Engaging and informing young people

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  • Introduction -
  • Patrick
  • PatrickNotesfrom a chat session – user talking about accessing support about self harm
  • Patrick Breaking it into steps
  • Emma -Clarifying the purpose of TheSite.org We identified that one barrier to accessing our information was that people don’t understand when they hear about TheSite.org, or first arrive at it, what it’s for. We needed to make our aims clearer. We realised we needed to clearly explain our purpose – so we’ll make the ‘about us’ page more obvious. We’re removing clutter from touchpoints like Homepages – only have relevant information visibleShout about what we offer – prove we’re trustworthy. We’re non-biased, non-judgemental, factually accurate. SEO articles better (using Google adwords/search logs/common sense) – eg. Bedroom Horrors – turned out to be about bedbugs. More people searching on bedbugs.Improve calls to action encouraging users to try out different parts of website, for example our local advice finder, which helps people identify support organisations local to them, and the community forum where people can get first hand peer support and advice.
  • Patrick
  • Patrick - Search terms – from a month on TheSite.org – deciphering what this meansBarrier #1 – search
  • Patrick - Findingyour water cooler…Barrier #2 – can they make contact with those producing the information?
  • Patrick -Overcoming barriers #1- Building a space where you have dialogue and contact with the young people you’re aiming to reach
  • Emma - Overcoming barriers #2- Practical SEO – interpreting what needs/purpose is from SEO data Understanding internal and external search logs - helps you imagine how users could be connected to your content. For example according to our external search logs, one of our most searched articles is on pro rata payBecause we’re filling a nicheWe’re then able to start thinking about other information gaps We’re able to use our search logs to find out how people are searching and tailor our keywords (titles/headers/straplines/subheads) to fit (eg. Bleeding bum – not bum blood).
  • Emma – using Information architecture – overcoming barriers to delivering information on TheSite.orgFirst identify your audience – how? User testing Personas Feedback/user interactionSearch logs (internal and external)Decide who you need to reach and what they’d like to see. (Handout – persona template)Consulting our usersLifetracks.com NING consultation group. We consulted a cross section of our users on: DesignArticle templates Tone of voice Content ideas
  • Differences depending on the topics
  • Building personas
  • Overcoming barriers to understanding information on TheSite.org– text or video? How do you decide which medium works best for which type of information? Words are useful for: Developing tone of voice. TheSite.org aims to be like a big brother or sister – warm but not patronising, friendly but never making assumptions or judging. Funny but not trying too hard. (Handout – add example article)Establishing trust. Grammar and spelling are important - they suggest factual accuracy (but don’t replace it).Getting across complex information (web-links, phone numbers, different parliamentary acts). Must-have information should always be available as text so users can refer to it again and again. Write for the web – short sentences; clear meanings; few puns; break up text with headers (good for SEO).Multimedia is useful for: Helping people find new ways of seeing/absorbing information. Use example of Lifetracks – we developed an interactive payslip to show people, rather than tell them, what should be on a payslip so they can work out if they’re being paid enough. (Handout – add screen shot + on powerpoint presentation)Developing compelling stories. Never underestimate the emotional impact of a video, even very simply shot (show bullying video?)Giving your audience an individual they can relate to – someone their age, who looks like them and sounds like them. Giving them something to share on their Facebook page (they’re more likely to share video). Pictures: Pictures make your site look pretty, inviting, appealing. They’re important. But they become white noise for users unless they feature real people. Stock-shots, are background buzz (cf Neilson research). Aim to use real people whenever you can and if you can’t, use a good picture – one with an interesting angle, good colour, something that makes a visual statement.  Style - butters, mither, twocking. Obvs?We try to avoid vicar at a disco syndrome – we never use text speak or randomly insert the letter X or Z into words. We avoid referring to young people as teenagers, youth/youths, kids or CYP. We use slang cautiously. It dates quickly and may mean different things to different people (eg. ‘fit’). It doesn’t always translate across regional borders and may glamourise or normalise harmful practices (e.g ‘shotting’). Ditto swearing. We swear rarely and usually only in reported speech. Some swearing is still not really acceptable – eg we have an article called Fuck Buddies but we’d probably never use the C-word because we run the risk of offending everyone from Mail readers to ardent feminists.
  • Words are useful for: Developing tone of voice. TheSite.org aims to be like a big brother or sister – warm but not patronising, friendly but never making assumptions or judging. Funny but not trying too hard. (Handout – add example article)Establishing trust. Grammar and spelling are important - they suggest factual accuracy (but don’t replace it).Getting across complex information (web-links, phone numbers, different parliamentary acts). Must-have information should always be available as text so users can refer to it again and again. Write for the web – short sentences; clear meanings; few puns; break up text with headers (good for SEO).Multimedia is useful for: Helping people find new ways of seeing/absorbing information. Use example of Lifetracks – we developed an interactive payslip to show people, rather than tell them, what should be on a payslip so they can work out if they’re being paid enough. (Handout – add screen shot + on powerpoint presentation)Developing compelling stories. Never underestimate the emotional impact of a video, even very simply shot (show bullying video?)Giving your audience an individual they can relate to – someone their age, who looks like them and sounds like them. Giving them something to share on their Facebook page (they’re more likely to share video).
  • Pictures: Pictures make your site look pretty, inviting, appealing. They’re important. But they become white noise for users unless they feature real people. Stock-shots, are background buzz (cf Neilson research). Aim to use real people whenever you can and if you can’t, use a good picture – one with an interesting angle, good colour, something that makes a visual statement.
  • Style - butters, mither, twocking. Obvs?We try to avoid vicar at a disco syndrome – we never use text speak or randomly insert the letter X or Z into words. We avoid referring to young people as teenagers, youth/youths, kids or CYP. We use slang cautiously. It dates quickly and may mean different things to different people (eg. ‘fit’). It doesn’t always translate across regional borders and may glamourise or normalise harmful practices (e.g ‘shotting’). Ditto swearing. We swear rarely and usually only in reported speech. Some swearing is still not really acceptable – eg we have an article called Fuck Buddies but we’d probably never use the C-word because we run the risk of offending everyone from Mail readers to ardent feminists.
  • Engaging and informing young people

    1. 1. Engaging and informing young people: creating online content for 16-25 year olds<br />
    2. 2. Patrick Daniels<br />Head of Engagement and Support<br />Emma Rubach<br />Head of Editorial<br />Providing online youth information in the UK since 1995<br />
    3. 3. Barriers…<br />…and how we overcome them<br />Engaging and informing go hand in hand<br />
    4. 4. Moderator: “what is it that you're afraid of?”<br />User: “hmm... just their reaction, taking the first step to getting hlp”<br />
    5. 5.
    6. 6. Purpose: The “why?”<br />Give young people a reason to want to find you<br />
    7. 7. “What can we do <br />to help?”<br />“What can they help me with?”<br />Organisation’s perspective<br />Young person’s perspective<br />
    8. 8.
    9. 9.
    10. 10.
    11. 11.
    12. 12. Layout: The “where?”<br />Make it as easy as possible for young people to be able to find you<br />
    13. 13. “Who do we need to reach?”<br />“How do we <br />reach you?”<br />Organisation’s perspective<br />Young person’s perspective<br />
    14. 14. <ul><li>Broad appeal
    15. 15. Holistic approach
    16. 16. Generic information
    17. 17. Specific age group
    18. 18. Specific issue
    19. 19. Personal support</li></li></ul><li>Cross topic comparison<br />8<br />7<br />11<br />3<br />2<br />18<br />4<br />24<br />15<br />1<br />2<br />Magazines<br />Friends<br />An online ‘help-site’<br />Other <br />7<br />10<br />13<br />14<br />Internet search (e.g. Google)<br />Parents<br />A help-line<br />None of these<br />15<br />4<br />2<br />27<br />Online forums / discussion groups<br />Brothers or sisters<br />A professional / expert<br />47<br />3<br />27<br />2<br />3<br />7<br />3<br />14<br />9<br />10<br />11<br />13<br />6<br />8<br />33<br />2<br />2<br />17<br />4<br />1<br />9<br />2<br />1<br />5<br />9<br />5<br />15<br />7<br />5<br />2<br />14<br />3<br />3<br />1<br />7<br />6<br />3<br />1<br />18<br />13<br />5<br />12<br />16<br />3<br />6<br />12<br />8<br />Question 7: Which one source of advice would you turn to first for information or advice about very sensitive concerns relating to…?<br />Alcohol<br />Sex <br />Relationships<br />Drugs<br />Finance<br />Health<br />
    20. 20. I can talk about things online that I can’t talk about to people face to face <br />%<br />Does not apply to me<br />100<br />1<br />1<br />2<br />2<br />3<br />2<br />2<br />3<br />1<br />1<br />1<br />1<br />1<br />1<br />1<br />1<br />8<br />8<br />9<br />10<br />9<br />12<br />11<br />12<br />90<br />8<br />Don’t know<br />13<br />14<br />14<br />80<br />18<br />14<br />14<br />15<br />70<br />25<br />26<br />23<br />Disagree strongly<br />23<br />60<br />23<br />21<br />23<br />23<br />50<br />Disagree slightly<br />32<br />40<br />30<br />31<br />31<br />31<br />29<br />32<br />33<br />30<br />Neither agree nor disagree<br />20<br />24<br />22<br />20<br />10<br />19<br />19<br />18<br />16<br />14<br />0<br />Agree slightly<br />Agree strongly<br />Male<br />Female<br />16-18<br />19-21<br />22-24<br />ABC1<br />C2DE<br />Total<br />Gender<br />Age<br />Social Grade<br />
    21. 21.
    22. 22. Format: The “how?”<br />Once they’ve found you, make your information accessible<br />
    23. 23. “Is our message clear?”<br />“Can I trust this information?”<br />Organisation’s perspective<br />Young person’s perspective<br />
    24. 24.
    25. 25. Using pictures…<br />
    26. 26. butters, mither, twocking. Obvs?<br />
    27. 27. Activity<br />Think of the barriers and obstacles that young people may face in accessing your information – add these to a spider diagram.<br />Next together – explore the different ways young people may be able to overcome these barriers, either with or without direct support from your organisation.<br />
    28. 28. Thank you!<br />Patrick Daniels<br />Head of Engagement and Support<br />patrick.daniels@youthnet.org<br />Emma Rubach<br />Head of Editorial<br />emma.rubach@youthnet.org<br />

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