Patterns in student & staff access to, and attitudes toward usefulness of, ICT in an Australian university<br />Peter Albi...
University of Southern Queensland<br />Major distance provider since 1970s<br />~20000 of ~25000 students study off campus...
Bridging distance for education <br />Digital technologies increase interaction<br />Students & staff need<br />Access<br ...
What about students & ICT?<br />
USQ mentoring project<br />
In this presentation<br />Faculty of Engineering & Surveying (FoES)<br />Student & staff data<br />Compared to other respo...
Background<br />21st century skills movement<br />Lifelong learning to be not about<br />Authentic activity as in PBL<br /...
2010 Horizon report<br />Key drivers<br />Abundant Internet resources<br />Expected anywhere & anytime access<br />Cloud-b...
Educating the Net Generation<br />3 Australian universities<br />2588 1st year students & 108 staff<br />Major findings<br...
Methodology<br />Based on Net Generation study<br />Adjustments for USQ context<br />Updated ICT references<br />Data coll...
Participants<br />Note: Online collection probably favoured respondents comfortable with ICT<br />
Gender<br />
Level of study<br />
Attendance<br />
Location & mode<br />
Ages<br />
Computers<br />
MP3 & camera access<br />
Mobile phone access<br />
Peripherals +<br />
Internet access<br />
Broadband Internetquality<br />
Reasons to use ICT for study<br />
Usefulness of creative ICT<br />
Usefulness of access via ICT<br />
Usefulness of messaging<br />
Conclusion<br />Students & staff broadly similar<br />Differences on mobility & content creation<br />FoES students report...
Questions<br />Peter AlbionJerry MaroulisRomina Jamieson-Proctor<br />University of Southern QueenslandAustralia<br />Pete...
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Patterns in student & staff access to, and attitudes toward usefulness of, ICT in an Australian university

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Presentation given at 3rd Regional Conference on Engineering Education and Research in Higher Education, Kuching, 8 June 2010

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  • Interaction is essential for learning – content, instructor &amp; peers (Moore)Internet increases opportunities relative to correspondence and telephoneEverybody needs access, positive attitudes, and capabilities
  • USQ students are scattered and diverse with varied access &amp; capabilities for ICTKnowing about students will inform course design to use ICTStaff can then be supported with enhanced learning as the result
  • Mentoring project begins with survey about ICTSelection of staff users as mentorsCascading approachImproved outcomes
  • As knowledge expands exponentially educational needs are changing21st century has abundant &amp; accessible information, need skills for processingLearning is lifelong and focused on being and doing rather than rememberingPBL provides for authentic learning for professionals including engineersOnline PBL using ICT has been found to work at USQ
  • Fewer than 10% have no/limited access to computer – perhaps using a shared computer at work or elsewhereMore than 50% have convenient access to both desktop and portable computersHigh compared to Australian population – 78% of households had computers in 2009Higher access to portables than previous studies – perhaps a trend toward mobility
  • MP3 access is lower than previous studies – those were younger students and there may be a generational difference
  • Student access to mobile phone is comparable to previous studiesStaff access is lower than students – generation effect or office phone access?Higher proportion of MP3 phones relative to earlier studies is progression of technology
  • Majority have convenient access to InternetFew have dial-up &amp; most of those also have broadband2009 – 72% of Australian homes had Internet, 62% had broadbandHigher values here are consistent with higher access in homes with studentsIncrease in broadband over previous studies is consistent with societal trends
  • FoES respondents stronger on immediate reasons = results &amp; students stronger than staffFoES respondents &amp; students lower on career related reasons
  • Students less favourable than staff toward content generation uses of ICT in study
  • Recordings are popular with most respondentsWeb access is approvedStudents less enthusiastic than staff about mobile phone access – they have more experience
  • General approval for interaction via instant messagingLess enthusiasm for SMS but still generally approved
  • Patterns in student & staff access to, and attitudes toward usefulness of, ICT in an Australian university

    1. 1. Patterns in student & staff access to, and attitudes toward usefulness of, ICT in an Australian university<br />Peter AlbionJerryMaroulisRomina Jamieson-ProctorUniversity of Southern QueenslandAustralia<br />
    2. 2. University of Southern Queensland<br />Major distance provider since 1970s<br />~20000 of ~25000 students study off campus<br />USQ 2020 vision<br />To be recognised as a world leader in open and flexible higher education<br />
    3. 3. Bridging distance for education <br />Digital technologies increase interaction<br />Students & staff need<br />Access<br />Attitudes<br />Capabilities<br />
    4. 4. What about students & ICT?<br />
    5. 5. USQ mentoring project<br />
    6. 6. In this presentation<br />Faculty of Engineering & Surveying (FoES)<br />Student & staff data<br />Compared to other responses<br />Descriptive presentation<br />Preliminary interpretations<br />
    7. 7. Background<br />21st century skills movement<br />Lifelong learning to be not about<br />Authentic activity as in PBL<br />Success with ICT in PBL for Engineering<br />Online PBL at USQ (Brodie, 2009)<br />
    8. 8. 2010 Horizon report<br />Key drivers<br />Abundant Internet resources<br />Expected anywhere & anytime access<br />Cloud-based services<br />Cross-disciplinary collaboration<br />Near future adoption<br />Mobile computing<br />
    9. 9. Educating the Net Generation<br />3 Australian universities<br />2588 1st year students & 108 staff<br />Major findings<br />No Digital Natives/Immigrants divide<br />Diversity in ICT experience & preferences<br />New technologies can enhance learning<br />Align pedagogy, technical & administrative<br />New skills for students & staff require effort<br />New technologies challenge current policy<br />
    10. 10. Methodology<br />Based on Net Generation study<br />Adjustments for USQ context<br />Updated ICT references<br />Data collection<br />Online using LimeSurvey, export to SPSS<br />Late 2009 (students) & early 2010 (staff)<br />Prizes offered as incentive<br />
    11. 11. Participants<br />Note: Online collection probably favoured respondents comfortable with ICT<br />
    12. 12. Gender<br />
    13. 13. Level of study<br />
    14. 14. Attendance<br />
    15. 15. Location & mode<br />
    16. 16. Ages<br />
    17. 17. Computers<br />
    18. 18. MP3 & camera access<br />
    19. 19. Mobile phone access<br />
    20. 20. Peripherals +<br />
    21. 21. Internet access<br />
    22. 22. Broadband Internetquality<br />
    23. 23. Reasons to use ICT for study<br />
    24. 24. Usefulness of creative ICT<br />
    25. 25. Usefulness of access via ICT<br />
    26. 26. Usefulness of messaging<br />
    27. 27. Conclusion<br />Students & staff broadly similar<br />Differences on mobility & content creation<br />FoES students reported<br />High access to mobile phones & similar<br />Limited belief in mobile phones for learning<br />Further investigation given trend to mobility<br />Potential value in regular audits<br />
    28. 28. Questions<br />Peter AlbionJerry MaroulisRomina Jamieson-Proctor<br />University of Southern QueenslandAustralia<br />Peter.Albion@usq.edu.auJerry.Maroulis@usq.edu.auRomina.Jamieson-Proctor@usq.edu.au<br />

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