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Racialized media literacies: public discourse on migration and integration, and the new ’new racism’ in Europe  Dr Gavan T...
The  problem  of covered women in Cork? <ul><li>http://photos.examiner.ie/?Action=VF&id=543479810&pcp=441&ppwd=85623mgp </...
Mobile signifiers and public discourse on immigration/integration <ul><li>Processes of selection and translation beyond qu...
The very existence of fears about damage to the unity of the nation is proof that the unity of the nation is being threate...
Dominant public discourse and the political climate for  inclusion : <ul><li>Why is migration/integration generally approa...
Frustration, and counter-frustration :  <ul><li>‘ There can be no meaningful debate about immigration in Britain (or anywh...
The European ‘crisis of multiculturalism’
Idioms of multicultural ‘backlash’
Even in Sweden, eventually here… <ul><li>‘ From the point of view of security officials, there are risks inherent to a str...
New media economies, shifting publics,& migrants as subjects of concern <ul><li>” More than half of Helsinki parents are i...
Who inhabits the  imagined  centre ?
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Racialized media literacies: public discourse on migration and integration, and the new "new racism" in Europe

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Over at least the last decade, public debates across western Europe have witnessed a synchronous rejection of multiculturalism, a rejection made all the more puzzling by the singular lack of any meaningful era of multiculturalism in the first place. In the aftermath of the atrocities in Norway in July 2011, and as a result of the influence of online ‘immigration skeptic’ networks in Finland, attention has begun to be paid to the impact of the networked, transnational circulation of discourses of ‘multicultural failure’. This paper proposes a set of ideas for developing attention to these discourses, and their mediated travel, in terms of a history of ideological appropriation and ingestion by the far-right. However, it argues that it is only by examining this appropriation in the context of (a) ‘illiberal’ liberalism post 9/11 (b) the nature of political debate in neoliberal societies (c) the interplay between ‘mainstream’ and ‘alternative’ media in the digital age, that we can begin to account for its transnational coherence and power. On the basis of this structure, it examines how an initiative such as this can support migrant-led groups in developing online strategies that can thrive in this environment.

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Racialized media literacies: public discourse on migration and integration, and the new "new racism" in Europe

  1. 1. Racialized media literacies: public discourse on migration and integration, and the new ’new racism’ in Europe Dr Gavan Titley National University of Ireland, Maynooth
  2. 2. The problem of covered women in Cork? <ul><li>http://photos.examiner.ie/?Action=VF&id=543479810&pcp=441&ppwd=85623mgp </li></ul>
  3. 3. Mobile signifiers and public discourse on immigration/integration <ul><li>Processes of selection and translation beyond questions of sociological relevance; </li></ul><ul><li>Anxious imaginaries of future disintegration, as evidenced by elsewhere; </li></ul><ul><li>Speaking positions: the courage to confront taboo issues </li></ul>
  4. 4. The very existence of fears about damage to the unity of the nation is proof that the unity of the nation is being threatened… Martin Barker, The New Racism (1981)
  5. 5. Dominant public discourse and the political climate for inclusion : <ul><li>Why is migration/integration generally approached in public discourse as a problem which is not being properly addressed ? </li></ul><ul><li>How can these dynamics be explained in terms of communication processes and mediatization (without underplaying the generative political conditions and processes)? </li></ul><ul><li>In what ways do racialized literacies shape public discourse, and what does this mean for migrant-led anti-racism and inclusion initiatives, and those who support them? </li></ul>
  6. 6. Frustration, and counter-frustration : <ul><li>‘ There can be no meaningful debate about immigration in Britain (or anywhere else) that does not address neoliberal globalization, trade policy, development aid, colonial legacy…But that is not the debate we have been having. Indeed that is not a debate we have ever had. It’s not acccusations of racism that are stopping that conversation, but racism itself. For if there is a liberal elite out there thwarting discussion on immigration, it is doing a very bad job. The tabloids and middle market papers seem to talk about little else, and whenever they play their inflammatory tunes the politicians duly dance.’ </li></ul><ul><li>Gary Younge, ‘Yes we need an honest immigration debate, but this tough talk isn’t it’, The Guardian 26 April 2010. </li></ul>
  7. 7. The European ‘crisis of multiculturalism’
  8. 8. Idioms of multicultural ‘backlash’
  9. 9. Even in Sweden, eventually here… <ul><li>‘ From the point of view of security officials, there are risks inherent to a strong increase in immigration, which could lead to serious problems for security. Risk factors include increases in crime, gang formation, violence and disturbances of the peace. Such events have been seen in Europe – in Sweden and France, for instance…according to the prevailing opinion of European security officials, another danger in immigration is the infiltration of terrorists into the flow of immigrants…in certain suburbs of Helsinki and Turku, the proportion of foreigners in the population has risen as high as 30%. According to some studies, such a large concentration of immigrants can lead to uncontrolled ethnic isolation in the communities.’ </li></ul><ul><li>Ilkka Salmi & Jorma Vuorio, ‘Time running out for immigrant integration’, Helsingin Sanomat, 8 September 2009. </li></ul>
  10. 10. New media economies, shifting publics,& migrants as subjects of concern <ul><li>” More than half of Helsinki parents are in favour of quotas for immigrant pupils in classes…. Marjo Kyllönen, head of education at the Helsinki Education Department, points out that such immigrant quotas would violate the Finnish law that makes it the responsibility of local authorities to arrange mandatory education for children who reside in the municipality” </li></ul><ul><li>Helsingin Sanomat / TNS Gallup poll, 22 October 2011. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Who inhabits the imagined centre ?

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