   Air is the invisible, tasteless, and    I.  odorless mixture of gases that  surrounds us. The mass of air that surrou...
 Without  an  adequate amount  of clean air, both  would die. Air pollution is  the presence of  materials in the air  t...
 Much of the air pollution is a result of human  activity , however, some results from natural  events, such as volcanic ...
› A. Ambient air –  Ambient air is the air or  atmosphere outside.› This is the air that is most  important in air quality...
› B. Inside air – This category, as  the name suggests, includes the air  found inside buildings.› The quality of air foun...
 II.The air contains a  relatively consistent mix of  gases in all places. Some variation of this mix  may be found base...
 As  elevation increases, the air  decreases in density or becomes ―  thinner.‖ About 95% of the total air mass is  with...
› A. Nitrogen (N)—78%› B. Oxygen (O)—21%› C. Carbon Dioxide (CO2) —.03%
› D. Argon—less than 1 %› E. Other gases including hydrogen, helium, and neon—less than 1 %
 Much of the air pollution is a result of  human activity , however, some results  from natural events, such as volcanic ...
 I. Once the air becomes polluted, it is  often very difficult to remove the  sometimes dangerous materials from  the air...
 A. Gases- Gas pollutants are difficult to  identify because, like gases normally  found in air, pollutants that are gase...
 1. Carbon Forms- The most common  carbon gases in the air are  hydrocarbon, carbon monoxide  (CO), and carbon dioxide (C...
 a. Hydrocarbons are classified as  volatile organic compounds (VOC). A volatile organic compound is any  compound conta...
 Photochemical reactions are reactions  that are initiated by the sun. A common form of this reaction is  photochemical ...
 b. The use of engines that use  gasoline or other fuels take oxygen  from the air and release carbon  gases into it. On...
 2. Sulfur oxides-Sulfur that is found in the  air is most often found in its oxide form. Common sulfur oxides that are ...
 a. Sulfur dioxide is produced when fuels  containing sulfur are burned in the  presence of oxygen. Common fuels that co...
 b. Sulfur trioxide is able to combine with  water vapor to form sulfuric acid  (H2SO4). This is very strong acid that c...
 3.  Nitrogen oxides- nitrogen oxides  are formed during combustions  when nitrogen in fuel combines with  oxygen. Commo...
 4. Photochemical oxidants are  formed by the interaction of nitric  acid, sunlight, and hydrocarbons. These materials a...
 B. Particulate Matter- particulate  includes small particles similar to dust  and droplets of liquid. Smoke from factor...
 II.    Air pollution can  have devastating  effects on the quality  of life for humans and  other organisms alike.
 A. Human health  problems- A variety of  human health problems  are related to air  pollution. Most are respiratory  di...
 Lung    Cancer Emphysema Bronchitis Blacklung diseases
 These  diseases, as well as others, can  occur when pollutants are inhaled. When in the lungs, the pollutants  interfer...
 Alveoli are air-containing cells found in  the lungs. It is the thin membranes between the  alveoli and blood vessels w...
 Nostrils - They have small hairs  and moist membranes that  filter dust and some gases. Materials that get past the  sm...
 Other animals- pollution may injure  farm animals, pets, wildlife, and other  animals in ways similar to that of  humans...
 Plants  and other organisms - Air pollution may cause damage to fruits, vegetables, flowers, trees, lawn grasses, and ot...
 I. An air quality standard is the  maximum level of atmospheric pollution  allowed at one time in a geographical  area....
 A. The standards found within the  NAAQS are grouped into two sets. These are called primary and secondary  standards. ...
 II. Most forms of air pollution are not  visible to the human eye. Therefore, special equipment is needed  to detect th...
 Samples   of ambient air are  sometimes collected with an air  pollution sampling pump. This pump collects and measures...
The  solution is then chemically analyzed to detect any pollutant that is present.Different solutions are needed to test...
 B. Point source air pollution is a specific  place where air pollution originates. Point sources are identifiable and  ...
 An emission is gas-borne  pollutant that is released into  the air. Monitoring point source air  pollution involves usi...
   III. Air pollutants can be measured in    three different ways. They are:    › A. Volume per volume - Volume per volum...
 B.   Weight per volume-  Weight per volume  measurement is the weight  of pollutant in a cubic  meter. It is used to me...
 C. Dimension measurement- Dimensions  are used to measure solid particles in the  air. These small particles are known ...
 III.As discussed earlier in this lesson,  air pollution can cause severe  damage to living organisms. Although we can n...
 A. Controlling emissions - There are  several ways that people can work to  reduce the amount of emissions placed  in th...
 B. Reusing and Recycling - By  reusing an recycling products, the  pollutants that would have been  released in the manu...
 C.   Practicing Safety - By following  basic safety guidelines with handling  products, fewer accidents will occur. Thi...
Air
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Air
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discusses atmosphere composition and air pollution

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Air

  1. 1.  Air is the invisible, tasteless, and I. odorless mixture of gases that surrounds us. The mass of air that surrounds the earth forms the atmosphere. The availability of quality air is critical to both plants and animals.
  2. 2.  Without an adequate amount of clean air, both would die. Air pollution is the presence of materials in the air that damage air quality.
  3. 3.  Much of the air pollution is a result of human activity , however, some results from natural events, such as volcanic action or the decay of organic materials. An air pollutant is any material that causes air pollution. Air can be divided into two basic categories.
  4. 4. › A. Ambient air – Ambient air is the air or atmosphere outside.› This is the air that is most important in air quality.› The quality of ambient air is affected by the materials released into it from various sources.
  5. 5. › B. Inside air – This category, as the name suggests, includes the air found inside buildings.› The quality of air found inside of buildings is of great importance as well since most people spend a larger portion of their day breathing inside air than ambient air.
  6. 6.  II.The air contains a relatively consistent mix of gases in all places. Some variation of this mix may be found based on the local environment. The greatest concentration of gases is near the surface of the earth.
  7. 7.  As elevation increases, the air decreases in density or becomes ― thinner.‖ About 95% of the total air mass is within 12 miles of the earth. Some of the major gases found in air are:
  8. 8. › A. Nitrogen (N)—78%› B. Oxygen (O)—21%› C. Carbon Dioxide (CO2) —.03%
  9. 9. › D. Argon—less than 1 %› E. Other gases including hydrogen, helium, and neon—less than 1 %
  10. 10.  Much of the air pollution is a result of human activity , however, some results from natural events, such as volcanic action or the decay of organic materials. An air pollutant is any material that causes air pollution.
  11. 11.  I. Once the air becomes polluted, it is often very difficult to remove the sometimes dangerous materials from the air. There are two major types of air pollutants. They are gases and particulate matter.
  12. 12.  A. Gases- Gas pollutants are difficult to identify because, like gases normally found in air, pollutants that are gases are colorless and odorless. Also, gases remain in the atmosphere for years. Unlike other types of pollutants, gases do not settle out of the air. There are several classifications of gas pollutants. Some of the major ones are:
  13. 13.  1. Carbon Forms- The most common carbon gases in the air are hydrocarbon, carbon monoxide (CO), and carbon dioxide (CO2). These pollutants are released through the process of combustion or burning of materials that contain carbon and the petroleum industry.
  14. 14.  a. Hydrocarbons are classified as volatile organic compounds (VOC). A volatile organic compound is any compound containing carbon that participates in photochemical reactions in the atmosphere.
  15. 15.  Photochemical reactions are reactions that are initiated by the sun. A common form of this reaction is photochemical smog. Smog is a mixture of carbon dioxide and sulfur dioxide.
  16. 16.  b. The use of engines that use gasoline or other fuels take oxygen from the air and release carbon gases into it. One poisonous gas produced in this process is carbon monoxide. This gas damages the ability of the human blood to carry oxygen. It is critically important that when operating an engine it is done in a well-ventilated area.
  17. 17.  2. Sulfur oxides-Sulfur that is found in the air is most often found in its oxide form. Common sulfur oxides that are found in the air include sulfur dioxide(SO2) and sulfur trioxide(SO3). When the amount of sulfur reaches a certain level it can be detected by the presents of a “rotten egg –type” odor. Higher levels of sulfur can cause lung damage.
  18. 18.  a. Sulfur dioxide is produced when fuels containing sulfur are burned in the presence of oxygen. Common fuels that contain sulfur are coal and oil.
  19. 19.  b. Sulfur trioxide is able to combine with water vapor to form sulfuric acid (H2SO4). This is very strong acid that can quickly react with materials when contract is made. Rain containing sulfuric acid is known as acid rain. Acid rain can cause damage to plants and property.
  20. 20.  3. Nitrogen oxides- nitrogen oxides are formed during combustions when nitrogen in fuel combines with oxygen. Common forms of nitrogen oxides are nitrogen monoxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide ( NO2). The effects of nitrogen oxides are similar to those of of sulfur oxides.
  21. 21.  4. Photochemical oxidants are formed by the interaction of nitric acid, sunlight, and hydrocarbons. These materials are the primary ingredients in smog. A major produce to the reaction is ozone (O3). Ozone provides a protective shield around the earth, but also can cause problems for living organisms.
  22. 22.  B. Particulate Matter- particulate includes small particles similar to dust and droplets of liquid. Smoke from factories, burning trash, and forest fires, as well as dust from roads and mines, are sources of solid particles.
  23. 23.  II. Air pollution can have devastating effects on the quality of life for humans and other organisms alike.
  24. 24.  A. Human health problems- A variety of human health problems are related to air pollution. Most are respiratory diseases. Some of the more common diseases that can be related to air pollution include:
  25. 25.  Lung Cancer Emphysema Bronchitis Blacklung diseases
  26. 26.  These diseases, as well as others, can occur when pollutants are inhaled. When in the lungs, the pollutants interfere with with the exchange of gases. The area inside of the lungs where the gases are exchanged is large and contains may tiny alveoli.
  27. 27.  Alveoli are air-containing cells found in the lungs. It is the thin membranes between the alveoli and blood vessels where gas exchange occurs. Some pollutants increase the liquid in the lungs and impair the exchange of gases. The human body does have a few natural defense against air pollutants. The first point where air is cleansed before reaching the lungs is the nostrils.
  28. 28.  Nostrils - They have small hairs and moist membranes that filter dust and some gases. Materials that get past the small hairs may be absorbed by the mucous membranes. They become trapped and are then either blown or swallowed.
  29. 29.  Other animals- pollution may injure farm animals, pets, wildlife, and other animals in ways similar to that of humans. Additionally, animals that have feed produced in areas near high air pollution may be poisoned by what they eat. Acid rain can also destroy wild fish population in lakes and streams if in a strong enough concentration.
  30. 30.  Plants and other organisms - Air pollution may cause damage to fruits, vegetables, flowers, trees, lawn grasses, and other plants. Several pollutants can destroy leaf tissue in plants. This results in the plant not being able to manufacture the needed chlorophyll.
  31. 31.  I. An air quality standard is the maximum level of atmospheric pollution allowed at one time in a geographical area. These standards, which are called the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS), are set by the Environmental Protection Agency. These are designed to set limits on the amount of pollution allowed in the air and to force those who pollute the air to stop.
  32. 32.  A. The standards found within the NAAQS are grouped into two sets. These are called primary and secondary standards. › 1. Primary standards deal with safe limits of pollution from the standpoint of human health. › 2. Air pollution standards that deal with limits on non-health effects, such as damage to crops, property, and wildlife are called secondary standards.
  33. 33.  II. Most forms of air pollution are not visible to the human eye. Therefore, special equipment is needed to detect the presence of pollutants in the air. In addition to proper equipment, technicians must receive special training in order to operate the equipment and evaluate the results correctly.
  34. 34.  Samples of ambient air are sometimes collected with an air pollution sampling pump. This pump collects and measures the quantity of air being sampled. The sample is passed into special absorbing solution.
  35. 35. The solution is then chemically analyzed to detect any pollutant that is present.Different solutions are needed to test for various pollutants.
  36. 36.  B. Point source air pollution is a specific place where air pollution originates. Point sources are identifiable and discrete (separate and distinct). These sites produce emissions that are usually required to be monitored to measure the amount of pollutants released.
  37. 37.  An emission is gas-borne pollutant that is released into the air. Monitoring point source air pollution involves using complex sampling techniques to get information. The EPA sets specific methods that must be followed to monitor point air pollution.
  38. 38.  III. Air pollutants can be measured in three different ways. They are: › A. Volume per volume - Volume per volume measurement is the number of parts of a pollutant in the air. › Often parts are expressed as parts per million or ppm.
  39. 39.  B. Weight per volume- Weight per volume measurement is the weight of pollutant in a cubic meter. It is used to measure the concentration of a pollutant in the air and is stated as micrograms per cubic meter (ug/m3).
  40. 40.  C. Dimension measurement- Dimensions are used to measure solid particles in the air. These small particles are known as particulate. These particles are measured in microns or micrometers (um), or one-millionth of a meter. Fine particulate of less than 2.5 um is more dangerous to human health than larger particulate.
  41. 41.  III.As discussed earlier in this lesson, air pollution can cause severe damage to living organisms. Although we can never completely eliminate air pollution, there are several things that people can do to reduce the amount of pollution found in the atmosphere.
  42. 42.  A. Controlling emissions - There are several ways that people can work to reduce the amount of emissions placed in the air supply. Scrubbers can be used on factory stacks to remove gases and particulate. People could use fuels that produce less sulfur. Also by maintaining engines in good working order, less fuel is burned and fewer pollutants are place in the environment.
  43. 43.  B. Reusing and Recycling - By reusing an recycling products, the pollutants that would have been released in the manufacturing of new products is avoided. Recycling a product requires more activity than reusing a product. However, the recycling process does not create as much pollution as initial manufacturing.
  44. 44.  C. Practicing Safety - By following basic safety guidelines with handling products, fewer accidents will occur. This can reduce the amount of pollutants that are released into the air. Also, when working in areas of high air pollution , people should wear proper safety equipment to avoid health related problems.

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