How to present a paper

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How to present a paper

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How to present a paper

  1. 1. How to Present a Technical paper Presented by: Shahidul Islam Khan Asst. Professor, CSE
  2. 2. How to Present a Scientific Paper Topics to Cover  Getting started  Displaying text  Displaying graphics  Animating  Presenting  Critiquing sample slides
  3. 3. Getting Started • Create a slide show that is an outline, not a script • Use the slide show...  to select important information and visuals  to organize content  to create a hierarchy
  4. 4. Getting Started • Set up Slide Master  Allows you to design the “look” of your slide show • Browse design templates or create your own
  5. 5. Getting Started To select a design, ask yourself:  In what type of room will I give my talk? • Well-lit room: use light background / dark text and visuals • Dimly-lit room: use dark background / light text and visuals
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  10. 10. Selecting Content • Consider your audience! • State problem/question clearly & early (title, abstract, intro) • Include significance • Include background: organism/system • Concisely state the “point of departure” for work
  11. 11. Selecting Content, Part 2 • Results: include the how & the why!  Hypothesis  Method (remember audience)  Show figures and guide audience through them  State authors’ conclusions; your agreement or disagreement • Summarize paper’s overall conclusions • Suggest areas for improvement; future investigations
  12. 12. Displaying Text • Remember that your audience...  skims each slide  looks for critical points, not details  needs help reading/ seeing text • Help your audience by…  Projecting a clear font  Using bullets  Using content-specific headings  Using short phrases  Using grammatical parallelism
  13. 13. Project a Clear Font • Serif: easy to read in printed documents  Times New Roman, Palatino, Garamond • Sans serif: easy to see projected across the room  Arial, Helvetica, Geneva
  14. 14. Use Bullets • Bullets help your audience  to skim the slide  to see relationships between information  organize information in a logical way • For example, this is Main Point 1, which leads to...  Sub-point 1 • Further subordinated point 1 • Further subordinated point 2  Sub-point 2
  15. 15. Use Content-Specific Headings • “Results” suggests the content area for a slide • “Substance X upregulates gene Y” (with data shown below) shows the audience what is observed
  16. 16. Use Short Phrases • Be clear, concise, accurate • Write complete sentences only in certain cases:  Hypothesis / problem statement  Quote  ??? Difficult to read DNA polymerase catalyzes elongation of DNA chains in the 5’ to 3’ direction Better DNA polymerase extends 5’ to 3’
  17. 17. Use Grammatical Parallelism • Use same grammatical form in lists • Not Parallel:  Cells were lysed in buffer  5 minute centrifuging of lysate  Removed supernatant • Parallel:  Lysed cells in buffer  Centrifuged lysate for 5 minutes  Removed supernatant
  18. 18. Displaying Visuals • Select visuals that enhance understanding  Figures from paper: evidence for argument  Figures from other sources (web; review articles): • Model a process or concept • Help explain background, context • Design easy-to-read visuals  Are the visuals easy to read by all members of your audience? • Draw attention to aspects of visuals
  19. 19. Simplify and Draw Attention http://www.indstate.edu/thcme/mwking/tca-cycle.html
  20. 20. Displaying Visuals Harvey et al. (2005) Cell 122:407-20
  21. 21. Choose Color Carefully
  22. 22. Cite Others’ Visuals http://www.bioc.rice.edu/~shamoo/shamoolab.html Harvey et al. (2005) Cell 122:407-20
  23. 23. Animating • Allows you to add text, visuals, or line work sequentially to the slide • Should be used purposefully (and sparingly!)  To aid in the audience’s ability to comprehend your message  Not solely for aesthetic purposes
  24. 24. Animating Use professional animation methods for text (avoid fly in, typewriter, etc.)
  25. 25. Presenting • Delivery • Handling questions
  26. 26. Delivery • Physical Environment • Stance  Body language  Handling notes • Gestures • Eye contact • Voice quality  Volume  Inflection  Pace
  27. 27. Handling Questions • LISTEN • Repeat or rephrase • Watch body language • Don’t pretend to know
  28. 28. Samples Features to consider: • Text  Fonts, use of phrases, parallelism • Visuals  Readability, drawing attention • Slide design • Organization/ hierarchy  Titles, bullets, arrangement of information, font size
  29. 29. 34 The Calcium IonThe Calcium Ion Calcium is a crucial cell-signaling moleculeCalcium is a crucial cell-signaling molecule –Calcium is toxic at high intracellular concentrations because of the phosphate- based system energy system –Intracellular concentrations of calcium are kept very low, which allows an influx of calcium to be a signal to alter transcription
  30. 30. 35 MicroarraysMicroarrays Phillips G. (2004) Iowa State University College of Veterinary Medicine.

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