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Effectively Blending Society, Economics, and the Environment
2015 Parks and Greenspace Conference
March 23th, 2015
MODERAT...
Park Pride Creating High Performance Public Spaces March 23, 2015
Connie Chung
HR&A Advisors
HR&A is a real estate and economic development
consulting firm working at the intersection of the public
and private secto...
4
HR&A Advisors: Real estate and economic development
consultants with expertise in the economics of open space.
Planning
...
5
The Lawn on D is a 2.7-acre temporary outdoor space at the Boston
Convention & Exhibition Center (BCEC) in a burgeoning ...
6
Why The Lawn on D?
The Lawn on D will be an experimental
public space.
It will foster creativity and test
opportunities ...
7
Phased operations funding stream
Time
RevenueScale
Rental Revenue
Sponsorship
Food & Beverage
Revenue
Transition to
Perm...
8
FOOD &
DRINK
PLAYSCAPE
S
EVENTS
DESTINATIO
N ART &
DESIGN
PASSIVE
PARK
High Performance relies on the Five Building Bloc...
PASSIVE PARK
Courtesy MCCA
DESTINATION ART & DESIGN
Courtesy Howeler +
Yoon
EVENTS
Courtesy Boston Globe
PLAYSCAPES
Courtesy MCCA
FOOD & DRINK
Courtesy MCCA
14
Why can’t a park jump-start a neighborhood?
David Barth, AICP, PLA, CPRP
dbarthla@gmail.com
The Adoption of Innovation in the Planning and Design
Process; Creating High Performance Public Spaces
What are the key fa...
The Adoption of Innovation in the Planning and Design
Process; Creating High Performance Public Spaces
• Why, while there ...
The Adoption of Innovation in the Planning and Design
Process; Creating High Performance Public Spaces
• Why, while there ...
PREMISE
Desire for more
livable, sustainable,
and resilient
communities
Create an
interconnected
Public Realm
Design and
manage ea...
An Integrated Public Realm
Definition of the Public Realm
A community’s publicly accessible
system of streets, sidewalks, parks,
civic spaces, histor...
Definition of the Public Realm
“Our common property…the
fundamental element in any
community – the framework around
which ...
High Performance Public Space© (HPPS)
Any publicly accessible space
that generates economic,
environmental, and social
sus...
METHODOLOGY
Mixed Methods Case Study Design
Phase I: Criteria for HPPSs
• A Delphi Method to develop and refine criteria to be used to...
Phase I: Criteria for HPPSs – Delphi ProcessSocial
• Improves the
neighborhood
• Improves social and
physical mobility
• E...
Phase II: Selection of Cases for Study
Solicitation of Cases:
• Florida City County
Managers Association:
550 Members
• Fl...
City of Tallahassee Gaines Street
City of Lakeland Lake Mirror Park
www.metrojacksonville.com
City of Clearwater Beachwalk...
FINDINGS AND CONCLUSIONS
Factors that May Influence the Adoption of Innovation in
the Planning and Design of Public Spaces –
Diffusion of Innovatio...
Hypothesis
Primary factors:
 Presence of a strong
leader/advocate
 Perception of the innovation
 Collaborative relation...
Hypothesis
Primary factors:
 Presence of a strong
leader/advocate
 Perception of the innovation
 Collaborative relation...
Implications for the Adoption of Innovation in the
Planning and Design Process for Public Spaces
City of Kissimmee Lakefront Park
Population 64,000
System Openness, Engaged Public
Perception of the Innovation
Long Range Vision Plan
Glatting Jackson/ AECOM
Collaborative Relationships (+ Good Food)
• Elected Officials
• City Staff and Administration
• Community Redevelopment
Ag...
Strong Leadership, Advocacy
Mayor Jim Swan,City Manager Mike Steigerwald
Parks, Recreation, and Public Facilities Director...
Benefits To-Date
• Estimated 500,000 visitors annually
• Improved lake habitat, storm water
treatment
• Increased downtown...
SUMMARY
Civic Spaces Should be Planned and
Designed as Elements of the Public Realm
Public Realm Subsystems Should be
Planned Concurrently
• Parks and Civic Spaces
• Transportation
• Public Facilities
• Sto...
Every Civic Space Should be Designed and
Managed as a High Performance Public Space
Social
• Improve the neighborhood
• Im...
Civic Spaces Should Focus on Experiences,
Not Just Facilities
• Places to play vs.
playground
• Places to relax vs. benche...
Communities Should Conduct a Self-Audit
Before Initiating a New Project
Project Pre-Planning Checklist
Primary Factors:
 ...
Erica Madsen, PE, LEED AP BD+C
Foresite Group
Park Pride Creating High Performance Public Spaces March 23, 2015
Park Pride Creating High Performance Public Spaces March 23, 2015
Park Pride Creating High Performance Public Spaces March 23, 2015
Park Pride Creating High Performance Public Spaces March 23, 2015
Park Pride Creating High Performance Public Spaces March 23, 2015
Park Pride Creating High Performance Public Spaces March 23, 2015
Park Pride Creating High Performance Public Spaces March 23, 2015
Park Pride Creating High Performance Public Spaces March 23, 2015
QUESTIONS?
Creating High-Performance Public Spaces: Effectively Blending Society, Economics and the Environment
Creating High-Performance Public Spaces: Effectively Blending Society, Economics and the Environment
Creating High-Performance Public Spaces: Effectively Blending Society, Economics and the Environment
Creating High-Performance Public Spaces: Effectively Blending Society, Economics and the Environment
Creating High-Performance Public Spaces: Effectively Blending Society, Economics and the Environment
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Creating High-Performance Public Spaces: Effectively Blending Society, Economics and the Environment

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Presentation from Park Pride's 2015 Parks and Greenspace Conference. The presenters are David Barth, Connie Chung, and Erica Madsen.

A High-Performance Public Space© (HPPS) is defined as a publicly accessible space that generates economic, environmental, and social sustainability benefits for the local community. An HPPS can be a park, trail, square, green, natural area, plaza or any other element of the 'public realm' that generates all three types of benefits. This panel discussion will focus on the unique qualities that lead to the creation of HPPSs, the factors that influence their planning and design, and case studies from Florida, Atlanta, and Boston.

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Creating High-Performance Public Spaces: Effectively Blending Society, Economics and the Environment

  1. 1. Effectively Blending Society, Economics, and the Environment 2015 Parks and Greenspace Conference March 23th, 2015 MODERATOR Candace Damon, HR&A Advisors SPEAKERS David Barth, Barth Associates Connie Chung, HR&A Advisors Erica Madsen, Foresite Group
  2. 2. Park Pride Creating High Performance Public Spaces March 23, 2015 Connie Chung HR&A Advisors
  3. 3. HR&A is a real estate and economic development consulting firm working at the intersection of the public and private sector. Our work transforms communities and revitalizes urban environments. HR&A Advisors, Inc.
  4. 4. 4 HR&A Advisors: Real estate and economic development consultants with expertise in the economics of open space. Planning Design & Construction Phased Implementation Complete Twin Cities Green Line Fort Mason Center Oklahoma City Seattle Waterfront Mnpls. Peavey Plaza Memphis Shelby Farms Waterfront Toronto NYC The High Line Brooklyn Bridge Park Cincinnati Fountain Sq. Boston RK G’way NYC Battery Park
  5. 5. 5 The Lawn on D is a 2.7-acre temporary outdoor space at the Boston Convention & Exhibition Center (BCEC) in a burgeoning neighborhood. Sources: MCCA
  6. 6. 6 Why The Lawn on D? The Lawn on D will be an experimental public space. It will foster creativity and test opportunities for integrating BCEC into the urban fabric with programming, events, and retail, paving the road to a financially sustainable permanent public space.
  7. 7. 7 Phased operations funding stream Time RevenueScale Rental Revenue Sponsorship Food & Beverage Revenue Transition to Permanent Event Space MCCA Investment
  8. 8. 8 FOOD & DRINK PLAYSCAPE S EVENTS DESTINATIO N ART & DESIGN PASSIVE PARK High Performance relies on the Five Building Blocks of Programming
  9. 9. PASSIVE PARK Courtesy MCCA
  10. 10. DESTINATION ART & DESIGN Courtesy Howeler + Yoon
  11. 11. EVENTS Courtesy Boston Globe
  12. 12. PLAYSCAPES Courtesy MCCA
  13. 13. FOOD & DRINK Courtesy MCCA
  14. 14. 14 Why can’t a park jump-start a neighborhood?
  15. 15. David Barth, AICP, PLA, CPRP dbarthla@gmail.com
  16. 16. The Adoption of Innovation in the Planning and Design Process; Creating High Performance Public Spaces What are the key factors that influence the adoption of sustainable design innovations in the planning and design of high performance public spaces?
  17. 17. The Adoption of Innovation in the Planning and Design Process; Creating High Performance Public Spaces • Why, while there is general acknowledgement of the potential to generate sustainability benefits through the public realm, do so many parks and public spaces still fail to do so? • Why do some public space planning and design teams (public and private) adopt sustainable design innovations while others don’t?
  18. 18. The Adoption of Innovation in the Planning and Design Process; Creating High Performance Public Spaces • Why, while there is general acknowledgement of the potential to generate sustainability benefits through the public realm, do so many parks and public spaces still fail to do so? • Why do some public space planning and design teams (public and private) adopt sustainable design innovations while others don’t? • What are the key factors that influence the adoption of sustainable design innovations in the planning and design of high performance public spaces?
  19. 19. PREMISE
  20. 20. Desire for more livable, sustainable, and resilient communities Create an interconnected Public Realm Design and manage each element of the public realm as a High Performance Public Space (HPPS) © HPPSs generate multiple economic, social, and environmental benefits An interconnected system of HPPSs can contribute to a more livable, sustainable, and resilient community
  21. 21. An Integrated Public Realm
  22. 22. Definition of the Public Realm A community’s publicly accessible system of streets, sidewalks, parks, civic spaces, historic and cultural areas, natural areas, trails, stormwater treatment ponds, utility corridors and/or other lands owned and managed by city, county, regional, state or federal agencies (Barth, 2014).
  23. 23. Definition of the Public Realm “Our common property…the fundamental element in any community – the framework around which everything grows” (Garvin, 2013).
  24. 24. High Performance Public Space© (HPPS) Any publicly accessible space that generates economic, environmental, and social sustainability benefits for their local community. A HPPS can be a park, trail, square, green, natural area, plaza or any other element of the ‘public realm’ that generates all three types of benefits (Barth, 2015). Citygarden, St. Louis
  25. 25. METHODOLOGY
  26. 26. Mixed Methods Case Study Design Phase I: Criteria for HPPSs • A Delphi Method to develop and refine criteria to be used to identify case studies of High Performance Public Spaces. Phase II: Selection of Cases for Study • Solicitation of City/County Managers and Parks Directors to nominate cases based on the adopted criteria. • Field studies to validate, score and select cases. Phase III: Evaluation of Cases • Background interviews, review and evaluation of public case files. • Statistical analysis of a survey instrument administered to members of the planning and design teams involved in the planning, design and construction of the cases. • Structured interviews with the planning and design team members to further explore the variables that contributed to the HPPSs.
  27. 27. Phase I: Criteria for HPPSs – Delphi ProcessSocial • Improves the neighborhood • Improves social and physical mobility • Encourages health and fitness • Provides relief from urban congestion, stressors • Provides places for formal and informal social gathering, art, performances, events • Provides opportunities for individual, group, passive and active recreation • Facilitates shared experiences among different groups • Attracts diverse populations • Promotes creative and constructive social interaction Environmental • Uses energy, water, and resources efficiently • Improves water quality of both surface and ground water • Serves as a net carbon sink • Enhances, preserves, promotes, or contributes to biological diversity • Hardscape materials selected for longevity of service, social/ cultural/ historical sustainability, regional availability, low carbon footprint • Provides opportunities to enhance environmental awareness and knowledge • Serves as an interconnected node within larger scale ecological corridors and natural habitat Economic • Creates and facilitates revenue-generating opportunities for the public and/or the private sectors • Creates meaningful and desirable employment • Indirectly creates or sustains good, living wage jobs • Sustains or increases property values • Catalyzes infill development and/or the re-use of obsolete or under-used buildings or spaces • Attracts new residents • Attracts new businesses • Generates increased business and tax revenues • Optimizes operations and maintenance costs
  28. 28. Phase II: Selection of Cases for Study Solicitation of Cases: • Florida City County Managers Association: 550 Members • Florida Recreation and Parks Association: 212 Members • Goal: 3 cases
  29. 29. City of Tallahassee Gaines Street City of Lakeland Lake Mirror Park www.metrojacksonville.com City of Clearwater Beachwalk www.clearwaterdreaming APA top ten public spaces in America, 2014
  30. 30. FINDINGS AND CONCLUSIONS
  31. 31. Factors that May Influence the Adoption of Innovation in the Planning and Design of Public Spaces – Diffusion of Innovations Theory (1962) • Based on the 1957 Iowa State doctoral research of Everett Rogers • Innovation is a universal, five-step process • Certain factors are more influential in the adoption of innovations than others. • “No other field of behavior science research represents more effort by more scholars in more disciplines in more nations”
  32. 32. Hypothesis Primary factors:  Presence of a strong leader/advocate  Perception of the innovation  Collaborative relationship of the planning and design team  Internal characteristics of the organization  External characteristics of the organization, such as system openness and an engaged public Secondary factors:  Perceived competition from neighboring communities  Costs, economic benefits, and perceived return-on-investment  Presence of a long-range vision plan, including sustainability goals and indicators  A liberal/Democratic population
  33. 33. Hypothesis Primary factors:  Presence of a strong leader/advocate  Perception of the innovation  Collaborative relationship of the planning and design team  Internal characteristics of the organization  External characteristics of the organization, such as system openness and an engaged public Secondary factors:  Perceived competition from neighboring communities  Costs, economic benefits, and perceived return-on-investment  Presence of a long-range vision plan, including sustainability goals and indicators  A liberal/Democratic population
  34. 34. Implications for the Adoption of Innovation in the Planning and Design Process for Public Spaces
  35. 35. City of Kissimmee Lakefront Park Population 64,000
  36. 36. System Openness, Engaged Public
  37. 37. Perception of the Innovation
  38. 38. Long Range Vision Plan Glatting Jackson/ AECOM
  39. 39. Collaborative Relationships (+ Good Food) • Elected Officials • City Staff and Administration • Community Redevelopment Agency • Kissimmee Utility Authority • Business and Property Owners • Arts, Historical and Cultural Groups • Service Clubs • Consulting Team • Construction Manager
  40. 40. Strong Leadership, Advocacy Mayor Jim Swan,City Manager Mike Steigerwald Parks, Recreation, and Public Facilities Director Dan Loubier CRA Director Gail Hamilton
  41. 41. Benefits To-Date • Estimated 500,000 visitors annually • Improved lake habitat, storm water treatment • Increased downtown activity • $50 million new planned development • $17 million investment from the KUA • 5% increase in property values throughout downtown in 1st year • New direct and indirect employment • Pending RFQ for development of 6 acre utility site • Fee-based venues booked 40 weeks in advance: pavilions, wedding lawn, events space, community house
  42. 42. SUMMARY
  43. 43. Civic Spaces Should be Planned and Designed as Elements of the Public Realm
  44. 44. Public Realm Subsystems Should be Planned Concurrently • Parks and Civic Spaces • Transportation • Public Facilities • Stormwater, Utilities • Arts • Schools, Libraries • Others
  45. 45. Every Civic Space Should be Designed and Managed as a High Performance Public Space Social • Improve the neighborhood • Improve social and physical mobility • Encourage health and fitness • Provide relief from urban congestion, stressors • Provide places for formal and informal social gathering, art, performances, events • Provide opportunities for individual, group, passive and active recreation • Facilitate shared experiences among different groups • Attract diverse populations • Promote creative and constructive social interaction Environmental • Use energy, water, and resources efficiently • Improve water quality of both surface and ground water • Serve as a net carbon sink • Enhance, preserve, promote, or contribute to biological diversity • Hardscape materials selected for longevity of service, social/ cultural/ historical sustainability, regional availability, low carbon footprint • Provide opportunities to enhance environmental awareness and knowledge • Serve as an interconnected node within larger scale ecological corridors and natural habitat Economic • Create and facilitate revenue-generating opportunities for the public and/or the private sectors • Create meaningful and desirable employment • Indirectly create or sustain good, living wage jobs • Sustain or increase property values • Catalyze infill development and/or the re-use of obsolete or under-used buildings or spaces • Attract new residents • Attract new businesses • Generate increased business and tax revenues • Optimize operations and maintenance costs
  46. 46. Civic Spaces Should Focus on Experiences, Not Just Facilities • Places to play vs. playground • Places to relax vs. benches • Places to eat and socialize vs. picnic tables • Places to play ball vs. athletic fields • Places to play hoops vs. basketball court • Places to exercise vs. fitness center
  47. 47. Communities Should Conduct a Self-Audit Before Initiating a New Project Project Pre-Planning Checklist Primary Factors:  Presence of a strong leader/ advocate for the innovation  Collaborative relationship of the planning and design team  External characteristics, including system openness and stakeholder involvement Secondary Factors:  Costs, economic benefits, and perceived return-on-investment  Presence of a long-range vision Other Possible Factors:  Perception of the innovation  Internal characteristics of the organization  Funding  Passion
  48. 48. Erica Madsen, PE, LEED AP BD+C Foresite Group
  49. 49. Park Pride Creating High Performance Public Spaces March 23, 2015
  50. 50. Park Pride Creating High Performance Public Spaces March 23, 2015
  51. 51. Park Pride Creating High Performance Public Spaces March 23, 2015
  52. 52. Park Pride Creating High Performance Public Spaces March 23, 2015
  53. 53. Park Pride Creating High Performance Public Spaces March 23, 2015
  54. 54. Park Pride Creating High Performance Public Spaces March 23, 2015
  55. 55. Park Pride Creating High Performance Public Spaces March 23, 2015
  56. 56. Park Pride Creating High Performance Public Spaces March 23, 2015 QUESTIONS?

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