Culturally, Linguistically and Economically Diverse

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Culturally, Linguistically and Economically Diverse

  1. 1. Culturally, Linguistically, and Economically Diverse Students by Dr. Paul A. Rodríguez
  2. 2. Some Starting Thoughts <ul><li>Since 1990, the ELL population in US public schools has increased 101% </li></ul><ul><li>Many are “economic refugees” </li></ul><ul><li>These are not the only students struggling with poverty & cultural differences – Many native born students face these same obstacles </li></ul>
  3. 3. Linguistic Diversity <ul><li>Obstacles to everyday communication </li></ul><ul><li>Obstacles to academic language </li></ul><ul><li>See Michalski ’s bibliographies for online language & linguistics resources and for multicultural read-alouds </li></ul>
  4. 4. Cultural Diversity <ul><li>Eye contact – to make or not to make? </li></ul><ul><li>How to address teachers & other adults </li></ul><ul><li>How to behave in a classroom – stay in seat, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>How/when to communicate with the teacher – absence work, conferences, concerns </li></ul>
  5. 5. Cultural Diversity <ul><li>How to work in groups – copy or own work </li></ul><ul><li>Different nonverbal communication – thumbs up, wave with palm showing, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>The meaning of laughter </li></ul><ul><li>Personal space </li></ul><ul><li>Keeping face & failure </li></ul><ul><li>Naming traditions </li></ul>
  6. 6. Economic Diversity <ul><li>The underlying characteristics of generational poverty have surface representations at school – see Michalski ’s charts </li></ul><ul><li>Ex.: Important relationships & the reliance on people to survive = Students decide if they will work in the classroom based on whether or not they like you. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Economic Diversity <ul><li>Rules of the middle class & high society </li></ul><ul><li>It is difficult for those students suffering from generational poverty to interface with the middle-class culture prevalent in most public schools (Michalski & Payne) </li></ul>
  8. 8. Core Elements of Teaching in a Diverse Classroom <ul><li>Organized, colorful environment </li></ul><ul><li>Student-centered classroom where they feel safe & comfortable working together & learning from each other </li></ul><ul><li>Their experiences appear in instruction </li></ul><ul><li>Photos, music, films related to content </li></ul><ul><li>Group & pair work – contribute what can </li></ul>
  9. 9. Core Elements of Teaching in a Diverse Classroom (cont.) <ul><li>Culturally diverse literature, music, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Cultural, national, international, & global perspectives </li></ul><ul><li>Supplementary materials </li></ul><ul><li>Similarities & universals of human experience </li></ul>
  10. 10. Resources <ul><li>Michalski, Marina. “Are We Speaking the Same Language Here? Considerations in Teaching Linguistically, Culturally, and Economically Diverse Students.” SDE National Conference on Differentiated Conference, Las Vegas, July 2007. </li></ul><ul><li>Payne, Ruby. (2001). A framework for understanding poverty. Highlands, TX: Aha! Process, Inc. </li></ul>

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