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Patterns in student & staff access to, and attitudes toward usefulness of, ICT in an Australian university

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Presentation given at 3rd Regional Conference on Engineering Education and Research in Higher Education, Kuching, 8 June 2010

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Patterns in student & staff access to, and attitudes toward usefulness of, ICT in an Australian university

  1. 1. Patterns in student & staff access to, and attitudes toward usefulness of, ICT in an Australian university<br />Peter AlbionJerryMaroulisRomina Jamieson-ProctorUniversity of Southern QueenslandAustralia<br />
  2. 2. University of Southern Queensland<br />Major distance provider since 1970s<br />~20000 of ~25000 students study off campus<br />USQ 2020 vision<br />To be recognised as a world leader in open and flexible higher education<br />
  3. 3. Bridging distance for education <br />Digital technologies increase interaction<br />Students & staff need<br />Access<br />Attitudes<br />Capabilities<br />
  4. 4. What about students & ICT?<br />
  5. 5. USQ mentoring project<br />
  6. 6. In this presentation<br />Faculty of Engineering & Surveying (FoES)<br />Student & staff data<br />Compared to other responses<br />Descriptive presentation<br />Preliminary interpretations<br />
  7. 7. Background<br />21st century skills movement<br />Lifelong learning to be not about<br />Authentic activity as in PBL<br />Success with ICT in PBL for Engineering<br />Online PBL at USQ (Brodie, 2009)<br />
  8. 8. 2010 Horizon report<br />Key drivers<br />Abundant Internet resources<br />Expected anywhere & anytime access<br />Cloud-based services<br />Cross-disciplinary collaboration<br />Near future adoption<br />Mobile computing<br />
  9. 9. Educating the Net Generation<br />3 Australian universities<br />2588 1st year students & 108 staff<br />Major findings<br />No Digital Natives/Immigrants divide<br />Diversity in ICT experience & preferences<br />New technologies can enhance learning<br />Align pedagogy, technical & administrative<br />New skills for students & staff require effort<br />New technologies challenge current policy<br />
  10. 10. Methodology<br />Based on Net Generation study<br />Adjustments for USQ context<br />Updated ICT references<br />Data collection<br />Online using LimeSurvey, export to SPSS<br />Late 2009 (students) & early 2010 (staff)<br />Prizes offered as incentive<br />
  11. 11. Participants<br />Note: Online collection probably favoured respondents comfortable with ICT<br />
  12. 12. Gender<br />
  13. 13. Level of study<br />
  14. 14. Attendance<br />
  15. 15. Location & mode<br />
  16. 16. Ages<br />
  17. 17. Computers<br />
  18. 18. MP3 & camera access<br />
  19. 19. Mobile phone access<br />
  20. 20. Peripherals +<br />
  21. 21. Internet access<br />
  22. 22. Broadband Internetquality<br />
  23. 23. Reasons to use ICT for study<br />
  24. 24. Usefulness of creative ICT<br />
  25. 25. Usefulness of access via ICT<br />
  26. 26. Usefulness of messaging<br />
  27. 27. Conclusion<br />Students & staff broadly similar<br />Differences on mobility & content creation<br />FoES students reported<br />High access to mobile phones & similar<br />Limited belief in mobile phones for learning<br />Further investigation given trend to mobility<br />Potential value in regular audits<br />
  28. 28. Questions<br />Peter AlbionJerry MaroulisRomina Jamieson-Proctor<br />University of Southern QueenslandAustralia<br />Peter.Albion@usq.edu.auJerry.Maroulis@usq.edu.auRomina.Jamieson-Proctor@usq.edu.au<br />

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