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Final Wayfinding Book

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Final Wayfinding Book

  1. 1. GdAM GETTING THERE GdAM Environmental Design + Wayfinding 1
  2. 2. GdAM GETTING THERE rethinking wayfinding at northeastern Pamela Andrade Sara LaPorte Graphic design, Architecture & Multimedia Amanda Athanasiou Erica LeLievre students came together in the inaugural offering of Alison Baggen Tim Loranger “Environmental design” to form an interdisciplinary Laura Bernstein Britt Soler studio. Our task was to re-envision wayfinding at the Emily Czarnecki Kate Terrado university. This book represents our recommendations Alexander Davis Alex Turnwall for new wayfinding initiatives, and an overview of the Brett Eksuzian Ryan Sullivan, research that got us there. Geoff House instructor Spring 2010
  3. 3. THE RESEARCH PROCESS 1. Discipline-based 2. Human-centered research 3. Synthesis knowledge gathering We began by doing what we each did Our first interdisciplinary research, bro- Amalgamation: through a shared pro- best – researching our own areas of ex- ken into groups that each had a different cess, overlapping human-centered pertise. What did Northeastern currently way of exploring the connections that insights were revealed. do? What are some precedents that we people had to campus. should look at or avoid? LOOK Observe the way that user groups DESIGN Branding standards, sign-making interact with the campus as an environ- process, current state of wayfinding at ment, both physically and virtually. Northeastern. ACT Interact with other systems that may ARCHITECTURE Morphology, urban form, shed some light on how we can improve pedestrian traffic, green space. our own. INTERACTIVE Web, mobile, kiosks. ASK Conduct interviews and hand out blank maps that will tell about user ex- periences with campus wayfinding.
  4. 4. CONTENTS research 1 why wayfinding? 2 wayfinding defined 3 research methodology 4 key insights solutions 13 1 the system 28 2 a smart campus 43 3 greeters 52 4 boundaries 59 5 social spaces 64 6 columbus connection 72 7 tunnels 75 8 sharing space 78 9 northeastern avenue
  5. 5. WHAT IS WAYFINDING, EXACTLY? When we speak about wayfinding It’s a system-based approach It’s physical It’s also digital in terms of design, we are simply By setting up rules for an entire The most obvious application is on cam- New technologies can make wayfinding talking about the system of tools wayfinding system, we can ensure pus signage. But think about the breadth more intuitive by giving the user real- consistent delivery across applications of applications there: time feedback. Still, these technologies that help direct a person from one – even those we might not know about must fit in with the physical elements. point to the next. The most obvi- currently. Consider: Directionals On-Campus Maps Northeastern Website ous example of this is the tradi- Brand + Identity System Personal printed maps iPhone app tional signage system. Typography guidelines Building signs other mobile apps? Photography guidelines Flags on street poles Displays screens Materials usage/procurement Room signs Kiosks But wayfinding today is not so ob- Sign shop Parking lots/garages Facebook & Social Media vious. There are complex systems, External building treatments Sports venues MBTA stations diverse user groups and different On-campus businesses kinds of technology. Our research In-building signage and experience in our individual disciplices yielded these areas of focus: 6 GdAM Environmental Design + Wayfinding
  6. 6. WHAT’S THE REAL NEED FOR WAYFINDING? To direct people To enhance user experience To attract “customers” This may seem like the most obvious Even if people can eventually find their A university has many potential “custom- reason, but it proves harder in practice. way from point A to point B, there still ers”. These may be potential students We found out that Northeastern can be may be an easier way to go about doing and their parents, investors, professors, an especially hard place to find your way so. If people can navigate their way the surrounding community – there is around and without a wayfinding system, around without really having to give it an endless list of stakeholders. If the people get frustrated and lost! any thought, then the system is working physical space on campus does not look properly. If they have to struggle – even a professional, you run the risk of loosing a bit – something can likely be improved. customer. By giving users the best system, you en- This may seem superficial, but think sure that they have the best experience. about it this way, have you been to an airport or subway station and felt lost? Did that experience make you harbor negative feelings towards that place, activity or organization? Feeling lost or unable to navigate can be a frustrating feeling and that can easily be associated with the organization that maintains that space. To minimize the possibility for this – intuitive wayfind sys- tems that are professional and reflect the University’s brand should be considered. GdAM Environmental Design + Wayfinding 7
  7. 7. KEY INSIGHTS Boundaries Orientation A core requirement of our research was The idea behind this goal is to retain In general, physical orientation is crucial User routes are complex, involving to focus on the needs of campus. We Northeastern’s identity as a university, to a user’s ability to understand and many turns, shortcuts, longcuts, and identified many different user groups, while at the same time, effectively inte- successfully navigate their environment. non-orthogonal paths. broke up users into different categories, grating the campus into the surrounding By creating a frame of reference we ordered and re-ordered them. In the end, communities. are able to orient ourselves in a space Many of the landmarks people use to although we realize there are more spe- and effectively move from one point to navigate campus are unexpected and cific needs, we used a broad approach to We understand the intentions of the NU another. challenge what we traditionally think begin categorizing needs. Planning department and wayfinding of as a landmark. committee to have similar intentions. This is the foundation of wayfinding. Surprisingly, even daily, experienced Getting lost affects practical day to day users of the campus still felt lost in At northeastern there are a unique set routines, but It can also affect people sections that were outside of their daily of factors that shape the way physical more abstractly by changing the way “comfort zone.” Because of this trend, orientation happens and the adverse they feel about a place. we began to see how we would have to reactions that occur when people can’t design a system that worked for a variety orient themselves of users. 8 GdAM Environmental Design + Wayfinding
  8. 8. Consistency Pathmaking We visited six different campuses in the To improve wayfinding on campus, we greater Boston area to get a general idea should adapt to the way frequent users of how schools give themselves an image already use campus spaces. and identity. The map to the right depicts the paths that frequent users take. Through internet sources, on campus buildings, and signage we found some schools had better wayfinding systems than others. Northeastern should use consistency throughout campus but as a tool, not an overall goal. Using consistency as a tool will allow for creativity in the production of an identity on campus. GdAM Environmental Design + Wayfinding 9
  9. 9. COMMUNITY MEMBER THE HUMAN PERSPECTIVE Just your average day... To illustrate how real people – the very people we researched – would use our wayfinding system, we have a few story lines spread throughout the book. Each story represents a persona of someone in one of our target audiences. 1 There are three events that our six char- acters are travelling to: a lecture, an art exhibit and a hockey game. 3.1 LECTURER NU STUDENT 1 2 8 9 2 7 5.2 2 5.1 1 1 9 3.2 PARENT BU STUDENT 4 3 6.2 6.1 10 GdAM Environmental Design + Wayfinding NU STUDENT
  10. 10. THE LECTURE THE ART EXHIBIT THE HOCKEY GAME Visiting lecturer Parent Community member Our lecturer has never been to North- Our parent is an infrequent visitor to The community member frequently easter. He’s arriving on the T and he has campus. She is driving to the parking passes through campus, but has no di- a smart phone. garage and then going to the art gallery. rect affilitation with the university, other than the fact that he likes hockey. He’s headed to the game on foot. Northeastern student Northeastern student 2 Other student visitors This student lives in Northeastern hous- Our second student comes to camp[us We have a student visting from another ing on Columbus Ave. She’s headed to by foot and is headed to the art gallery. college who is trying to find his way to the lecture and walks to get there. the hockey game as well. He took the orange line to Ruggle to get to campus.
  11. 11. 12 GdAM Environmental Design + Wayfinding
  12. 12. 1 The System BRIEF: The most obvious aspect of wayfinding is signage, and this includes a wide breadth of applications. The objective is to not only dictate where these signs would be most useful, but also to determine the formal characteristics that would make the sign most effective in a user’s decision- making process. SOLUTION: The end goal is to have a user comfort- ably and successfully navigate the environment. There should never be a point of confusion in the user’s experience and signage should never been seen as obtrusive. NARRATIVE: A BU student is on his way to the hockey game. He is unfamiliar with the campus and gets confused about the location of Mat- thews. However, he sees a directional sign and continues on. Elsewhere, a community member finds an interac- tive kiosk and sees that there is a hockey game. He gets directions and makes his way to Mat- thews. A parent going to the art gallery sees a map that assists her in finding her way to the gallery.
  13. 13. TYPOGRAPHY ITC New Baskerville and Helvetica are the official fonts of the University. ()*+,-./0123456789:;<=>?@A Helvetica Neue serves as an informative and HIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ[]^_`a readable display face. It is economical in terms of space and the bold weight can be read at great Helvetica Neue Bold Condensed distances. New Baskerville is used for the University ID and )*+,-./0123456789:;=?@AB IJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ[]^_`ab materials that require a more formal presentation. ! New Baskerville Roman )*+,-./0123456789:;=?@AB IJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ[]^_`ab ! New Baskerville Italic 14 GdAM Environmental Design + Wayfinding
  14. 14. COLOR When choosing colors, it is important to select ones that are easily identifiable. They are to appear on signage, which will correspond to the colors of the zones of the redesigned map. PMS 110 PMS 145 PMS 173 PMS 362 PMS 301 (0, 12, 100, 7) (0, 47, 100, 8) (0, 69, 100, 4) (70, 0, 100, 9) (100, 45, 0, 18) ICONS The purpose of the icons is to introduce a set of symbols to aid in campus wayfinding. They are meant to be Residential Academic Parking Emergency Wheelchair Cycling used in conjunction with phones accessible interactive and online services. Sciences Engineering Health Computer Business Criminal Art, media, Social sciences sciences administration justice + design sciences GdAM Environmental Design + Wayfinding 15
  15. 15. DEFINING CAMPUS ZONES Physical orientation is crucial to a user’s ability to understand and successfully navigate their environment. By creating a frame of reference, we are able to orient ourselves in a space and effectively move from one point to another. Dividing the campus into colored zones allows for better navigation through the campus as a whole. The proposed zones do not have an identity, they are simply an organizational tool where one can easily determine their location on a map by looking at their surroundings. Zone colors will be represented on kiosks, signage, and other wayfinding elements with the goal of being easily recognizable from any given point on campus. Zones are determined using two frames of reference: common paths + boundaries. 16 GdAM Environmental Design + Wayfinding
  16. 16. Paths as a frame of reference Boundaries as a frame of reference Huntington Avenue and Forsyth Street are Visual boundaries and physical boundaries The wall surrounding Ruggles Station is two of the most commonly traveled paths on were also used to determine campus zones. perhaps the most imposing barrier on campus. Therefore, these two paths are used The narrow pathways moving between campus. In only three locations can one pass as the initial dividing lines when deciding Snell Library and the Curry Student Center, through or over the wall. From both Columbus campus zones. along with the passage between Ell Hall Avenue and Northeastern University, the wall and Dodge Hall, do not provide visual seems to be a solid element dividing the connectivity. Therefore, one side of Curry campus. For this reason, it is considered a feels disconnected from the other, forming a defining zone line. boundary between the two zones. GdAM Environmental Design + Wayfinding 17
  17. 17. REDESIGNING THE MAP “There’s so much stuff on the map, and it’s organized by the initials of building names. I never know what they stand for.” A Northeastern student In the current map, the axonometric In our redesign, a grid enables users to The redrawn map is also oriented so that projection of the entire campus obstructs easily locate buildings, which are labeled Huntington is horizontal and visually the important views of pathways and distort with three letter abbreviations. Each zone represents the dividing line of campus. different areas of campus. The angled has a landmark building incorporated view point disorients the user and the literal in axonometric projection which is Northeastern is located in the heart of representation of the campus makes it architecturally distinctive and easily Boston, surrounded by many recognizable difficult to decipher which building is which, recognizable. This provides users with an landmarks. Users appreciated NU’s unique defeating the purpose of the illustrations. additional reference point. campus/city integration, so the map was expanded to include these cultural places of interest. 18 GdAM Environmental Design + Wayfinding
  18. 18. A B C D E F G H I J AAC KEN W es tla 1 Back Bay Fenw ay SMT nd BVD St MEL re et Christian KER CSH et Science Cente r re 2 Fenway CAH LOF St HEM y wa en m He P NRL STE 3 STW Museum of LGT FEN Fine Arts Symphony St Stephen Street outbound SPR STS HIL CTH Symphony inbound 4 WHT MAR 407 337 ROTC 319 Northeastern Museum of Fine Arts H u n t i n g t on Av e n u e University G a in RUB BUR WVH CAR STR KWL YMCA 5 et sbo CAB RIC DDG For syth Stre ro u et gh St Botolph Street P ARL re WVG MTH S t WVA-N KAR BRL ELL S tr e er DKS BLK Massachusetts 6 rk P GBG Avenue Pa CUL et WIL LAK HDN WVB MGR WVA-S FOR CHR P HTL HLM NGT HTG WVF CUR AAI LSC WVC ROB 7 n S t MSV DRC SEC SLB ts o P CNL Wa BEH SHL Ru gg le WVE EEC s St 8 P WVG Carter Playground re RYD et No rt ARC M as sa ha m SQU Cam P CBL P CBG pt on den 9 Ruggles Dou ch us et Da ven po DCB en ue St St g la bu s Av Ben ton St DCA C ol um Bu rke St s P P RNG COL Cov ent ry k Cun ard ts Av en rt St St Cyp rian 780 10 Me lne a COV St St ue Southwest Corridor REN Ca ss Blv s St re et INV Tre mo nt Pl 11 Boston Police Department d Academic Buildings AAC Asian-American Center - E1 AAI John D. O'Bryant COL Columbus Place CUL Cullinane Hall - F6 ARC Architecture Studio - D8 CAH Cahners Hall - D2 African-American Institute - B7 Alumni Center - F10 HTG Hurtig Hall - F7 BLK Blackman Auditorium - E6 CSH Cushing Hall - D2 BEH Behrakis Health REN Renaissance Park - C11 MGR Mugar Life Sciences Building - F6 BRL Barletta Natarorium - D6 CTH Catholic Center - G4 Sciences Center - B7 SQU Badger-Rosen MTH Matthews Arena - H6 CAB Cabot Physical Education Center - D5 FEN Fenway Center - F3 CAR Cargill Hall - C5 SquashBusters Center - F9 ROB Robinson Hall - F7 CHR Churchill Hall - D6 HIL Hillel-Frager - F4 DKS Dockser Hall - C6 YMCA YMCA - F5 CUR Curry Student Center - E7 MAR Marino Recreation Center - D4 HLM Holmes Hall - C7 DDG Dodge Hall - F5 ROTC ROTC Office - E4 KAR Kariotis Hall - C6 DRC Dana Research Center - D7 BVD Belvidere Place - J1 KWL Knowles Center - C5 EEC Egan Engineering/Science LAK Lake Hall - C6 Research Center - D8 MSV Meserve Hall - C7 ELL Ell Hall - E6 NGT Nightingale Hall - C7 FOR Forsyth Building - D6 RYD Ryder Hall - B8 HDN Hayden Hall - E6 SHL Shillman Hall - C7 LSC Latino/a Student Cultural Center - D7 RIC Richards Hall - E5 SEC Snell Engineering Center - D7 SLB Snell Library - E7 Residence Buildings Academic Residence Buildings Parking Garages and Lots 319 319 Huntington Ave. - F4 BUR Burstein Hall - B5 780 780 Columbus Ave. - E10 INV International Village - C11 ARL Arena Lot - G6 337 337 Huntington Ave. - E4 RUB Rubenstein Hall - A5 COV 10 Coventry Street - E10 WVF West Village F - B7 CBG Columbus Garage - F9 407 407 Huntington Ave. - C4 WIL Willis Hall - C6 DCA Davenport Commons A - G9 WVG West Village G - B6 CBL Columbus Lot - E9 HEM 142-148 Hemenway St. - E2 WVA-N West Village A North - B6 DCB Davenport Commons B - G9 WVH West Village H - B5 CNL Camden Lot - G7 KEN Kennedy Hall - E1 WVA-S West Village A South - A6 GBG Gainsboro Garage - G6 KER Kerr Hall - D2 WVB West Village B - B6 HTL Hurtig Lot - G6 LOF Loftman Hall and WVC West Village C - B7 NRL North Lot - E3 153 Hemenway St. - D2 WVE West Village E - B8 RNG Renaissance Garage - D10 LGT Light Hall - F3 WVG West Village Garage - B8 MEL Melvin Hall - D1 SMT Smith Hall - E1 SPR Speare Hall - E4 STE Stetson East - E3 STS Levine Hall and St. Stephen St. Complex - E4 STW Stetson West - D3 WHT White Hall - D4 GdAM Environmental Design + Wayfinding 19
  19. 19. Campus Map A B C D E F G H I J AAC W KEN es tla 1 SMT nd BVD St B ack B ay Fe n w a y re MEL et KER C hristian CSH et S cience C enter Fe nway re 2 St CAH LOF a y HEM w en H em P STE NRL 3 Museum of STW Fine A r ts LGT FEN Symphony St Stephen Stre et outbound SPR STS HIL CTH Symphony inbound 4 WHT MAR 407 337 ROTC 319 Northeastern Museum of Fine Arts H untington Avenue University Gai 5 RUB BUR WVH CAR STR KWL re et YMCA nsb CAB RIC DDG oro Fo rs yt h St ugh et St Bo to lp h St reet P re WVG MTH St KAR BRL ELL ARL Stre r WVA-N ke P 6 P ar DKS BLK CUL Massachusetts et HDN MGR GBG Avenue WIL LAK WVA-S WVB FOR HLM CHR P HTG HTL WVF NGT CUR LSC ROB 7 WVC AAI n S t MSV DRC SEC tso BEH SHL SLB P Wa CNL Ru gg WVE le EEC s 8 P St WVG Carter Playground re RYD et Nort ARC Massa SQU ham Cam P P pton 9 CBL CBG den Dou c h u s e tt D a ve n p Ruggles venu e DCB St St gla bus A Be nt on St DCA Colum B ur ke S s P COL Co ve nt ry P o rt S t k Cu na rd RNG s Aven St Cy pr ia 10 780 t M el ne a COV St St ue ns S outhwest C or r ido r INV REN C as s B S tr e e t T re m o n t Pl 11 B oston P olice lv d D epar tment 20 GdAM Environmental Design + Wayfinding
  20. 20. Campus Map Key Academic Buildings AAC Asian-American Center - E1 AAI John D. O'Bryant COL Columbus Place CUL Cullinane Hall - F6 ARC Architecture Studio - D8 CAH Cahners Hall - D2 African-American Institute - B7 Alumni Center - F10 HTG Hurtig Hall - F7 BLK Blackman Auditorium - E6 CSH Cushing Hall - D2 BEH Behrakis Health REN Renaissance Park - C11 MGR Mugar Life Sciences Building - F6 BRL Barletta Natarorium - D6 CTH Catholic Center - G4 Sciences Center - B7 SQU Badger-Rosen MTH Matthews Arena - H6 CAB Cabot Physical Education Center - D5 FEN Fenway Center - F3 CAR Cargill Hall - C5 SquashBusters Center - F9 ROB Robinson Hall - F7 CHR Churchill Hall - D7 HIL Hillel-Frager - F4 DKS Dockser Hall - C6 YMCA YMCA - F5 CUR Curry Student Center - E7 MAR Marino Recreation Center - D4 HLM Holmes Hall - C7 DDG Dodge Hall - F5 ROTC ROTC Office - E4 KAR Kariotis Hall - C6 DRC Dana Research Center - D7 BVD Belvidere Place - J1 KWL Knowles Center - C5 EEC Egan Engineering/Science LAK Lake Hall - C6 Research Center - D8 MSV Meserve Hall - C7 ELL Ell Hall - E6 NGT Nightingale Hall - C7 FOR Forsyth Building - D6 RYD Ryder Hall - B8 HDN Hayden Hall - E6 SHL Shillman Hall - C7 LSC Latino/a Student Cultural Center - D7 RIC Richards Hall - E5 SEC Snell Engineering Center - D7 SLB Snell Library - E7 Residence Buildings Academic Residence Buildings Parking Lots and Garages 319 319 Huntington Ave. - F4 BUR Burstein Hall - B5 780 780 Columbus Ave. - E10 INV International Village - C11 ARL Arena Lot - G6 337 337 Huntington Ave. - E4 RUB Rubenstein Hall - A5 COV 10 Coventry Street - E10 WVF West Village F - B7 CBG Columbus Garage - F9 407 407 Huntington Ave. - C4 WIL Willis Hall - C6 DCA Davenport Commons A - G9 WVG West Village G - B6 CBL Columbus Lot - E9 HEM 142-148 Hemenway St. - E2 WVA-N West Village A North - B6 DCB Davenport Commons B - G9 WVH West Village H - B5 CNL Camden Lot - G7 KEN Kennedy Hall - E1 WVA-S West Village A South - A6 GBG Gainsboro Garage - G6 KER Kerr Hall - D2 WVB West Village B - B6 HTL Hurtig Lot - G7 LOF Loftman Hall and WVC West Village C - B7 NRL North Lot - E3 153 Hemenway St. - D2 WVE West Village E - B8 RNG Renaissance Garage - D10 LGT Light Hall - F3 WVG West Village Garage - B8 MEL Melvin Hall - D1 SMT Smith Hall - E1 SPR Speare Hall - E4 STE Stetson East - E3 STS Levine Hall and St. Stephen St. Complex - E4 STW Stetson West - D3 WHT White Hall - D4 GdAM Environmental Design + Wayfinding 21
  21. 21. SIGNS “It’s basically impossible to tell someone how to get from Forsyth Street to the library.” A tour guide on giving directions The new system will supplement the existing that signage not obstruct current pathways, system in place on campus. It consists of stating that “probably small and subtle would directional signage, displaying a combination be best in our urban setting.” of localized maps, campus maps, directional words and arrows, and interactive features. Interactive and digital signage is placed in prominent social spaces on campus, while The design and location of the signage smaller, less prominent signs are placed were informed by intensive study of the along highly trafficked routes on campus. Northeastern campus and those who interact with it. Frequent users found it integral 22 GdAM Environmental Design + Wayfinding

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