MPAS 571                                Practical Applications in Medicine I1. Course Description: This course introduces ...
3.10Demonstrate the skills required to perform the basic emergency and surgical    procedures learned in this course relat...
3.17.1.2.1.10Gastric decontamination for poison or medication overdose            3.17.1.2.1.11Rectal prolapse reduction  ...
3.17.1.3.2.1.8 Toxic infectious rash                        3.17.1.3.2.1.9 Photosensitivity                        3.17.1....
3.7.1.1.1 Describe diagnostic imaging including radiographs, CT, MRI procedures in                    ENT disease.3.7.1.1 ...
3.7.1.1 Allergy and Immunology Module:          3.7.1.1.1 Describe the indications for, know when a surgical consultation ...
4.2 Guided faculty Lecture           4.3 Group discussion           4.4 Independent reading assignments           4.5 Pati...
XX.49% or less is rounded down.) Final course grades are assigned according to the   following academic standards:        ...
reading, writing, kinesthetic, and connecting the knowledge with in-class clinicaldiscussions.           Students will wri...
faculty reserves the right to require further organization or improvement to                  receive full credit. This sy...
13. Emergency Contact:All cell phones and pagers need to remain OFF during lectures and labs,    Monday through Friday. If...
MPAS 572                                 Practical Medical Applications II1. Course Description: This course builds upon p...
modules: cardiology, hematology, oncology, neurology, psychiatry, geriatrics,     rehabilitation, and palliative care.3.19...
3.25.1.1.2.2Syncope         3.25.1.1.2.3Congestive heart failure         3.25.1.1.2.4Valvular heart disease         3.25.1...
3.25.3.1.2.5Adrenal crisis         3.25.3.1.2.6SAIDH         3.25.3.1.2.7Neutropenic fever         3.25.3.1.2.8Hyperviscos...
3.25.6.1.1 Describe the indications for, know when a surgical consultation is                         warranted, and demon...
5.7 End of module practical exams and demonstrations of procedures (30 % of                   total grade)               5...
Hematology          Oncology                                      Emergency and surgery related to                        ...
his/her learning style. Examples might include organizing into a chart or                  table. The final product should...
4. Academic Honesty Policy: At a Christian liberal arts university, committed to the pursuit of   truth and understanding,...
MPAS 573                              Practical Applications in Medicine III1. Course Description: This culminating course...
3.8 Demonstrate the skills required to perform the basic emergency and surgical procedures     learned in this course rela...
3.12.4.1 Describe the indications for, know when a surgical consultation is warranted, and             demonstrate the abi...
3.12.7.2.2   Strains and sprains            3.12.7.2.3   Fractures            3.12.7.2.4   Compartment syndromes          ...
to clinical situations will be emphasized. Exams may be multiple choice, short answer,     essay, practical, problem based...
Rheumatology            November 15-23                Emergency and surgery related to                                    ...
organized format. The assignment might be expressed in a variety of               methods.                          8.6.1 ...
a. Cheating: using deception in the taking of tests or the preparation of written          work, using unauthorized materi...
MPAS 571
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

MPAS 571

770 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
770
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
5
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

MPAS 571

  1. 1. MPAS 571 Practical Applications in Medicine I1. Course Description: This course introduces the application of medical knowledge in emergency treatment and surgical procedures. Skills are learned which are necessary to treat patients in a variety of life threatening and surgical situations. Students learn appropriate diagnostic and hands on therapeutic and procedural measures relating to the following modules: infectious disease, EENT, ophthalmology, gastrointestinal, pulmonary, allergy, immunology, dermatology, genetics, and tropical medicine. This class is taught using a variety of learning methods, including traditional lectures, case-based learning, simulated patient encounters, and laboratory exercises.2. Course Materials: 2.1. Essential Clinical Procedures, Richard W. Dehn, ISBN: 978-1416030010 2.2. Emergency Medicine Manual, O. John Ma ISBN: 978-0071410250 2.3. Essential Emergency Procedures, Kaushal Shah, ISBN: 978-0781774901 2.4. Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support Provider Manual, American Heart Association, ISBN: 978-0874934960 2.5. Pediatric Advanced Life Support Course Guide, American Heart Association3. Course Objectives 3.1. Know what signifies an emergency according to the following modules infectious disease, EENT, ophthalmology, gastrointestinal, pulmonary, allergy, immunology, dermatology, genetics, and tropical medicine. 3.2. Demonstrate the critical thinking involved in setting priorities in an emergency setting. 3.3. List life-threatening signs and symptoms for both adults and children in the following modules: infectious disease, EENT, ophthalmology, gastrointestinal, pulmonary, allergy, immunology, dermatology, genetics, and tropical medicine. 3.4. Assess and treat emergencies in the following modules: Infectious disease, EENT, ophthalmic, pulmonary, allergic, immunologic, gastroenterological, and tropical medicine. 3.6. Demonstrate an understanding of the basic concepts of trauma care relative to each system/module studied. Demonstrate knowledge of the pre-operative evaluation, intra- operative and post-operative care of the surgical patient relating to the following modules: infectious disease, EENT, ophthalmology, gastrointestinal, pulmonary, allergy, immunology, dermatology, genetics, and tropical medicine. 3.7 Demonstrate an understanding of the operating room environment, including asceptic technique, and the importance of teamwork. 3.8 Evaluate and present case studies of patients with surgical and emergency conditions, demonstrating an understanding of pertinent history, physical examination findings, pertinent diagnostic studies, surgical procedures, and appropriate treatment plan relative to each module studied. 3.9 Describe the anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, indications, and evaluation of patients with common surgical problems relating to the following modules: infectious disease, EENT, ophthalmology, gastrointestinal, pulmonary, allergy, immunology, dermatology, genetics, and tropical medicine.
  2. 2. 3.10Demonstrate the skills required to perform the basic emergency and surgical procedures learned in this course relating to the following modules: infectious disease, EENT, ophthalmology, gastrointestinal, pulmonary, allergy, immunology, dermatology, genetics, and tropical medicine.3.11Describe the ethical rationale, legal requirements, and procedure for obtaining an informed consent for surgery.3.12Recognize and describe the purpose and use of each of the following surgical instruments: Scalpel, tissue scissors, forceps, retractor, needle holder, hemostat, cautery, suture scissors, towel clip, and staple gun.3.13Communicate appropriate discharge instructions to the treated patient in the included modules as related to emergent situations including follow up recommendations, pain control, patient education, and the importance of risk management strategies in the ED.3.14Demonstrate the ability to write and interpret the following surgical medical records relating to the following modules: infectious disease, EENT, ophthalmology, gastrointestinal, pulmonary, allergy, immunology, dermatology, genetics, and tropical medicine. 3.14.1 pre-operative history and physical examination 3.14.2 post-operative note 3.14.3 post-operative progress/SOAP notes 3.14.4 recovery room notes3.15pre- and post-operative order writing3.16Describe and discuss assessment of the patient for fitness for surgery, including: 3.16.1 Preoperative assessment and risk scoring systems 3.16.2 Preoperative laboratory testing and imaging 3.16.3 Management of complicating medical conditions 3.16.4 Management of current medications3.17Modular objectives: 3.17.1.1Introductory Module: 3.17.1.1.1 Demonstrate a complete understanding of the following: Informed consent, standard precautions, and sterile technique. 3.17.1.2Gastrointestinal module: 3.17.1.2.1 Describe the indications for, know when a surgical consultation is warranted, and demonstrate the ability to perform and/or explain in detail the following surgical and emergency procedures related to gastroenterology: 3.17.1.2.1.1 Emergency stabilization for GI bleed 3.17.1.2.1.2NG tube placement 3.17.1.2.1.3Anoscopy 3.17.1.2.1.4Flexible sigmoidoscopy 3.17.1.2.1.5Endoscopy for perforation or foreign body removal 3.17.1.2.1.6Appendectomy 3.17.1.2.1.7Hernia repair 3.17.1.2.1.8Hemrrhoidectomy 3.17.1.2.1.9Anorectal abcess drainage and care
  3. 3. 3.17.1.2.1.10Gastric decontamination for poison or medication overdose 3.17.1.2.1.11Rectal prolapse reduction 3.17.1.2.1.12Bowel resection 3.17.1.2.1.13 Cholecystectomy 3.17.1.2.1.14 Fecal disimpaction 3.17.1.2.2 Describe and discuss common surgical and emergency conditions their presentation, differential diagnosis, diagnostic criteria, labs and special studies, appropriate referral, and treatment for the following: 3.17.1.2.2.1Inguinal hernia, umbilical hernia, incisional (ventral) hernia 3.17.1.2.2.2Gastrectomy and bariatric s-urgical procedures 3.17.1.2.2.3PUD, gastritis, and GI bleed 3.17.1.2.2.4Esophageal emergencies (dysphagia, GERD, perforation) 3.17.1.2.2.5Ingested foreign bodies 3.17.1.2.2.6Bowel obstruction 3.17.1.2.2.7Appendicitis 3.17.1.2.2.8Cholecystitis and biliary colic 3.17.1.2.2.9Pancreatitis 3.17.1.2.2.10Anoretal disorders and colorectal cancer 3.17.1.2.2.11Acute abdominal pain 3.17.1.2.2.12Ileitis, colitis, and divereticulitis 3.17.1.2.2.13Vomiting, diarrhea, and constipation 3.17.1.2.2.14Jaundice and hepatic disorders3.17.1.3Dermatology Module: 3.17.1.3.1.1Describe the indications for, know when a surgical consultation is warranted, and demonstrate the ability to perform and/or explain in detail the following surgical and emergency procedures related to dermatology: 3.17.1.3.1.1.1 Local anesthesia 3.17.1.3.1.1.2 Wound closure and dressing (varied suture closures) 3.17.1.3.1.1.3 Abcess I&D 3.17.1.3.1.1.4 Biopsies 3.17.1.3.1.1.5 Cryosurgery and electrosurgery 3.17.1.3.1.1.6 Ingrown toenail removal 3.17.1.3.1.1.7 Subungual hematoma drainage 3.17.1.3.2 Describe and discuss common surgical and emergency conditions their presentation, differential diagnosis, diagnostic criteria, labs and special studies, and treatment for the following: 3.17.1.3.2.1.1 Lacerations 3.17.1.3.2.1.2 Soft tissue and foreign body injuries 3.17.1.3.2.1.3 Nail injuries 3.17.1.3.2.1.4 Puncture wounds 3.17.1.3.2.1.5 Exfoliative dermatitis 9chemical and drug eruptive rash) 3.17.1.3.2.1.6 Erythema multiforme 3.17.1.3.2.1.7 Toxic epidermal necrolysis
  4. 4. 3.17.1.3.2.1.8 Toxic infectious rash 3.17.1.3.2.1.9 Photosensitivity 3.17.1.3.2.1.10Skin burns 3.17.1.3.2.1.11Frostbite and pernio 3.17.1.3.2.1.12Bites and stings 3.17.1.3.2.1.13Contact dermatitis 3.17.1.3.2.1.14infectious dermatological conditions 3.17.1.3.2.2Describe the stages of wound healing and how to dress wounds. 3.17.1.3.2.3Select appropriate method for closing wounds, achieving hemostasis, closure of dead space, approximation of like tissues. 3.17.1.3.2.4Discuss the use of different types of suture materials and needles. 3.17.1.3.2.5Describe and demonstrate wound care, closure techniques, and the indications/contraindications for each.3.17.1.4HEENT and ophthalmology Module: 3.17.1.4.1 Describe the indications for, know when a surgical consultation is warranted, and demonstrate the ability to perform and/or explain in detail the following surgical and emergency procedures related to HEENT and ophthamology: 3.17.1.4.1.1Removal of cerumen and foreign bodies from the ear 3.17.1.4.1.2Ocular foreign body removal 3.17.1.4.1.3Trauma oriented ocular examination 3.17.1.4.2 Describe and discuss common surgical and emergency conditions their presentation, differential diagnosis, diagnostic criteria, labs and special studies, and treatment for the following: 3.17.1.4.2.1Corneal abrasion 3.17.1.4.2.2Optic and otic foreign body 3.17.1.4.2.3Ocular infections (sty, conjunctivitis, chalazion, herpes, periorbital cellulitis, corneal ulcer) 3.17.1.4.2.4Ocular trauma (subconjunctival hemorrhage, lid laceration, blunt trauma, hyphema, blowout fractures, ruptured globe, chemical injury, burns) 3.17.1.4.2.5Keratitis 3.17.1.4.2.6Acute visual loss (acute angle closure glaucoma, optic neuritis, retinal artery or vein occlusion, giant call arteritis.) 3.17.1.4.2.7TM perforation 3.17.1.4.2.8Facial infections (impetigo, erysipelas, cellulitis) 3.17.1.4.2.9Salivary gland disorders (parotitis, abcess, sialolithiasis) 3.17.1.4.2.10Mandibular disorders (TMJ dysfunction, dislocation) 3.17.1.4.2.11Otologic infection (Otitis externia, otitis media, mastoiditis, bullous myringitis) 3.17.1.4.2.12Ear trauma 3.17.1.4.2.13Tinnitus and hearing loss 3.17.1.4.2.14Nasal emergencies (epistaxis, sinusitis, and fracture) 3.17.1.4.2.15Dental emergencies
  5. 5. 3.7.1.1.1 Describe diagnostic imaging including radiographs, CT, MRI procedures in ENT disease.3.7.1.1 Pulmonology Module: 3.7.1.1.1 Describe the indications for, know when a surgical consultation is warranted, and demonstrate the ability to perform and/or explain in detail the following surgical and emergency procedures related to pulminology: 3.7.1.1.1.1 Office pulmonary function testing 3.7.1.1.1.2 Endotrachial intubation and other advanced airway techniques 3.7.1.1.1.3 Arterial blood gasses 3.7.1.1.1.4 peripheral IV catheter placement 3.7.1.1.1.5 needle/chest tube thoracostomy 3.7.1.1.2 Describe and discuss common surgical and emergency conditions their presentation, differential diagnosis, diagnostic criteria, labs and special studies, and treatment for the following: 3.7.1.1.2.1 acute asthma and COPD exacerbations 3.7.1.1.2.2 pulmonary embolism 3.7.1.1.2.3 pulmonary contusion 3.7.1.1.2.4 pneumothorax 3.7.1.1.2.5 hemothorax 3.7.1.1.2.6 dyspnea 3.7.1.1.2.7 hypoxemia 3.7.1.1.2.8 hypercapnia 3.7.1.1.2.9 wheezing 3.7.1.1.2.10cyanosis 3.7.1.1.2.11bronchitis, pneumonia, and SARS 3.7.1.1.2.12TB and HIV pulmonic emergencies 3.7.1.1.2.13hemoptysis 3.7.1.1.3 Properly identify metabolic and respiratory acidosis and alkalosis when given the results of an arterial blood gas. 3.7.1.1.4 When given a chest x-ray, describe a proper technique in evaluating the film and demonstrate the ability to diagnose lung disorders based on the chest x-ray.3.7.1.2 Tropical medicine module: 3.7.1.2.1 Describe the indications for and demonstrate the ability to perform and/or explain in detail the following procedures related to tropical medicine: 3.7.1.2.1.1 Injections and vaccinations 3.7.1.2.2 Describe and discuss common surgical and emergency conditions their presentation, differential diagnosis, diagnostic criteria, labs and special studies, and treatment for the following: 3.7.1.2.2.1 environmental emergencies (hypothermia, hyperthermia, near drowning, burns (thermal, chemical, electrical), smoke inhalation, stings/bites.) 3.7.1.2.2.2 shock of various types 3.7.1.2.2.3 various illnesses specific to tropical regions
  6. 6. 3.7.1.1 Allergy and Immunology Module: 3.7.1.1.1 Describe the indications for, know when a surgical consultation is warranted, and demonstrate the ability to perform and/or explain in detail the following surgical and emergency procedures related to allergy and immunology: 3.7.1.1.1.1 Intubation for respiratory allergic reactions 3.7.1.1.1.2 System stabilization 3.7.1.1.2 Describe and discuss common surgical and emergency conditions their presentation, differential diagnosis, diagnostic criteria, labs and special studies, and treatment for anaphalaxis and acute allergic reactions 3.7.1.1.3 Identify the 4 different hypersensitivity reactions and distinguish which one a patient may have based on the history and physical examination. 3.7.1.1.4 Evaluate and present case studies of patients that have allergic and immunologic emergencies, demonstrating an understanding of pertinent history, physical examination findings, pertinent diagnostic studies, and appropriate treatment plans. 3.7.1.1.5 Describe the pathogenesis, classification, and principles of resuscitation of anaphylactic and septic shock.3.7.1.1 Infectious Disease Module: 3.7.1.1.1 Describe the indications for, know when a surgical consultation is warranted, and demonstrate the ability to perform and/or explain in detail the following surgical and emergency procedures related to infectious disease: 3.7.1.1.1.1 Obtaining blood cultures 3.7.1.1.1.2 Venipuncture 3.7.1.1.1.3 Lumbar puncture 3.7.1.1.2 Describe and discuss common surgical and emergency conditions their presentation, differential diagnosis, diagnostic criteria, labs and special studies, and treatment for the following: 3.7.1.1.2.1 Sexually transmitted diseases 3.7.1.1.2.2 Toxic shock 3.7.1.1.2.3 Common viral infections 3.7.1.1.2.4 HIV and AIDS 3.7.1.1.2.5 Infective endocarditis 3.7.1.1.2.6 Tetanus and Rabies 3.7.1.1.2.7 Malaria 3.7.1.1.2.8 Helminth infections 3.7.1.1.2.9 Zoonotic infections 3.7.1.1.2.10Soft tissue infections 3.7.1.1.2.11Bioterrorism 3.7.1.1.2.12Management of the transplant patient4. Student Activities and Experiences (Instructional techniques) 4.1 Case studies that provide opportunity to analyze clinical correlations
  7. 7. 4.2 Guided faculty Lecture 4.3 Group discussion 4.4 Independent reading assignments 4.5 Patient vignettes to synthesize and integrate the materials into a real life clinical context. 4.6 Integrated computer technology will be utilized to enhance learning. 4.7 Faculty demonstration of procedures and diagnostic techniques 4.8 Hands-on experience through the use of simulated patients and procedures 4.9 Collaborative experience will be gained through cooperative laboratory learning groups5. Assessment Techniques 5.1 Comprehensive final examination (30% of total grade) 5.2 End of module practical exams and demonstrations of procedures (30 % of total grade) 5.3 Cooperative Group Clinical correlation case studies given each module (15 % of total grade) 5.4 Pre-Prep Notes (15 % of total grade) 5.5 Full attendance and participation with professional behavior (10 % of total grade)6. Grading: Examinations and quizzes will be based on classroom lectures, assignments, and textbook material. The ability to synthesize and manipulate concepts as they relate to clinical situations will be emphasized. Exams may be multiple choice, short answer, essay, practical, problem based, true and false, matching, or fill-in-the-blank. Students will refer to the academic bulletin and the PA department grading policies for requirements for progression in the PA program. Grades are based not only on exam performance but on Pre-prep notes, Cooperative Group Assignments, and attendance with participation.7. Course grades: are calculated on a percentage basis. All final course grade percentages are rounded to the nearest integer. (XX.50% or higher is rounded up to the next higher integer.
  8. 8. XX.49% or less is rounded down.) Final course grades are assigned according to the following academic standards: Didactic & Research Courses Percent Grade Letter Grade 90 – 100 A student has exceeded expectations 80 – 89 B student has met expectations 70-79 C student is below expectations Less than 70 F student has failed expectations An “I” may be temporarily awarded to individuals who fail to complete course requirements within the defined time. A final grade of “F” in any PA course is a non-passing grade and results in automatic and immediate dismissal from the PA Program.8. Tentative Schedule: Module Lecture topics Dates Lecture and laboratory TOPICS Intro to health care Intro to surgery and emergency in and laboratory Jan 15-21 health care and laboratory medicine medicine Infectious Disease surgery and emergency in Jan 22-Feb 5 Infectious Disease Otorhinolaryngology surgery and emergency in Feb 8-17 Otorhinolaryngology Ophthalmology surgery and emergency in Feb 18-25 Ophthalmology Pulminology surgery and emergency in Feb26-March10 Pulminology Allergy and surgery and emergency in Allergy March 11-26 Immunology and Immunology Dermatology surgery and emergency in March 29-April 7 Dermatology Genetics April 8-9 surgery and emergency topics Gastroenterology surgery and emergency in April 10-22 Gastroenterology Tropical Medicine surgery and emergency in Tropical April 23-28 Medicine April 30 Cumulative Final9. Pre-Prep Note system: This learning and evaluation method is an effective vehicle for students to prepare for in-class discussions and maximize learning styles. By participating in the Pre-Prep note system, the student will be using multiple learning methods; such as,
  9. 9. reading, writing, kinesthetic, and connecting the knowledge with in-class clinicaldiscussions. Students will write an average of one page of pre-prep notes for each topic assigned that day using the template outlined below. Students can use all reading resources. If any topic assigned for a particular day does not have a specific reading assignment in the required textbooks for the course, the student can use internet database or other resources. The faculty will supplement resources as needed if the textbooks have an inadequate amount of information for assigned topics. 8.1 Template for Pre-Prep Notes: 8.1.1 Definition 8.1.2 Etiology 8.1.3 Pathogenesis 8.1.4 Clinical symptoms 8.1.5 Physical Examination (PE) 8.1.6 Differential Diagnoses (at least 3) 8.1.7 Evaluation with a diagnostic approach i.e. history, PE, laboratory studies, X-ray, CT, MRI, etc. 8.1.8 Treatment 8.1.9 Rehabilitation/referral to specialists if applicable 8.2 Evaluation of Pre-Prep Notes: Students will be required to compile pre-prep notes for every designated topic assigned for certain class periods. At the completion of each module and on the date of the written exam, students will turn in their binders for faculty to review. This assignment is considered a learning method and completion demonstrates competency. The students are encouraged to organize the pre-prep notes in a system that best supports his/her learning style. Examples might include organizing into a chart or table. The final product should be a vehicle to assist the student when studying for course exams and ultimately for the PANCE exam. The pre-prep notes should be considered a portfolio where the information is organized into a binder with materials that might include the recommended template written prior to class, and the class notes that can be combined into an organized format. The assignment might be expressed in a variety of methods. 8.2.1 Faculty will review each student’s pre-prep notes for the following: 8.2.1.1 Completeness: each topic assigned must have an organized pre-prep note. The pre-prep notes may be combined with course handouts to provide a better system to study for examinations 8.2.1.2 Clarity: students must follow some recognizable system. 8.2.1.3 Depth and Breadth: There is no exact length for each topic, but about 1 to 1½ pages for each topic should be the approximate amount in typed form. Charts or tables can be used if indicated. Course notes can be combined with pre-prep notes. 8.2.2 Faculty will review the student’s pre-prep notes at the conclusion of each module. If the portfolio is incomplete and has no organized system the
  10. 10. faculty reserves the right to require further organization or improvement to receive full credit. This system is meant to enhance learning and not to be unnecessary extra work. The faculty will award full credit for this assignment unless the student fails to show adequate effort, does not hand in their binder by the end of the school day of the module’s exam, or refuses to turn in the pre-prep notes at which time, the student will receive a “0” as their Pre-prep note component grade.10. Cooperative Learning Assignments: Cooperative learning is the instructional use of small groups that allows students to work together to maximize their own and each others’ learning. The cooperative learning method uses a group study task structure with an incentive structure in which students receive a group reward for a group product. This involves a high degree of cooperation between students. Assignments will be case-based upon the module that is being completed. Grades will be based on the accuracy and the completeness of the group’s responses to the questions in each case. Each group will receive one grade for the cases (each member will receive that grade therefore, it is expected that each member contribute fully to this group assignment).11. Academic Honesty Policy: At a Christian liberal arts university, committed to the pursuit of truth and understanding, any act of academic dishonesty is especially distressing and cannot be tolerated. In general, academic dishonesty involves the abuse and misuse of information or people to gain an undeserved academic advantage or evaluation. The common forms of academic dishonesty include: 11.1.Cheating: using deception in the taking of tests or the preparation of written work, using unauthorized materials, copying another person’s work with or without consent, or assisting another in such activities; 11.2.Lying: falsifying fabricating, or forging information n either written or spoken presentations; 11.3.Plagiarism: using the published writings, data, interpretations of ideas of another without proper documentation Episodes of academic dishonesty are reported to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. The potential penalty for academic dishonesty includes: 1.) A failing grade on a particular assignment 2.) A failing grade for the entire course 3.) Charges against the student with the appropriate discipline body12. ADA Statement: In accordance with Americans with Disabilities Act, any student in this class who has a documented learning disability will be provided with reasonable accommodations designed to meet his/her needs. Before any such assistance can occur, it is the responsibility of the student to see that documentation is on file with Academic Affairs. If you have documented special needs you must make them known to the instructor prior to the third week of class.
  11. 11. 13. Emergency Contact:All cell phones and pagers need to remain OFF during lectures and labs, Monday through Friday. If someone needs to reach you during that time, the administrative assistant for the program will take any important phone messages.
  12. 12. MPAS 572 Practical Medical Applications II1. Course Description: This course builds upon previous acquisition of procedural and emergency care skills and focuses on applying that knowledge to additional emergency and surgical situations. Students learn appropriate diagnostic, therapeutic, and surgical measures relating to the following modules: cardiology, hematology, oncology, neurology, psychiatry, geriatrics, rehabilitation, and palliative care. This class is taught using a variety of learning methods, including traditional lectures, case-based learning, simulated patient encounters, and laboratory exercises.2. Course Materials: 2.1. Essential Clinical Procedures, Richard W. Dehn, ISBN: 978-1416030010 2.2. Emergency Medicine Manual, O. John Ma ISBN: 978-0071410250 2.3. Essential Emergency Procedures, Kaushal Shah, ISBN: 978-0781774901 2.4. Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support Provider Manual, American Heart Association, ISBN: 978-0874934960 2.5. Pediatric Advanced Life Support Course Guide, American Heart Association3. Course Objectives: 3.1. Know what signifies an emergency according to the following modules: cardiology, hematology, oncology, neurology, psychiatry, geriatrics, rehabilitation, and palliative care. 3.2. Demonstrate the critical thinking involved in setting priorities in an emergency setting. 3.3. List life-threatening signs and symptoms for both adults and children in the following modules: cardiology, hematology, oncology, neurology, psychiatry, geriatrics, rehabilitation, and palliative care. 3.4. Assess and treat emergencies in the following modules: cardiology, hematology, oncology, neurology, psychiatry, geriatrics, rehabilitation, and palliative care. 3.5. Demonstrate an understanding of the basic concepts of trauma care relative to each system/module studied. 3.6. Demonstrate knowledge of the pre-operative evaluation, intra-operative and post- operative care of the surgical patient relating to the following modules: cardiology, hematology, oncology, neurology, psychiatry, geriatrics, rehabilitation, and palliative care. 3.7. Evaluate and present case studies of patients with surgical and emergency conditions, demonstrating an understanding of pertinent history, physical examination findings, pertinent diagnostic studies, surgical procedures, and appropriate treatment plan relative to each module studied. 3.18Describe the anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, indications, and evaluation of patients with common surgical problems relating to the following
  13. 13. modules: cardiology, hematology, oncology, neurology, psychiatry, geriatrics, rehabilitation, and palliative care.3.19 Demonstrate the skills required to perform the basic emergency and surgical procedures learned in this course relating to the following modules: cardiology, hematology, oncology, neurology, psychiatry, geriatrics, rehabilitation, and palliative care.3.20Communicate appropriate discharge instructions to the treated patient in the included modules as related to emergent situations including follow up recommendations, pain control, patient education, and the importance of risk management strategies in the ED.3.21 Demonstrate the ability to write and interpret the following surgical medical records relating to the following modules: cardiology, hematology, oncology, neurology, psychiatry, geriatrics, rehabilitation, and palliative care. 3.21.1 pre-operative history and physical examination 3.21.2 post-operative note 3.21.3 post-operative progress/SOAP notes 3.21.4 recovery room notes3.22Describe and discuss assessment of the patient for fitness for surgery, including: 3.22.1 Preoperative assessment and risk scoring systems 3.22.2 Preoperative laboratory testing and imaging 3.22.3 Management of complicating medical conditions 3.22.4 Management of current medications3.23Understand medico legal and ethical problems encountered in the Emergency Department.3.24Describe and demonstrate an understanding of operating room protocol and etiquette, policies, and procedures, including: 3.24.1 General operating room setup 3.24.2 The roles and responsibilities of common OR personnel, including the role of the PA as first assist 3.24.3 Sterile technique 3.24.4 Gowning and gloving 3.24.5 Pass (must achieve an 80% or better) an AORN-based practicum on scrubbing, gowning, gloving, and maintaining sterile field.3.25Modular objectives: 3.25.1 Cardiology: 3.25.1.1.1 Describe the indications for, know when a surgical consultation is warranted, and demonstrate the ability to perform and/or explain in detail the following surgical and emergency procedures related to cardiology: 3.25.1.1.1.1Recording and reading an electrocardiogram 3.25.1.1.1.2Stress testing 3.25.1.1.2 Describe and discuss common surgical and emergency conditions their presentation, differential diagnosis, diagnostic criteria, labs and special studies, appropriate referral, and treatment for the following: 3.25.1.1.2.1Chest pain (angina, aortic dissection, pericarditis, pericardial tamponade, pulmonary embolus, myocardial infarction)
  14. 14. 3.25.1.1.2.2Syncope 3.25.1.1.2.3Congestive heart failure 3.25.1.1.2.4Valvular heart disease 3.25.1.1.2.5Cardiomyopathy 3.25.1.1.2.6Myocarditis 3.25.1.1.2.7Cardiogenic shock 3.25.1.1.2.8Hypertensive urgencies/emergencies 3.25.1.1.2.9Aortic dissection 3.25.1.1.2.10Aneurysms 3.25.1.1.2.11Peripheral vascular disorders 3.25.1.1.3 Evaluate the pathophysiology of acute arrhythmias, and using BCLS/ACLS standards, utilize appropriate therapies in an emergent setting including defibrillation, cardioversion, pharmacologic resuscitation and stabilization. 3.25.1.1.4 Score a passing grade on BLS and ACLS classes. 3.25.1.1.5 Recognize common EKG findings, presenting symptomology, treatment and stabilization standards of care in the face of acute myocardial infarction/unstable angina.3.25.2 Hematology: 3.25.2.1.1 Describe the indications for, know when a surgical consultation is warranted, and demonstrate the ability to perform and/or explain in detail the following surgical and emergency procedures related to hematology 3.25.2.1.1.1Venipuncture 3.25.2.1.1.2Transfusion therapy 3.25.2.1.1.3Antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy 3.25.2.1.2 Describe and discuss common surgical and emergency conditions their presentation, differential diagnosis, diagnostic criteria, labs and special studies, appropriate referral, and treatment for the following: 3.25.2.1.2.1Anemia 3.25.2.1.2.2Bleeding disorders 3.25.2.1.2.3Hemophilias 3.25.2.1.2.4Von willebrand disease3.25.3 Oncology; 3.25.3.1.1 Describe the indications for, know when a surgical consultation is warranted, and demonstrate the ability to perform and/or explain in detail surgical and emergency procedures related to oncology. 3.25.3.1.2 Describe and discuss common surgical and emergency conditions their presentation, differential diagnosis, diagnostic criteria, labs and special studies, appropriate referral, and treatment for the following: 3.25.3.1.2.1Oncologic Bone emergencies 3.25.3.1.2.2Oncologic spinal cord compression 3.25.3.1.2.3Oncologicairway obstruction 3.25.3.1.2.4Tumor lysis syndrome
  15. 15. 3.25.3.1.2.5Adrenal crisis 3.25.3.1.2.6SAIDH 3.25.3.1.2.7Neutropenic fever 3.25.3.1.2.8Hyperviscosity syndrome 3.25.3.1.2.9Oncologic nausea and vomiting 3.25.3.1.2.10Oncologic pain control3.25.4 Neurology: 3.25.4.1.1 Describe the indications for, know when a surgical consultation is warranted, and demonstrate the ability to perform and/or explain in detail surgical and emergency procedures related to neurology. 3.25.4.1.2 Describe and discuss common surgical and emergency conditions their presentation, differential diagnosis, diagnostic criteria, labs and special studies, appropriate referral, and treatment for the following: 3.25.4.1.2.1Neurogenic shock 3.25.4.1.2.2Stroke and TIA 3.25.4.1.2.3 vertigo/dizziness 3.25.4.1.2.4 Syncope 3.25.4.1.2.5Acute peripheral neurologic lesions 3.25.4.1.2.6Chronic neurologic disorders 3.25.4.1.2.7 altered mental status and coma 3.25.4.1.2.8Ataxia and gait disturbances 3.25.4.1.2.9 Seizures 3.25.4.1.2.10Headache 3.25.4.1.2.11Temporal arteritis 3.25.4.1.2.12head trauma 3.25.4.1.2.13 C-spine injury 3.25.4.1.2.14Meningitis, encephalitis, and brain abcess3.25.5 Psychology: 3.25.5.1.1 Describe the indications for, know when a surgical consultation is warranted, and demonstrate the ability to perform and/or explain in detail surgical and emergency procedures related to psychological disorders. 3.25.5.1.2 Describe and discuss common surgical and emergency conditions their presentation, differential diagnosis, diagnostic criteria, labs and special studies, appropriate referral, and treatment for the following: 3.25.5.1.2.1Behavioral disorders 3.25.5.1.2.2Panic and conversion disorders 3.25.5.1.2.3Emergency stabilization of the psychotic patient 3.25.5.1.3 Identify risks and concerns of acutely poisoned patients, the appropriate gastric decontamination/treatment of such patients and the role of mental health examination in cases of purposeful overdose situations.3.25.6 Geriatrics:
  16. 16. 3.25.6.1.1 Describe the indications for, know when a surgical consultation is warranted, and demonstrate the ability to perform and/or explain in detail surgical and emergency procedures in a geriatric population. 3.25.6.1.2 Describe and discuss common surgical and emergency conditions their presentation, differential diagnosis, diagnostic criteria, labs and special studies, appropriate referral, and treatment for the following: 3.25.6.1.2.1Elder abuse 3.25.6.1.2.2Trauma 3.25.6.1.2.3falls 3.25.7 Rehab, occupational medicine, and palliative care: 3.25.7.1.1 Describe and discuss common surgical and emergency conditions their presentation, differential diagnosis, diagnostic criteria, labs and special studies, appropriate referral, and treatment common to rehab and occupational medicinepatients. 3.25.7.1.2 Describe appropriate intervention/treatment of the patient exhibiting narcotic seeking behavior. 3.25.7.1.3 Describe appropriate evaluation and management of common emergent workplace/occupational injuries/exposures including:4. Student Activities and Experiences (Instructional techniques) 4.10Case studies that provide opportunity to analyze clinical correlations 4.11Guided faculty Lecture 4.12Group discussion 4.13Independent reading assignments 4.14Patient vignettes to synthesize and integrate the materials into a real life clinical context. 4.15Integrated computer technology will be utilized to enhance learning. 4.16Faculty demonstration of procedures and diagnostic techniques 4.17Hands-on experience through the use of simulated patients and procedures 4.18Collaborative experience will be gained through cooperative laboratory learning groups5. Assessment Techniques 5.6 Comprehensive final examination (30% of total grade)
  17. 17. 5.7 End of module practical exams and demonstrations of procedures (30 % of total grade) 5.8 Cooperative Group Clinical correlation case studies given each module (15 % of total grade) 5.9 Pre-Prep Notes (15 % of total grade) 5.10Full attendance and participation with professional behavior (10 % of total grade)6. Grading: Examinations and quizzes will be based on classroom lectures, assignments, and textbook material. The ability to synthesize and manipulate concepts as they relate to clinical situations will be emphasized. Exams may be multiple choice, short answer, essay, practical, problem based, true and false, matching, or fill-in-the-blank. Students will refer to the academic bulletin and the PA department grading policies for requirements for progression in the PA program. Grades are based not only on exam performance but on Pre-prep notes, Cooperative Group Assignments, and attendance with participation.7. Course grades: are calculated on a percentage basis. All final course grade percentages are rounded to the nearest integer. (XX.50% or higher is rounded up to the next higher integer. XX.49% or less is rounded down.) Final course grades are assigned according to the following academic standards: Didactic & Research Courses Percent Grade Letter Grade 90 – 100 A student has exceeded expectations 80 – 89 B student has met expectations 70-79 C student is below expectations Less than 70 F student has failed expectations An “I” may be temporarily awarded to individuals who fail to complete course requirements within the defined time. A final grade of “F” in any PA course is a non-passing grade and results in automatic and immediate dismissal from the PA Program.8. Tentative Schedule: Module Lecture and small group discussion Dates TOPICS Cardiology Emergency and surgery related to May 10-June 4 Cardiology Hematology June7-15 Emergency and surgery related to
  18. 18. Hematology Oncology Emergency and surgery related to June16-24 Oncology Neurology Emergency and surgery related to June25-July 9 Neurology Psychology Emergency and surgery related to July 12-24 Psychiatry CAM and Occupational July 25-26 Emergency and surgery topics Medicine Geriatrics Emergency and surgery related to July 27-August 6 Geriatrics Rehabilitation and end Emergency and surgery related to August 9-11 of life care Rehabilitation and palliative care August 13 Cumulative Final9. Pre-Prep Note system: This learning and evaluation method is an effective vehicle for students to prepare for in-class discussions and maximize learning styles. By participating in the Pre-Prep note system, the student will be using multiple learning methods; such as, reading, writing, kinesthetic, and connecting the knowledge with in-class clinical discussions. Students will write an average of one page of pre-prep notes for each topic assigned that day using the template outlined below. Students can use all reading resources. If any topic assigned for a particular day does not have a specific reading assignment in the required textbooks for the course, the student can use internet database or other resources. The faculty will supplement resources as needed if the textbooks have an inadequate amount of information for assigned topics. 8.3 Template for Pre-Prep Notes: 8.3.1 Definition 8.3.2 Etiology 8.3.3 Pathogenesis 8.3.4 Clinical symptoms 8.3.5 Physical Examination (PE) 8.3.6 Differential Diagnoses (at least 3) 8.3.7 Evaluation with a diagnostic approach i.e. history, PE, laboratory studies, X-ray, CT, MRI, etc. 8.3.8 Treatment 8.3.9 Rehabilitation/referral to specialists if applicable 8.4 Evaluation of Pre-Prep Notes: Students will be required to compile pre-prep notes for every designated topic assigned for certain class periods. At the completion of each module and on the date of the written exam, students will turn in their binders for faculty to review. This assignment is considered a learning method and completion demonstrates competency. The students are encouraged to organize the pre-prep notes in a system that best supports
  19. 19. his/her learning style. Examples might include organizing into a chart or table. The final product should be a vehicle to assist the student when studying for course exams and ultimately for the PANCE exam. The pre-prep notes should be considered a portfolio where the information is organized into a binder with materials that might include the recommended template written prior to class, and the class notes that can be combined into an organized format. The assignment might be expressed in a variety of methods. 8.4.1 Faculty will review each student’s pre-prep notes for the following: 8.4.1.1 Completeness: each topic assigned must have an organized pre-prep note. The pre-prep notes may be combined with course handouts to provide a better system to study for examinations 8.4.1.2 Clarity: students must follow some recognizable system. 8.4.1.3 Depth and Breadth: There is no exact length for each topic, but about 1 to 1½ pages for each topic should be the approximate amount in typed form. Charts or tables can be used if indicated. Course notes can be combined with pre-prep notes. 8.2.2 Faculty will review the student’s pre-prep notes at the conclusion of each module. If the portfolio is incomplete and has no organized system the faculty reserves the right to require further organization or improvement to receive full credit. This system is meant to enhance learning and not to be unnecessary extra work. The faculty will award full credit for this assignment unless the student fails to show adequate effort, does not hand in their binder by the end of the school day of the module’s exam, or refuses to turn in the pre-prep notes at which time, the student will receive a “0” as their Pre-prep note component grade.10. Cooperative Learning Assignments: Cooperative learning is the instructional use of small groups that allows students to work together to maximize their own and each others’ learning. The cooperative learning method uses a group study task structure with an incentive structure in which students receive a group reward for a group product. This involves a high degree of cooperation between students. Assignments will be case-based upon the module that is being completed. Grades will be based on the accuracy and the completeness of the group’s responses to the questions in each case. Each group will receive one grade for the cases (each member will receive that grade therefore, it is expected that each member contribute fully to this group assignment).
  20. 20. 4. Academic Honesty Policy: At a Christian liberal arts university, committed to the pursuit of truth and understanding, any act of academic dishonesty is especially distressing and cannot be tolerated. In general, academic dishonesty involves the abuse and misuse of information or people to gain an undeserved academic advantage or evaluation. The common forms of academic dishonesty include: 4.1. Cheating: using deception in the taking of tests or the preparation of written work, using unauthorized materials, copying another person’s work with or without consent, or assisting another in such activities; 4.2. Lying: falsifying fabricating, or forging information n either written or spoken presentations; 4.3. Plagiarism: using the published writings, data, interpretations of ideas of another without proper documentation Episodes of academic dishonesty are reported to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. The potential penalty for academic dishonesty includes: 1.) A failing grade on a particular assignment 2.) A failing grade for the entire course 3.) Charges against the student with the appropriate discipline body5. ADA Statement: In accordance with Americans with Disabilities Act, any student in this class who has a documented learning disability will be provided with reasonable accommodations designed to meet his/her needs. Before any such assistance can occur, it is the responsibility of the student to see that documentation is on file with Academic Affairs. If you have documented special needs you must make them known to the instructor prior to the third week of class.6. Emergency Contact: All cell phones and pagers need to remain OFF during lectures and labs, Monday through Friday. If someone needs to reach you during that time, the administrative assistant for the program will take any important phone messages.
  21. 21. MPAS 573 Practical Applications in Medicine III1. Course Description: This culminating course ties together previous acquisition of procedural and emergency care skills and focuses on applying that knowledge to additional emergency and surgical situations. Students learn appropriate diagnostic, therapeutic, and surgical measures relating to the following modules: endocrine, nephrology, urology, sexual health, gynecology, obstetrics, pediatrics, rheumatology, and orthopedics. This class is taught using a variety of learning methods, including traditional lectures, case-based learning, simulated patient encounters, and laboratory exercises. Students will also learn principles of surgery including pre-operative, intra-operative, and post-operative care.2. Course Materials: a. Essential Clinical Procedures, Richard W. Dehn, ISBN: 978-1416030010 b. Emergency Medicine Manual, O. John Ma ISBN: 978-0071410250 c. Essential Emergency Procedures, Kaushal Shah, ISBN: 978-0781774901 d. Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support Provider Manual, American Heart Association, e. Pediatric Advanced Life Support Course Guide, American Heart Association3. Course Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: 3.1 Know what signifies an emergency according to the following modules: endocrine, nephrology, urology, sexual health, gynecology, obstetrics, pediatrics, rheumatology, and orthopedics. Demonstrate the critical thinking involved in setting priorities in an emergency setting. 3.2 List life-threatening signs and symptoms for the following modules: endocrine, nephrology, urology, sexual health, gynecology, obstetrics, pediatrics, rheumatology, and orthopedics. 3.3 Assess and treat emergencies in the following modules: endocrine, nephrology, urology, sexual health, gynecology, obstetrics, pediatrics, rheumatology, and orthopedics. 3.4 Demonstrate an understanding of the basic concepts of trauma care relative to each system/module studied. 3.5 Demonstrate knowledge of the pre-operative evaluation, intra-operative and post- operative care of the surgical patient relating to the following modules: endocrine, nephrology, urology, sexual health, gynecology, obstetrics, pediatrics, rheumatology, and orthopedics. 3.6 Evaluate and present case studies of patients with surgical and emergency conditions, demonstrating an understanding of pertinent history, physical examination findings, pertinent diagnostic studies, surgical procedures, and appropriate treatment plan relative to each module studied. 3.7 Describe the anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, indications, and evaluation of patients with common surgical problems relating to the following modules: endocrine, nephrology, urology, sexual health, gynecology, obstetrics, pediatrics, rheumatology, and orthopedics.
  22. 22. 3.8 Demonstrate the skills required to perform the basic emergency and surgical procedures learned in this course relating to the following modules: endocrine, nephrology, urology, sexual health, gynecology, obstetrics, pediatrics, rheumatology, and orthopedics.3.9 Communicate appropriate discharge instructions to the treated patient in the included modules as related to emergent situations including follow up recommendations, pain control, patient education, and the importance of risk management strategies in the ED.3.10 Demonstrate the ability to write and interpret surgical medical records relating to the following modules: endocrine, nephrology, urology, sexual health, gynecology, obstetrics, pediatrics, rheumatology, and orthopedics.3.11Discuss the prophylaxis, recognition, evaluation, and treatment of common post-operative problems, including: Wound infection, DVT, pulmonary embolism, Atelectasis, Pneumonia, Anxiety, Ileus, bowel obstruction, Pain management, Nausea and vomiting, and Urinary retention.3.12Modular objectives: 3.12.1 Endocrinology and Nutrition: 3.12.1.1 Describe the indications for, know when a surgical consultation is warranted, and demonstrate the ability to perform and/or explain in detail surgical and emergency procedures related to endocrinology. 3.12.1.2 Describe and discuss common surgical and emergency conditions their presentation, differential diagnosis, diagnostic criteria, labs and special studies, appropriate referral, and treatment for the following: 3.12.1.2.1 Diabetic emergencies 3.12.1.2.2 Alcoholic ketoacidosis 3.12.1.2.3 Thyroid emergencies 3.12.1.2.4 Adrenal insufficiency and crisis 3.12.2 Nephrology: 3.12.2.1 Describe the indications for, know when a surgical consultation is warranted, and demonstrate the ability to perform and/or explain in detail the following surgical and emergency procedures related to nephrology: 3.12.2.1.1 Urinary bladder catherization 3.12.2.1.2 Replacement and maintenance of fluid and electrolytes. 3.12.2.1.3 Post-operative fluid orders 3.12.2.1.4 Pre- and postoperative nutritional orders 3.12.2.2 Describe and discuss common surgical and emergency conditions their presentation, differential diagnosis, diagnostic criteria, labs and special studies, appropriate referral, and treatment for the following: 3.12.2.2.1 Acute renal failure 3.12.2.2.2 UTI’s 3.12.2.2.3 Hematuria 3.12.2.2.4 Urologic stone disease 3.12.2.2.5 Complications of urologic devices 3.12.3 Men’s Health and Urology: 3.12.3.1 Describe the indications for, know when a surgical consultation is warranted, and demonstrate the ability to perform and/or explain in detail surgical and emergency procedures related to men’s health and urology. 3.12.3.1.1 Describe and discuss common surgical and emergency conditions their presentation, differential diagnosis, diagnostic criteria, labs and special studies, appropriate referral, and treatment for male genital and urologic problems. 3.12.4 Women’s Health/Gynecology:
  23. 23. 3.12.4.1 Describe the indications for, know when a surgical consultation is warranted, and demonstrate the ability to perform and/or explain in detail surgical and emergency procedures related to women’s health and gynecology. 3.12.4.2 Describe and discuss common surgical and emergency conditions their presentation, differential diagnosis, diagnostic criteria, labs and special studies, appropriate referral, and treatment for the following: 3.12.4.2.1.1Rape 3.12.4.2.1.2Abnormal uterine bleeding 3.12.4.2.1.3Vulvovaginitis 3.12.4.2.1.4PID 3.12.4.2.1.5Ovarian cyst and abcess3.12.5 Obstetrics: 3.12.5.1 Describe the indications for, know when a surgical consultation is warranted, and demonstrate the ability to perform and/or explain in detail t surgical and emergency procedures related to obstetrics. 3.12.5.2 Define and integrate shock trauma resuscitation in pregnancy. 3.12.5.3 Describe and discuss common surgical and emergency conditions their presentation, differential diagnosis, diagnostic criteria, labs and special studies, appropriate referral, and treatment for the following: 3.12.5.3.1.1precipitous delivery 3.12.5.3.1.2ectopic pregnancy 3.12.5.3.1.3emergencies during pregnancy and the postpartum period3.12.6 Pediatrics: 3.12.6.1 Describe the indications for, know when a surgical consultation is warranted, and demonstrate the ability to perform and/or explain in detail surgical and emergency procedures related to pediatrics. 3.12.6.2 Score a passing grade on PALS class. 3.12.6.3 Discuss pediatric sedation issues. 3.12.6.4 Define and integrate shock trauma resuscitation in pediatric populations. 3.12.6.5 Determine the appropriate parental education in pediatric surgery and emergency. 3.12.6.6 Describe and discuss common surgical and emergency conditions their presentation, differential diagnosis, diagnostic criteria, labs and special studies, appropriate referral, and treatment for the following: 3.12.6.6.1.1croup/epiglottitis 3.12.6.6.1.2foreign body emergencies 3.12.6.6.1.3fever 3.12.6.6.1.4poison ingestion 3.12.6.6.1.5medication overdose 3.12.6.6.1.6pediatric trauma3.12.7 Orthopedics/rheumatology: 3.12.7.1 Describe the indications for, know when a surgical consultation is warranted, and demonstrate the ability to perform and/or explain in detail the following surgical and emergency procedures related to orthopedics: 3.12.7.1.1 Casting and splinting 3.12.7.1.2 Joint and bursal aspiration 3.12.7.2Describe and discuss common surgical and emergency conditions their presentation, differential diagnosis, diagnostic criteria, labs and special studies, appropriate referral, and treatment for the following: 3.12.7.2.1 Orthopedic injuries
  24. 24. 3.12.7.2.2 Strains and sprains 3.12.7.2.3 Fractures 3.12.7.2.4 Compartment syndromes 3.12.7.2.5 Rhabdomyolysis 3.12.7.2.6 Joint pain 3.12.7.2.7 Emergencies in systemic rheumatic disease 3.12.7.2.8 Soft tissue problems 4. Student Activities and Experiences (Instructional techniques)4.19Case studies that provide opportunity to analyze clinical correlations4.20Guided faculty Lecture4.21Group discussion4.22Independent reading assignments4.23Patient vignettes to synthesize and integrate the materials into a real life clinical context.4.24Integrated computer technology will be utilized to enhance learning.4.25Faculty demonstration of procedures and diagnostic techniques4.26Hands-on experience through the use of simulated patients and procedures4.27Collaborative experience will be gained through cooperative laboratory learning groups5. Assessment Techniques 5.11Comprehensive final examination (30% of total grade) 5.12End of module practical exams and demonstrations of procedures (30 % of total grade) 5.13Cooperative Group Clinical correlation case studies given each module (15 % of total grade) 5.14Pre-Prep Notes (15 % of total grade) 5.15Full attendance and participation with professional behavior (10 % of total grade)6. Grading: Examinations and quizzes will be based on classroom lectures, assignments, and textbook material. The ability to synthesize and manipulate concepts as they relate
  25. 25. to clinical situations will be emphasized. Exams may be multiple choice, short answer, essay, practical, problem based, true and false, matching, or fill-in-the-blank. Students will refer to the academic bulletin and the PA department grading policies for requirements for progression in the PA program. Grades are based not only on exam performance but on Pre-prep notes, Cooperative Group Assignments, and attendance with participation. 7. Course grades: are calculated on a percentage basis. All final course grade percentages are rounded to the nearest integer. (XX.50% or higher is rounded up to the next higher integer. XX.49% or less is rounded down.) Final course grades are assigned according to the following academic standards: Didactic & Research Courses Percent Grade Letter Grade 90 – 100 A student has exceeded expectations 80 – 89 B student has met expectations 70-79 C student is below expectations Less than 70 F student has failed expectations An “I” may be temporarily awarded to individuals who fail to complete course requirements within the defined time. A final grade of “F” in any PA course is a non-passing grade and results in automatic and immediate dismissal from the PA Program. 8. Tentative Schedule: Module Dates Lecture and discussion TOPICS Endocrine August 25-September 10 Emergency and surgery related to the Endocrine system Nephrology September 13-27 Emergency and surgery related to NephrologyUrology and men’s September 28-October 5 Emergency and surgery related to health Urological and men’s healthGYN and women’s October 5-13 Emergency and surgery related to GYN and health women’s health topics OB October 18-26 Emergency and surgery related to Ob Pediatrics October 27-November 10 Emergency and surgery related to Pediatrics
  26. 26. Rheumatology November 15-23 Emergency and surgery related to RheumatologyOrthopedics November 29-December 8 Emergency and surgery related to orthopedics December 10 Cumulative Final9. Pre-Prep Note system: This learning and evaluation method is an effective vehicle for students to prepare for in-class discussions and maximize learning styles. By participating in the Pre-Prep note system, the student will be using multiple learning methods; such as, reading, writing, kinesthetic, and connecting the knowledge with in- class clinical discussions. Students will write an average of one page of pre-prep notes for each topic assigned that day using the template outlined below. Students can use all reading resources. If any topic assigned for a particular day does not have a specific reading assignment in the required textbooks for the course, the student can use internet database or other resources. The faculty will supplement resources as needed if the textbooks have an inadequate amount of information for assigned topics. 8.5 Template for Pre-Prep Notes: 8.5.1 Definition 8.5.2 Etiology 8.5.3 Pathogenesis 8.5.4 Clinical symptoms 8.5.5 Physical Examination (PE) 8.5.6 Differential Diagnoses (at least 3) 8.5.7 Evaluation with a diagnostic approach i.e. history, PE, laboratory studies, X-ray, CT, MRI, etc. 8.5.8 Treatment 8.5.9 Rehabilitation/referral to specialists if applicable 8.6 Evaluation of Pre-Prep Notes: Students will be required to compile pre-prep notes for every designated topic assigned for certain class periods. At the completion of each module and on the date of the written exam, students will turn in their binders for faculty to review. This assignment is considered a learning method and completion demonstrates competency. The students are encouraged to organize the pre-prep notes in a system that best supports his/her learning style. Examples might include organizing into a chart or table. The final product should be a vehicle to assist the student when studying for course exams and ultimately for the PANCE exam. The pre-prep notes should be considered a portfolio where the information is organized into a binder with materials that might include the recommended template written prior to class, and the class notes that can be combined into an
  27. 27. organized format. The assignment might be expressed in a variety of methods. 8.6.1 Faculty will review each student’s pre-prep notes for the following: 8.6.1.1 Completeness: each topic assigned must have an organized pre-prep note. The pre-prep notes may be combined with course handouts to provide a better system to study for examinations 8.6.1.2 Clarity: students must follow some recognizable system. 8.6.1.3 Depth and Breadth: There is no exact length for each topic, but about 1 to 1½ pages for each topic should be the approximate amount in typed form. Charts or tables can be used if indicated. Course notes can be combined with pre-prep notes. 8.2.2 Faculty will review the student’s pre-prep notes at the conclusion of each module. If the portfolio is incomplete and has no organized system the faculty reserves the right to require further organization or improvement to receive full credit. This system is meant to enhance learning and not to be unnecessary extra work. The faculty will award full credit for this assignment unless the student fails to show adequate effort, does not hand in their binder by the end of the school day of the module’s exam, or refuses to turn in the pre-prep notes at which time, the student will receive a “0” as their Pre-prep note component grade.10. Cooperative Learning Assignments: Cooperative learning is the instructional use of small groups that allows students to work together to maximize their own and each others’ learning. The cooperative learning method uses a group study task structure with an incentive structure in which students receive a group reward for a group product. This involves a high degree of cooperation between students. Assignments will be case-based upon the module that is being completed. Grades will be based on the accuracy and the completeness of the group’s responses to the questions in each case. Each group will receive one grade for the cases (each member will receive that grade therefore, it is expected that each member contribute fully to this group assignment).11. Academic Honesty PolicyAt a Christian liberal arts university, committed to the pursuit of truth and understanding,any act of academic dishonesty is especially distressing and cannot be tolerated. In general,academic dishonesty involves the abuse and misuse of information or people to gain anundeserved academic advantage or evaluation. The common forms of academic dishonestyinclude:
  28. 28. a. Cheating: using deception in the taking of tests or the preparation of written work, using unauthorized materials, copying another person’s work with or without consent, or assisting another in such activities; b. Lying: falsifying fabricating, or forging information in either written or spoken presentations; c. Plagiarism: using the published writings, data, interpretations of ideas of another without proper documentationEpisodes of academic dishonesty are reported to the Vice President for Academic Affairs.The potential penalty for academic dishonesty includes 1. a failing grade on a particular assignment 2. a failing grade for the entire course 3. charges against the student with the appropriate disciplinary body.12. ADA Statement a. In accordance with Americans with Disabilities Act, any student in this class who has a documented learning disability will be provided with treasonable accommodations designed to meet his/her needs. Before any such assistance can occur, it is the responsibility of the student to see that documentation is on file with Academic Affairs. I you have documented special needs you must make them known to the instructor prior to the third week of class13. Emergency Contact a. All cell phones and pagers need to remain OFF during lectures and labs, Monday through Friday. If someone needs to reach you during that time, the administrative assistant for the program will take any important phone messages.

×