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Material Culture

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Colonial Latin America

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Material Culture

  1. 1. Source CitationsMaya. Plate with Maize God. New Orleans Museum of Art. Oct. 26 2011. <http://noma.org/collection/detail/45/Plate- with-Maize-God>Maya. Vessel with Deity Figures. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Oct. 26 2011. <http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/50005977? rpp=60&pg=2&ao=on&ft=*&who=Maya&pos=69>Maya. Vessel 1. Foundation for the Advancement of Mesoamerican Studies, Inc. Nov. 1 2011. <http://www.famsi.org/research/kerr/articles/hero_twins/index.html>Maya. The Head of the Maize God. The Mesoamerican Ball Game : Photo Repository. Nov. 1 2011. <http://themesoamericanballgame.wikispaces.com/Photo+Repository>Nopiloa. Ball Player. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Oct. 26 2011. <http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search- the-collections/50008934>Maya. Mural from South Ballcourt, El Tajin. Museum Syndicate. Nov. 4 2011. <http://www.museumsyndicate.com/item.php?item=36794>Maya. Codex-Style Vase with Sixty Hieroglyphs. Library of Congress. Nov. 4 2011. <http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/kislak/kislak-exhibit.html>Maya. North Ballcourt of Tajin. El Tajin Archaeological Ruins. Oct. 26 2011. <http://www.delange.org/ElTajin2/ElTajin2.htm>
  2. 2. Source Citations (continued)

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