/11. http://www.ted.com/talks/anthony_atala_printing_a_human_kidney.html12. http://www.ubergizmo.com/2012/08/3d-printed-arms-help-give-little-girl-a-new-lease-of-life/13. http://www.popsci.com/technology/article/2011-07/uk-engineers-print-and-fly-worlds-first-working-3-d-printed-aircraft14. http://www.army.mil/article/88464/15. http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2012/11/new-army-arsenal/16. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-2026964517. http://www.mitre.org/news/digest/advanced_research/08_10/layer.htm18. http://www.3dsystems.com/press-releases/3d-systems-completes-acquisition-z-corp-and-vidar19. http://www.fool.com/investing/general/2012/12/03/merger-creates-worlds-largest-3d-print-company.aspx20. http://investing.businessweek.com/research/stocks/private/snapshot.asp?privcapId=21795021. http://www.zdnet.com/cn/china-looks-to-3d-printing-for-manufacturing-edge-7000008931/22. http://www.economist.com/news/technology-quarterly/21567201-difference-engine-just-computers-make-it-easy-copy-music- 3d-printers-will23. http://www.zdnet.com/chris-anderson-why-i-left-wired-3d-printing-will-be-bigger-than-the-web-7000007535/Pepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 50
  51. 51. About the Authors Chris Norman is CEO of Kraftwurx and Digital Reality, the first and only B2B & B2C mass- customization system for 3D Printing. Mr. Norman is a member of the Direct Digital Manufacturing sub-committee to the Society of Manufacturing Engineers and 16 year member of SME. Mr. Norman earned his MBA in Technology Management from the University of Phoenix and a BS in Manufacturing Engineering from Texas A&M University. Contact Chris at chris@kraftwurx.com, and www.linkedin.com/pub/chris-norman/b/7b0/b12.Pepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 51
  52. 52. About the Authors Patrick Seaman is Chief Technology Advisor to Pepperwood Partners and COO of the social publishing platform company WhichBox Media. Seaman is the former COO of the video eCommerce company Cinsay, and former Director of Technology at Broadcast.com. Patrick serves on the Advisory Board of Kraftwurx Inc, and Qples, Inc. and on the UT Dallas School of Natural Sciences & Mathematics Advisory Council, and is an IEEE member. Contact Patrick at patrick@pepperwoodpartners.com, patrick@patrickseaman.com and www.linkedin.com/in/patrickseaman/.Pepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 52
  53. 53. About Pepperwood Partners Pepperwood Partners is a boutique investment banking advisory firm headquartered in Dallas, Texas. Pepperwood provides a suite of investment banking advisory services to businesses in the Two Lincoln Centre technology, media, telecom, 5420 LBJ Freeway, Suite 535 nanotechnology, energy and Dallas, Texas 75240 USA +1 214.442.6056 alternative asset sectors. With a info@pepperwoodpartners.com strong focus on institutional relationships in the Russian, Learn more at: European, and CIS regions, www.PepperwoodPartners.com Pepperwood works with businesses to achieve capitalization and growth objectives.Pepperwood Partners© All Rights Reserved January 2013 Page 53

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