Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Lean + UX + Agile: Putting It All Together

19,649 views

Published on

Lean Startup, Pragmatic Marketing, User Experience Design and Agile Development are all approaches to improve your odds of creating successful products.

Are they mutually exclusive, or can you assemble them together to make a lean, mean product success machine?

Pathfinder Software's Amy Willis (UX) Bernhard Kappe (Products Strategy) and Reid MacTavish (Agile Development) share their lessons learned in making lean+ux+agile work.

Published in: Technology, Business
  • So many acronyms. if one is indeed 'new', these may possibly be barriers to adoption. It seems this very slideshow doesn't it's contents....lol
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Slide 38 is a nice slide that shows all the key parts for CustDev and AgileDev. Slides 62-64 show how iterations are deployed and divided into design, implementation, and acceptance test.
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here

Lean + UX + Agile: Putting It All Together

  1. 1. Lean + UX + Agile: Putting It All TogetherRocket FuelFor Your ProductGrowthLean Startup Strategy Amy Willis Bernhard Kappe Reid MacTavishUser Experience Design Lead UX Designer Founder and CEO Senior Agile PM awillis@pathf.com bkappe@pathf.com rmactavish@pathf.comAgile Software Development 312.372.1058 x 6002 @bernhardkappeCustomer Acquisition and Retention pathfindersoftware.com/blog http://pathfindersoftware.com http://pathfindersoftware.com Copyright © 2011 Pathfinder Software
  2. 2. Pathfinder: 300+ Successful Releases
  3. 3. A typical waterfall project produces pages and page of end-to-endrequirements for the entire project as it is envisioned (but not necessarilyas it will be built). The people compiling these requirements are, ofcourse, part of an assembly with only the most cursory involvement withothers outside their department.
  4. 4. After all 9,238 lbs. of paper are heaved over the wall with a hearty“good luck!” and a cheery wave, the silos are once again in placeand silence is golden.
  5. 5. The development team begins. As they develop, they beginto see gaps, inconsistencies and missing requirements.The timeline starts to stretch out...
  6. 6. After a long march, the software can be shown to the stakeholders.It’s not what they expected, and it’s not what they want. The softwarerequirements need to be changed. The project falls further behind ...
  7. 7. The team size is doubled, but strangely, things don’t move faster.
  8. 8. When QA starts, lots of bugs are discovered, and when those arefixed, more bugs crop up. The project is way behind and way overbudget, but finally launches.
  9. 9. 3 months after launch. Customers aren’t buying it. It’s not what theyneed (even though they requested all of the features.) The few thatuse it only use 20% of the features.
  10. 10. What went wrong?
  11. 11. Diagnosis I: A Failure to Communicate • No one reads the requirements and specifications • Requirements documents don’t let you visualize or experience the solution • Real feedback and communication between stakeholders is too little, too late • Software product development is inherently uncertain - change is inevitable. • Set up for failure: finger pointing instead of teamwork.“Hi Jim, Please Review For Today’s Meeting”
  12. 12. Agile• Self organizing teams• Deliver working software every one to two weeks• Just enough documentation• Get feedback, adjust to change, improve your processes
  13. 13. Feedback Loop
  14. 14. Diagnosis II: Bad Usability Problems: • Software isn’t intuitive to use • Software doesn’t take the user into account: their needs, their knowledge base, their environment, the flow of their activity, the way they behave • Software is written for the stakeholders not the actual users.
  15. 15. What’s it called?
  16. 16. User Experience DesignFocus:Optimize the product around how users can, want, or need to use the product,rather than forcing the users to change their behavior to accommodate the product.Process:• Who are your users?• Learn as much as you can about them in the context of the problem you’re trying to solve for them/their goals.• Take that + knowledge of design best practices, cognition/psychology, ergonomics, sociology, etc. to design solutions that help them meet their goals.• Test the validity of assumptions with regards to user behavior and effectiveness of designs in real world tests with actual users.
  17. 17. Diagnosis III: No One CaresNo one asked: “Is this problem worth solving?” “Does anyone care about your solution?”
  18. 18. 9 Out of 10New Products Fail http://pathfindersoftware.com Copyright © 2011 Pathfinder Software
  19. 19. Business Model Problem Solution Unique Value Unfair Customer Proposition Advantage Segments Top 3 Problems Top 3 features that address the problem Single, clear, Can’t be easily Target Customers compelling message copied or bought why you are different and worth buying Key Activities Channel Activity that drives Path to customers acquisition/revenue for marketing and sales Cost Structure Revenue Model• Customer acquisition costs • Revenue Model• Distribution costs • Lifetime Value• Hosting • Revenue• People, etc. • Gross Margin
  20. 20. Existing Products: Validated Model Problem Solution Unique Value Unfair Customer Proposition Advantage Segments Top 3 Problems Top 3 features that address the problem Single, clear, Can’t be easily Target Customers ✔ ✔ compelling message copied or bought why you are different and worth buying ✔ ✔ Key Activities Channel Activity that drives acquisition/revenue ✔ Path to customers for marketing and ✔ ✔ sales Cost Structure Revenue Model• Customer acquisition costs • Revenue Model• Distribution costs• Hosting• People, etc. ✔ • Lifetime Value • Revenue • Gross Margin ✔
  21. 21. New Product: Uncertainty ? Problem Solution Unique Value Unfair Customer Proposition Advantage Segments ? Top 3 Problems Top 3 features that address the problem Single, clear, Can’t be easily Target Customers ? compelling message copied or bought ? why you are different and worth buying ? ? Key Activities Channel ? Activity that drives Path to customers acquisition/revenue for marketing and sales Cost Structure Revenue Model ? ?• Customer acquisition costs • Revenue Model• Distribution costs • Lifetime Value• Hosting • Revenue• People, etc. • Gross Margin
  22. 22. Your Job as an Entrepreneur: Discover a Business Model that works before you run out of Money and Time. (Then scale it.)
  23. 23. Feedback Loop
  24. 24. Customer/Problem Hypotheses Problem Solution Unique Value Unfair Customer Proposition Advantage Segments Top 3 Problems Top 3 features that address the problem Single, clear, Can’t be easily Target Customers compelling message copied or bought ? why you are different and worth buying ? ? Key Activities Channel ? Activity that drives acquisition/revenue ? Path to customers for marketing and sales ? ? Cost Structure Revenue Model• Customer acquisition costs • Revenue Model• Distribution costs • Lifetime Value• Hosting• People, etc. ? • Revenue • Gross Margin ?
  25. 25. Problem Interviews• Customer Demographics 1 4 (Discover Subsegments)• Validate Their Top Three Problems• Discover New Problems 2 5• Rank the Problems• How Do They Solve Them Now? 3
  26. 26. Solution Hypotheses Problem Solution Unique Value Unfair Customer Proposition Advantage Segments Top 3 Problems Top 3 features that address the problem Single, clear, Can’t be easily Target Customers compelling message copied or bought ? why you are different and worth buying ? ? Key Activities Channel ? Activity that drives acquisition/revenue ? Path to customers for marketing and sales ? ? Cost Structure Revenue Model• Customer acquisition costs • Revenue Model• Distribution costs • Lifetime Value• Hosting• People, etc. ? • Revenue • Gross Margin ?
  27. 27. Solution Design
  28. 28. Solution Interviews• Recap Demographics and Problem• Describe and Show Solution (don’t 1 4 sell it!)• Does it Resonate? 2• What’s most important, what’s missing, what can you take away? 5• How do they find out about solutions to this problem? 3 6• Will they pay $X?
  29. 29. Drill down toMinimum Viable Product (MVP) 1 4 2 5 X 3 X 6
  30. 30. Customer DiscoveryBusiness Model Problem Generation Interviews MVP Solution Solution Design Interviews
  31. 31. Example MVPQuestion: Are enough people interested in our service?Measure: People signing up for the productExperiment:• Create a video of clicking through visual mockups• Post it on a landing page with a sign up button• Post and promote on Digg, Hacker News, etc.
  32. 32. Example MVPResult: 90,000 Signups in less than three daysDevelopment completed 18 months later
  33. 33. Example MVP
  34. 34. More on MVP• Not one snapshot, but a progression of experiments• At some point, you need to start development. That’s where Agile comes in
  35. 35. Lean Startup: Two Fast Feedback Loops
  36. 36. CustDev + UX + Agile Customer Development UX Agile Development
  37. 37. Lean Startup = Custdev + UX + AgileCustomer Development Agile Development Business Model Problem Agile Agile Generation Interviews Inception Development Path to Product Market Fit 9000 6750 4500 2250 0 Month 1 Month 6 Month 11 Solution Solution Metrics and MVP Design Interviews A/B Testing
  38. 38. Workflow analysis (as is, to be) Personas and Goals User Stories INCEPTION WORKSHOPS “Breadth” Visualization orPreparation for Iteration 1 Storyboarding Estimating and Prioritization CONDUCT WORKSHOPS TO BRING THE VISION TO LIFE
  39. 39. Personas and Goals Workshop Who: UXD, PM, Visual Designer, Lead Developer, Client•Determine the universe of people that are using or influencing the use of the product•Persona is a “representative” for each type of user•Allows for easy reference in future discussions•Includes stock photo, goals, major tasks, etc.
  40. 40. Workflows Workshop Who: UXD, PM, Visual Designer, Lead Developer, Client•Determine all of the workflows for each persona.•No activity should reside outside of a flow.
  41. 41. Why do Flows Make or Break a Project?• Help with prioritization - identify the most frequent or important flows. What are people doing 80% of the time?• Make sure important options aren’t forgotten• Confirm with the client we did not forget anything
  42. 42. USER STORIES WORKSHOP Who: UXD, PM, Visual Designer, Lead Developer, Client• Starting from the workflows, create a list of user stories for each feature. The format is: As a <persona>, I want to <do something> so I can <achieve something>• This is the master story list (MSL)
  43. 43. “BREADTH” VISUALIZATION or STORYBOARD WORKSHOP Who: UXD, PM, Visual Designer, Lead Developer, Client• Break the user story list into sections (probably flows).• Create low-fi, REALLY low-fi pictures of each screen. A quick sketch with a sharpie on an 8.5 x 11 paper is all you need• Visualize, don’t design! These pictures are not designs. They don’t have to be efficient or good from a UX perspective. The key is to visualize with speed, not design.• Everyone involved participates, including the client• the functionality is completely represented. you may come up with new stories as you go• Now go through the story list and write the name of each story on its appropriate page on the wall. No doubt, in doing this you will add new stories and find some that did not get visualized (you’ll need to make pictures for those)• Once a wall is built, write story numbers on the pictures from the MSL (master story list). As you do, you will likely come up with more stories. Also, the pictures will often suggest stories you have missed. This cross check between the stories and pictures is a great method to insure the scope of the project is well understood by everyone.
  44. 44. ESTIMATING AND PRIORITIZATION WORKSHOP Who: UXD, PM, Visual Designer (optional), Lead Developer, Client•Estimate the point value of each story.•Next, prioritize each story as High, Medium or Low.•Order the stories such that the early iterations give thedesigner time for more refinement of the overall concept.
  45. 45. PREPARATION FOR ITERATION 1 Who: UXD, PM, Visual Designer (optional), Lead Developer, Client•Wireframes•Acceptance tests
  46. 46. Wireframes
  47. 47. Acceptance Tests
  48. 48. Good Inception1. In workshops, get things DONE2. Avoid the tangents and rabbit holes during workshops3. Plan in advance all the needed workshops
  49. 49. Agile Iterations
  50. 50. WaterfallRequirements Gathering Design Implementation Test
  51. 51. Getting from Point A to Point B BA
  52. 52. How to get there?Waterfall
  53. 53. How to get there?Waterfall Agile
  54. 54. Launch BA
  55. 55. Paddle BA
  56. 56. How does this work? BA
  57. 57. The Agile ManifestoIndividuals and interactions over processes and toolsWorking software over comprehensive documentationCustomer collaboration over contract negotiationResponding to change over following a planhttp://agilemanifesto.org/
  58. 58. Anatomy of a User Story Persona Goal Benefit =“As a clinician, I want to see my patient’s test results so thatI can understand their health status” 1 2 3 5
  59. 59. Acceptance CriteriaEach story isaccompanied with explicitcriteria that help us definebeing “Done”*Given* X*When* Y*Then* Z
  60. 60. Life of a StoryDesign Implementation Acceptance Test Done1 53 23 12 5
  61. 61. Iteration Iteration Planning Meeting (IPM) 1 2 Review2 weeks Showcase Planning
  62. 62. IterationDesign stories here … IPM 1 2 … so they can be Preview period implemented and tested here
  63. 63. Team CompositionDesign Implementation Test2 UXD 4 devs 1 QA1 BA1 PO PM
  64. 64. Zoom Out – Release TimelineInception Agile Iterations Release Target ... Intended functionality
  65. 65. Engineering practices   • Test-Driven Development (TDD)• Pair-programming • Continuous Integration and Alpha Environment
  66. 66. UltimateMVP Product
  67. 67. Qualitative Learning Ultimate Product MVP Qualitative and Quantitative Learning
  68. 68. Fast feedbackResponding to changeWorking code delivering business value
  69. 69. Launch!(The team waves bye bye)
  70. 70. Product/Market Fit Path to Product Market Fit9000 Customer Acquisition Cost Customer Lifetime Value/3 You Are Here67504500 You Need to Get Here! Product/Market Fit:2250 LTV/3 >= CAC 0 Month 1 Month 2 Month 3 Month 6 Month 5 Month 6 Month ? Month 8 Month 9 Month 16 Month 11 Month 12
  71. 71. Post Launch Goal:Increase LTV and Decrease CACDecrease CAC Increase LTV• Changes to messaging • Improve value to customer• Changes to marketing • Add features channels • Improve Features• Does the Experience Match the Marketing? • Remove features• Changes to Optimize • Find and foster loyalty Customer Acquisition Funnel/ behaviors Experience for New Users
  72. 72. Post Launch Fast Feedback Loops• You have real users and precise usage data on individuals - analyze it!• Make small changes fast (hours, not weeks to get into production)• When you make changes - A/B test (or do multivariate if you have big enough volumes.)
  73. 73. Build Metrics Into Your MVP
  74. 74. Lean Startup = Custdev + UX + AgileCustomer Development Agile Development Business Model Problem Agile Agile Generation Interviews Inception Development Path to Product Market Fit 9000 6750 4500 2250 0 Month 1 Month 6 Month 11 Solution Solution Metrics and MVP Design Interviews A/B Testing
  75. 75. Want to learn more on Lean + UX + Agile? Half Day Workshop on Friday, January 20th • Details on lean startup as well as pragmatic marketingRocket Fuel approachFor Your Product • More details on how to run a successful inceptionGrowth • More details on agile techniquesLean Startup StrategyUser Experience Design • Metrics, Continuous Deployment, A/B testingAgile Software Development • Whom to hire and how to recruitCustomer Acquisition and Retention http://pathfinderleanux.eventbrite.com/ http://pathfindersoftware.com http://pathfindersoftware.com Copyright © 2011 Pathfinder Software
  76. 76. Lean + UX + Agile: Putting It All TogetherRocket FuelFor Your ProductGrowthLean Startup Strategy Amy Willis Bernhard Kappe Reid MacTavishUser Experience Design Lead UX Designer Founder and CEO Senior Agile PM awillis@pathf.com bkappe@pathf.com rmactavish@pathf.comAgile Software Development 312.372.1058 x 6002 @bernhardkappeCustomer Acquisition and Retention pathfindersoftware.com/blog http://pathfindersoftware.com http://pathfindersoftware.com Copyright © 2011 Pathfinder Software

×