Challenges in abundance: Higher education & learning to learn

617 views

Published on

Keynote presentation for International Conference on Teaching and Learning in Higher Education 2011, Melaka, Malaysia, 21-23 November 2011

Published in: Education, Technology
  • Be the first to comment

Challenges in abundance: Higher education & learning to learn

  1. 1. Challenges inabundance:Higher education &learning to learnPeter AlbionDigital Learning Research NetworkFaculty of Education, USQ
  2. 2. Traditionaleducationbrought us thisfar but the wayforward isunclear. Photo: Thomas Hawk CC (by)(nc)(sa)
  3. 3. “What teachers do with learning in the next ten years will determine the future of the world” (Stephen Heppell, 2011) - YouTube
  4. 4. Educationdeveloped totransferinformationto the young. Photo: Thiophene_Guy CC (by)(nc)(sa)
  5. 5. Now information is abundant and changing. Photo: mikebaird CC (by)
  6. 6. We mustpreparegraduates towork withabundantinformation. Photo: Svante Adermark CC (by) (nc)
  7. 7. Information is not frozen. It flows. Milford Sound Road, New Zealand, Dec 2007
  8. 8. Traditional education transmittedinformation from teacher to learner. Microsoft ClipArt
  9. 9. Information changed slowly. Moiry Glacier, Switzerland, Jul 2006
  10. 10. Access was often restricted. Photo: rosefirerising CC (by) (nc) (nd)
  11. 11. Learnerswerepreparedfor life. Microsoft ClipArt
  12. 12. Four technological waves havechanged information ecology. Photo: Kanakas Paradise Life CC (by) (nc)
  13. 13. Desktop publishing enabled anybodyto publish in print. Photo: Marcin Wichary CC (by)
  14. 14. The World Wide Web made a singledocument available globally. Microsoft ClipArt
  15. 15. Web 2.0 enabled easy publicationon the Web. Go2Web20
  16. 16. MobileInternet allowsaccess andpublicationfromanywhere. Callum, 2010
  17. 17. Understanding of knowledge hasevolved as information has expanded. Photo: patriziasoliani CC (by) (nc)
  18. 18. Objectivist knowledge exists independently – itcan be owned and transmitted. Photo: Thomas Hawk CC (by) (nc)
  19. 19. Constructivist knowledge exists in the learner– it is built from personal experience. Microsoft ClipArt
  20. 20. Connectivist knowledge exists in the network– learning is making connections. Microsoft ClipArt
  21. 21. Education should reflect the real world. Milford Sound Road, New Zealand, Dec 2007
  22. 22. The world isswimming ininformation. Annecy, France, Jul 2006
  23. 23. Totalinformation isgrowingexponentially.Some is quicklymade obsolete. Knight, P. T. (1997). The Half-Life of Knowledge and Structural Reform of the Education Sector for the Global Knowledge-Based Economy. Retrieved April 17, 2009, from http://www.knight-moore.com/pubs/halflife.html
  24. 24. Informationis notdiminishedby sharing.
  25. 25. Attention flows toward information.… if you have any particular piece of informationon the Net, you can share it easily with anyoneelse who might want it. It is not in any wayscarce, and therefore it is not an informationeconomy towards which we are moving … Thereis something else that moves through the Net,flowing in the opposite direction frominformation, namely attention. Goldhaber, M. H. (1997). The Attention Economy and the Net. First Monday, 2(4). Retrieved from http://firstmonday.org/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/519/440
  26. 26. Is the information economy reallyan attention economy? Photo: Steve McFarland CC (by) (nc)
  27. 27. The World is Flat (Friedman, 2006) Image: Eva the weaver CC (by) (nc) (sa)
  28. 28. Three digital revolutions ➙ new kind of learner Lee Rainie, Pew Internet Project, 2011
  29. 29. New learners are:• More self directed• Better equipped for new information sources• More reliant on feedback & response• More inclined to collaboration• More open to cross-disciplinary work• More oriented to people as producers Lee Rainie, Pew Internet Project, 2011
  30. 30. Abundance ➙ a relationship economyWorldview Consumer economy Relationship economyUnderlying assumption Scarcity AbundanceGoal Ownership MembershipYou prize Proprietary secrets Openness, transparencyTo build Barriers Links and relationshipsTo get Involuntary lock-in Voluntary loyaltySell to Target markets Natural audiencesSell via Consumer marketing Social dynamicsAwareness through Branding, advertising Personal advocacyTrust? Buy it Earn itPeople are Untrustworthy More trustworthy than we think Jerry Michalski, The REXpedition, 2011
  31. 31. Lectures were never like this. Photo: Ngo Quang Minh CC (by)(nc)
  32. 32. • Learning is acquiringOur tradition informationhas been • Information is scarce and hard to findpedagogies of • Trust authority for good informationscarcity. • Authorised information is beyond discussion • Obey the authority, and • Follow along Martin Weller, A Pedagogy of Abundance, 2010
  33. 33. Learner • User-generated contentexperience of • Power of the crowdinformation in • Data accessthe world is • Architecture of participationone of • Network effectsabundance. • Openness Martin Weller, A Pedagogy of Abundance, 2010
  34. 34. • Content is freePedagogies • Content is abundantof abundance • • Content is varied Sharing is easyshould • Learning is social • Connections are ‘light’recognize • Organisation is cheapthat: • • Systems are generative Users generate content Martin Weller, A Pedagogy of Abundance, 2010
  35. 35. Education should prepare lifelong learners. Photo: jcfrog CC (by)
  36. 36. Most learning occurs outside classes. Jane Hart, Learning in the social workplace, 2011
  37. 37. Learning is social by nature. Frederic Domon, Socialearning, 2011
  38. 38. Personal learning networks supportlifelong learning. David Warlick, Learning & leading with technology, 2009
  39. 39. The sage can work at the side. Clark Quinn, Learnlets, 2011
  40. 40. • Resource-based learningSome (RBL)established • Problem-based learning (PBL)pedagogies • Challenge-based learningrecognize (CBL) • Constructivismabundance. • Communities of practice • Connectivism Martin Weller, A Pedagogy of Abundance, 2010
  41. 41. Technology pedagogy and curriculum – EDP4130• Required undergraduate course• Final year teacher preparation• Major assessment is class project – Develop curriculum resource available to all – Requires collaboration, access to sources, publication• Challenging but valuable for students – Authentic, collaborative task – Characteristics of PBL
  42. 42. Emerging environments for learning – EDU8111• Graduate elective course• Concept is for students to construct course – Select and explore relevant topic – Publish in class wiki, open to all – Remains as foundation for next cohort• First task uses social bookmarking to gather resources• Uses freely available content• Students generate content by adding value
  43. 43. Contemporary issues conference – EDU8719• Postgraduate course, required for some students• Designed as an academic conference• Students – Submit and peer review paper proposals – Prepare and review full papers – Record a short presentation – Engage in discussion of papers• Some student-generated content is publishable• Develops skills for professional interaction
  44. 44. Abundance presents new challengesfor learning and teaching. Photo: Graeme Newcomb CC (by)
  45. 45. Easy access toinformationmakes misusepossible. Microsoft ClipArt
  46. 46. Connectedworkingrequirescollaborationskills. Microsoft ClipArt
  47. 47. Collaborative learning makesdisconnected assessment problematic. Microsoft Clipart
  48. 48. Educationdeveloped totransferinformationto the young. Photo: Thiophene_Guy CC (by)(nc)(sa)
  49. 49. Now information is abundant and changing. Photo: mikebaird CC (by)
  50. 50. We need topreparegraduates towork withabundantinformation. Photo: Svante Adermark CC (by) (nc)
  51. 51. Challenges inabundance:Higher education &learning to learnPeter AlbionDigital Learning Research NetworkFaculty of Education, USQPeter.Albion@usq.edu.au

×