Crisis comms presentation

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Presentation at media relations course at Ontario Provincial Police

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  • Here’s a brief overview of what we’ll cover today … Don’t hesitate to interrupt me !
  • Two perspective: from our audiences and from our own. To succeed we need to ensure that our audiences will hear what we’re saying … That’s the reason for using a crisis communications approach!
  • What I’m talking about this morning is about events or incidents where you might be called upon to act as a PIO. Not quite the same thing as day-to-day media relations on police operations or investigations.
  • Model helps ensure critical elements of a successful communications response: coordination of messaging consistency of messaging accuracy of messaging
  • People can now share their own experience directly with each other … and information … a challenge. now at least one third of our audience does not get its information from traditional media: print, TV or radio
  • watch video … Google “socialnomics” and Erik Qualman …
  • Everyone armed with a phone/camera Twitter used extensively during the Mumbai crisis … 80 messages from witnesses every 5 seconds ! + blogs from hostages ! Also used to direct blood donors to specific hospitals and provide contact numbers … But also used by bad guys in India to direct terrorists to people hiding out in hotel rooms.
  • authorities criticized for waiting hours to respond to incidents … pressure is increasing: US Airways took heat for waiting for 13 minutes to put out information after one of its planes landed in the Hudson River in New York.
  • use all tools are our disposal: websites, blogs and whole slew of social media platforms AND the traditional media …. They are still useful and places where people look for info.
  • Be there and be relevant … don’t participate and be ignored You have the info … present best face on your response
  • Forget the normal way you do things … Can’t think the same way or say things the same way … Because your audience WILL NOT think the same way they normally do !
  • A communications response to a crisis must be: immediate … occupy the public space … because of social media being out there with relevant, accurate information within minutes will go a long way to establish your voice as one of authority … people will then look for you !
  • All the pieces fit together. Don’t just focus on the tools: twitter, website or facebook. Ensure you have the right plan, with the right people … with the right training and the right messaging in place !!!
  • Proven record … lots of scientific evidence and research behind it. Used by many large government organizations involved in emergency response/management. Based on differences in how our brains process information in routine situations and during a crisis or stressful times. Let me explain …
  • Proven record … lots of scientific evidence and research behind it. Used by many large government organizations involved in emergency response/management. Based on differences in how our brains process information in routine situations and during a crisis or stressful times. Let me explain …
  • Brains turn mushy … diminished ability to process and retain info
  • Media clips: about 9 seconds North American: 3 words/second Three quotes/key messages in print stories ORDER: What’s heard first as most important … heard last = second most important … heard in middle = third most important … arrange message map accordingly
  • Normally in the OPS we write for about grade 8 level … papers, usually between grade 6 (sun) and grade 8 (star/globe) … academic paper: much higher … During crisis: write for grade 2 or 3 to ensure right comprehension No jargon, no technical terms
  • Foleyet train in quarantine Possible bio threat Here’s how we handled it
  • Perception is reality
  • “ I feel your pain” … Establish emotional connection if possible …
  • Prepare message maps on all your hazards … risk-specific communications Ensure you have trained spokespeople exercise key crisis communications components regularly … as part of exercise program crises will happen … are you prepared?
  • Prepare message maps on all your hazards … risk-specific communications Ensure you have trained spokespeople exercise key crisis communications components regularly … as part of exercise program crises will happen … are you prepared?
  • Crisis comms presentation

    1. 1. Introduction to Crisis Communications Ontario Provincial Police December 2009
    2. 2. Today’s presentation <ul><li>Introduction </li></ul><ul><li>IMS and Public Information Officers </li></ul><ul><li>Changing expectations and the impact of social media </li></ul><ul><li>How to meet these new challenges </li></ul><ul><li>Message mapping </li></ul><ul><li>Conclusion and questions </li></ul>
    3. 3. Introduction <ul><li>Patrice Cloutier </li></ul><ul><li>Co-author Provincial Emergency Information Plan </li></ul><ul><li>Coordination of the planning/delivery of emergency information at provincial level </li></ul><ul><li>Currently seconded to OPP for G8 </li></ul>
    4. 4. Introduction <ul><li>What is emergency information? </li></ul><ul><li>What our audiences need to know to protect themselves, their families, property and the environment. </li></ul><ul><li>What we need to communicate to help ensure our audiences will adopt the right behaviour during a crisis or emergency. </li></ul>
    5. 5. Introduction - IMS
    6. 6. In Ontario
    7. 7. The New Media revolution Where are you?
    8. 8. It’s not stopping! Years to Reach 50 millions Users:  Radio (38 Years), TV (13 Years), Internet (4 Years), iPod (3 Years)…Facebook added 100 million users in less than 9 months…iPhone applications downloads hit 1 billion in 9 months. The fastest growing segment on Facebook is 55-65 year-old females
    9. 9. Everyone is a reporter <ul><li>Instantaneous Information </li></ul><ul><ul><li>New media and mobile phones </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Even traditional media taking it up </li></ul></ul>
    10. 10. Changing expectations <ul><li>Audiences expect a response from authorities within minutes. </li></ul>
    11. 11. Changing expectations <ul><li>Audiences expect information offered on many different platforms. </li></ul><ul><li>A participative approach in communications. </li></ul><ul><li>Trust and credibility </li></ul>
    12. 12. New Media and your response <ul><li>One choice: to participate or not … Occupy the space. </li></ul><ul><li>Tone is important: conversational approach </li></ul>
    13. 13. What’s a crisis? <ul><li>What’s a crisis? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Surprise </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Public scrutiny </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Media coverage </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Not routine </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Loss of control </li></ul></ul>
    14. 14. Meeting the new challenges <ul><li>Why use a crisis communications approach? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ensure effective communications and that your audience adopt the right behaviour. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Enhances your capacity to offer a prompt communications response to incidents and crises </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Helps establish an organization’s credibility. </li></ul></ul>
    15. 15. Crisis communications planning <ul><li>The Four “Ps” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Plans </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>People </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Prepare </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Practice </li></ul></ul>
    16. 16. Message Mapping <ul><li>Crisis communications technique </li></ul><ul><li>Message mapping </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Science-based … on target messaging </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Easy to use …. Visual representation </li></ul></ul><ul><li>You can anticipate questions/issues and develop key messaging ahead of time on multiple scenarios. </li></ul>
    17. 17. Message Mapping <ul><li>Crisis communications technique developed by Dr. Vincent Covelo from New York. </li></ul><ul><li>Advised Mayor Giuliani prior to 9-11 </li></ul><ul><li>Successful communications response using message mapping </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Message maps pre-approved </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Trained people </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Lots of prior exercises </li></ul></ul>
    18. 18. Message Mapping: Prepare! <ul><li>If you want to communicate promptly, you need to have pre-approved messages ready! </li></ul>
    19. 19. Routine vs Crisis <ul><li>To be heard, you need to craft the right messages! </li></ul>
    20. 20. Brain Processes <ul><li>What it means for communicators … the rule of 27/9/3 </li></ul>
    21. 21. The rule of 3 <ul><li>27/9/3 model: a critical tool </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Media: broadcast and print </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Matches what brain retains during crises </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Allows for easy very visual structure </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Based on rule of 3: three key messages each with three supporting messages or key facts </li></ul></ul><ul><li>What’s also important? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The order of your messages … </li></ul></ul>
    22. 22. Other obstacle <ul><li>Comprehension levels </li></ul>
    23. 23. Message Map Example
    24. 24. Delivery <ul><li>Verbal vs non-verbal </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Things are totally reversed. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Routine: 75% verbal and 25 % non-verbal </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Crisis: 75% non-verbal and 25% verbal </li></ul></ul><ul><li>What’s also important? Show poise! </li></ul>
    25. 25. Feel … No Mr. Roboto <ul><li>Compassion, Competence, Optimism </li></ul>
    26. 26. A textbook case http:// Newsmaker of the year   May 2008 August 2008 January 2009 Good opinion 74% 57% 88% Bad opinion 7 34 7
    27. 27. In Summary <ul><li>Anticipate </li></ul><ul><li>Prepare </li></ul><ul><li>Practice </li></ul><ul><li>Questions ??? </li></ul>
    28. 28. Resources http://cops2point0.com http://crisisblogger.wordpress.com http://crisiscommscp.blogspot.com (my own blog) http://mashable.com for all social media stuff

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