ALISS and Quality Assurance: for NHSInform

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This is a presentation (at the Beardmore Hospital - hence the ref to shaving - sorry, couldn't resist a wee pun) to a Quality Assurance Governance group within NHS Inform. I was making the point that ALISS does support QA - only "not as we know it, Jim" :-)

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  • This strange looking beast was once a lion, gifted to the King of Sweden in 1731, and when it died, the skin and bones were given to a local taxidermist. But like most people in 18th century Sweden, he’d never seen a lion. So he did his best, and this is the result. And that’s our problem here, that we’re presenting something which is innovative and not been done before. Our vision is that it will lead to huge improvement in participation, and promoting localism, using emerging technologies to tackle our changing demography. We’re describing the ALISS Engine, but we don’t know what it looks like – it will link data but you won’t see it.
  • We know from public feedback that managing alone without proper information or support is a difficult struggle. This picture shows how little time is spent with health professionals. A person with, for instance diabetes, or asthma or epilepsy will see a health professional for about 15 – 20 minutes per month, and actually - this would be pretty generous in some surgeries. This adds up to just 3 hours per year of professional contact.
  • The ALISS engine collects short descriptions and links to useful resources, either by people submitting things, or by getting them electronically from other systems in various ways. Once a resource is in the ALISS index, people with accounts can add keywords or more information, like sticking a post-it note on. We call that curation, meaning collecting information and labelling it in ways that make it more useful and easier to find. This means devolving control over content, which is not only in line with the ethic of self management but also more sustainable as it means no resources going to centralised administration. But, it’s not a free-for-all. All content is moderated, and you can filter it so you only get information from sources you trust. ALISS data can be published and searched by any other computer systems- the data is open and accessible across the web. The project team has created some simple apps to show the potential for this. See http:// demo.aliss.org /
  • This means useful resources which might be scattered across lots of different systems, or not online at all, can now be indexed in one place which we call the ALISS Engine. Sources might be an existing Directory; a health/care practitioner on or after a course on Self Management; a group of school pupils; a member of a (Macmillan) patient group in a library; an asset-mapping process, just to name a few. The Engine can then be accessed by any system across the web. So it can feed other web sites, practice systems, libraries, advice centres, right across Scotland.
  • During the day, a service user recited by heart, some of Mary Oliver’s poem. It was very important for her sense of well-being. You could have heard a pin drop while the verses were being recited.
  • …and we were able to find a YouTube clip of the author reading her own work. So people not at the event could maybe find it useful, as well as those who were.
  • The ALISS engine collects short descriptions and links to useful resources, either by people submitting things, or by getting them electronically from other systems in various ways. Once a resource is in the ALISS index, people with accounts can add keywords or more information, like sticking a post-it note on. We call that curation, meaning collecting information and labelling it in ways that make it more useful and easier to find. This means devolving control over content, which is not only in line with the ethic of self management but also more sustainable as it means no resources going to centralised administration. But, it’s not a free-for-all. All content is moderated, and you can filter it so you only get information from sources you trust. ALISS data can be published and searched by any other computer systems- the data is open and accessible across the web. The project team has created some simple apps to show the potential for this. See http:// demo.aliss.org /
  • Here is an individual resource (a ‘curation’) from the Kirkintilloch list. The title is a link – to the original source. The text description has been copy and pasted from the original – but it could be the curator’s own summary. The material here is all indexed, to hep with findability Immediately below the text description, note the ‘tags’ or ‘key words’. When you curate an item, ALISS offers tags depending upon what you type in, but it’s not mandatory – you can create your own. In the box on the lower left, note the ‘owner’ who first input this curation. You can see what else the owner has curated too. The curation is date/time-stamped, together with the most recent edit (if any) And at the foot of the item, there is an opportunity to ‘report’ this resource – more on this later.
  • Here is the original source of the Food co-op curation. For now, just to note the mention of ‘volunteers’ at the foot of this screenshot, at the left.
  • So let’s say I spotted the opportunity for volunteering, while the original curator didn’t. Let’s also say that users of my information service are interested in that sort of thing. So here I can add my own tag and a bit of text – without disturbing the original curation.
  • And – if you have a look at the box at the lower left - my addition now shows up alongside the original curation. It’s been indexed together, re the item, so it can be found by people interested in volunteering, as well as food, etc. So its findability is improved. And the original curator hasn’t had to try to second-guess every possible perspective or search angle on this item.
  • If I clicked the link on the earlier page, I’m given this form to complete. I can categorise the alert generally, and then add a text description. What happens next? The item concerned is set aside from any searches of the ALISS Engine, until the matter is resolved. An alert is given to the original owner, and to any other account-holders who have added further curations to the item, and to the ALISS HQ team, that the item has been the subject of a report. We don’t currently (summer 2012) have a fixed set of actions that follow this – we want to work these out with curation communities, and know that one size won’t fit all. But ultimately, the item concerned won’t figure in any ALISS searches until the message goes back that the issue has been resolved. ALISS HQ can zap an item, if all else fails though – but we’d rather not have to do that.
  • ALISS and Quality Assurance: for NHSInform

    1. 1.  ALISS enjoys a shave Access to Local Information to Support Self-Management Working towards better access to information to support self management of long term conditions. A collaboration of the Scottish Government, NHS Scotland, and the Long Term Conditions Alliance Scotland…and ever so many other organisations…and people…Making Self-Management Support more findable
    2. 2.  What is ALISS?? It’s ‘infrastructure’ • Technology – the ALISS Engine • ‘Social Processes’ – service-design & work with learning communities(!)Making Self-Management Support more findable
    3. 3. Making Self-Management Support more findable
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    5. 5.  15 min per month = 3 hours per yearMaking Self-Management Support more findable Copyright 2004 FreePhotosBank.com
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    16. 16.  The importance of conversationsMaking Self-Management Support more findable
    17. 17.  In the ALISS engine, the 3 key information- service tasks are devolved collect itALISS engine it ALISS sortengine it publishMaking Self-Management Support more findable
    18. 18.  So a wide variety of info can be …managed contributed to the ALISS engine ALISS engine (curated) info flows Engine, out to and… intermediary information services CentreMaking Self-Management Support more findable
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    21. 21.  Discovering local resourcesMaking Self-Management Support more findable
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    35. 35.  How QA works in the ALISS Engine collect itALISS engine it ALISS sortengine it publishMaking Self-Management Support more findable
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