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Content-Driven Link Building: What Does Good Look Like?

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Presented by Paddy Moogan at Learn Inbound in Dublin, 2018.

Published in: Marketing

Content-Driven Link Building: What Does Good Look Like?

  1. 1. Content-Driven Link Building: What Does Good Look Like?
  2. 2. My dream job, discovered in Dublin
  3. 3. How do you get links?
  4. 4. It’s easy…
  5. 5. Create an interactive piece of content...
  6. 6. …using data visualization…
  7. 7. …in map format…
  8. 8. …published as a full page takeover…
  9. 9. …and pitch into B2C press.
  10. 10. These trends are accurate for Aira clients
  11. 11. They are going to be different for your own clients
  12. 12. You have different strengths, clients and processes
  13. 13. I’ll show you the system we’re using to determine these trends
  14. 14. What does good link building look like?
  15. 15. 70 links – is this good?
  16. 16. 90 links – is this good?
  17. 17. 1,000 links – this kicks both their asses
  18. 18. 70 links doesn’t look as good now
  19. 19. It’s not just about links though, right? We’re trying to send more traffic and revenue
  20. 20. Source – Aira Client – low traffic, high LTV 65% organic traffic growth – B2B space
  21. 21. How many links does 65% traffic growth need?
  22. 22. 50 links…
  23. 23. …to 9 content pieces…
  24. 24. ...over 12 months
  25. 25. The client are happy – they have some great links and organic traffic growth
  26. 26. 70 links – this was just to one piece
  27. 27. Is going “viral” good? Is this what clients actually want?
  28. 28. We often get caught up with the “viral” campaigns which people like me talk about on stage and in blog posts
  29. 29. Little secret – viral link campaigns are not the norm
  30. 30. We (rightly) look for things we can learn from these big hits
  31. 31. What about all the other campaigns that do well, but don’t go viral?
  32. 32. It’s not about going viral, it’s about sustainable link building
  33. 33. I’ll take consistency over going viral every single time
  34. 34. We have over 170 client campaigns and thousands of links
  35. 35. What can we learn from those?
  36. 36. How do we set expectations with stakeholders on what we can do?
  37. 37. We explain our strategy to clients
  38. 38. True strategy is about placing bets and making hard choices. The objective is not to eliminate risk but to increase the odds of success. Source
  39. 39. True strategy is about placing bets and making hard choices. The objective is not to eliminate risk but to increase the odds of success. Source
  40. 40. We talk to clients about our processes
  41. 41. We talk about our other client case studies
  42. 42. We talk about the tactics that are available to us
  43. 43. A few things that we do Data Visualisation • Static Graphics • Interactive Content • Animation Thought leadership • Guest posting • Reactive commentary • Interviews Tactical • Unlinked brand mentions • Broken link building • Citations
  44. 44. I’ve presented about all of these at different events
  45. 45. It’s not good enough
  46. 46. Explaining processes, tactics & case studies isn’t good enough
  47. 47. They don’t answer the questions that clients ask most
  48. 48. “How many links will we get?”
  49. 49. ”How much traffic will we get?”
  50. 50. “How long will that take?”
  51. 51. “Which approach is best?”
  52. 52. “Will this work?”
  53. 53. They set client expectations for how we do what we do
  54. 54. But doesn’t do a good job of what could work for them
  55. 55. We need a data-led system to better answer their questions
  56. 56. This is very important for content-driven link builders to get better at
  57. 57. Paid search and social is not going away, it’s only getting bigger
  58. 58. All clients need to have paid traffic as part of their digital marketing strategy
  59. 59. It’s much easier to predict ROI and answer tricky client questions when it comes to paid search and social
  60. 60. We need to get better at it to measure the impact of content-driven link building
  61. 61. I’ll show you our system for starting to do this and the trends it’s shown so far
  62. 62. Where all of this started
  63. 63. Started with this guy
  64. 64. Me, Mark and Phil after a few whiskeys
  65. 65. markjohnstone.co @epicgraphic
  66. 66. Mark helped us map out all of our content pieces against two attributes – how difficult a piece was to create, and how successful it was
  67. 67. We could easily see which content pieces were easy to create and successful – then patterns started to emerge
  68. 68. This is what it looked like – each dot is a content piece
  69. 69. What this has developed into
  70. 70. We’ve analyzed…
  71. 71. 2.5 years of work
  72. 72. 4,500 pieces of coverage
  73. 73. 3,500 links
  74. 74. 170 client campaigns
  75. 75. 20 clients
  76. 76. 1 bloody big Google Sheet
  77. 77. We’ve added attributes to every single link and campaign
  78. 78. Launch date Industry Nofollow Mention Format User input Type of story Type of data viz Full page takeover B2B v B2C
  79. 79. What we’re doing with it
  80. 80. Learn what works across industries and clients
  81. 81. Feed this back into strategy
  82. 82. Set expectations with clients
  83. 83. The trends
  84. 84. Caveat – this is what our data is telling us. Your trends are very likely to be different
  85. 85. Which content formats perform best?
  86. 86. Average Total Coverage
  87. 87. Does data visualization work?
  88. 88. We use a David McCandless cheatsheet
  89. 89. An example of our own data visualization
  90. 90. An example of non-data viz content
  91. 91. Average Total Coverage
  92. 92. What type of visualiztion works best?
  93. 93. Does a particular graph work better?
  94. 94. This?
  95. 95. Or this?
  96. 96. Or this?
  97. 97. Or this?
  98. 98. This is just as much about the content and story
  99. 99. Average Total Coverage
  100. 100. Do full page takeovers work better than templated pages?
  101. 101. This is a full-page takeover
  102. 102. This is content within a blog template
  103. 103. Average Total Coverage
  104. 104. Is B2B harder than B2C?
  105. 105. Average Total Coverage
  106. 106. Average Total Coverage But B2B is more likely to get followed links
  107. 107. Are nofollow links becoming more common?
  108. 108. Source
  109. 109. % of overall coverage
  110. 110. Nofollow links have stayed pretty stable % of overall coverage
  111. 111. It’s mentions that are more popular over time % of overall coverage
  112. 112. How do industries compare?
  113. 113. Average Total Coverage
  114. 114. We don’t think certain industries are necessarily harder than others
  115. 115. We think that it just takes time to become effective and efficient across industries
  116. 116. In summary
  117. 117. I don’t actually care if you use this system
  118. 118. But you should be using some kind of system
  119. 119. Analyze your results across these metrics (or others)
  120. 120. Use this to spot what works for you and your clients
  121. 121. Share with clients to manage expectations (and your own)
  122. 122. Don’t get fooled into following the latest content trends
  123. 123. Use processes, tactics, case studies and data to inform strategy & set expectations
  124. 124. Thank you! paddy@aira.net

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