Sustainable Landscape Design by Joni L Janecki & Assoc.

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This slide show describes the landscape design for the Packard Foundation's green headquarters. It includes a description of the goals, strategies and choices made to ensure water efficiency and water stewardship. The presentation includes photographs, landscape plans and plant choices (90% of plantings are native to California) and describes the rainwater recapture system.

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Sustainable Landscape Design by Joni L Janecki & Assoc.

  1. 1. D A V I D & L U C I L E P A C K A R D F O U N D A T I O N 3 4 3 S E C O N D S T R E E T , L O S A L T O S SUSTAINABLE LANDSCAPE DESIGN: • WATER MANAGEMENT • REGIONALLY-SOURCED MATERIALS • CALIFORNIA NATIVE PLANTS JONI L. JANECKI & ASSOCIATES, INC. LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS 515 SWIFT STREET, SANTA CRUZ (831) 423-6040 / WWW.JLJA.COM
  2. 2. P R O J E C T O V E R V I E W © 2012, Jeremy Bittermann • The project’s key goals include: - achieve Net Zero Energy Use and LEED Platinum certification - be a “good neighbor” to the surrounding community by fitting into neighborhood scale and prioritizing the streetscape - provide indoor/outdoor work spaces - orient the buildings on site to maximize natural light inside - use locally-sourced materials - use native and regionally- adapted plants that are drought tolerant and require minimal amounts of fertilizer - design a landscape that provides habitat for birds and butterflies
  3. 3. D E S I G N C O N C E P T • Pull the building apart to create a central courtyard that... - maximizes daylight to interiors - provides outside views for all offices - allows for interior/exterior flow and work spaces • Courtyard whose main features are... - stone drainage channel that provides the seam between the buildings - two distinct California landscapes on either side of the seam: woodland and grassland - large deciduous trees that cool the building in the summer - flexible seating that encourages use of the courtyard by small and large groups Sketch by EHDD
  4. 4. L A N D S C A P E P L A N V I E W Staff Parking Lots Second Street / Rain Gardens San Antonio Rd. Courtyard Expansion Space Entry Roof Garden Visitor Parking Lot
  5. 5. S U S T A I N A B I L I T Y I N T H E L A N D S C A P E - Visitor Parking Lot • Repetition of materials found throughout the site leads visitors to building entrance across the street • Use of colored concrete pavers with a Solar Reflectivity Index greater than 29 reduces urban heat island effect • Paving drains to a vegetated swale along the parking edge to capture stormwater run-off • Placement of elevated photovoltaic panels and trees required careful planning to avoid competition
  6. 6. E X T E R I O R S P A C E S - Entry • Entry experience is inviting and welcoming • Incorporates materials found throughout site, reflecting entire campus • Stone paving carefully laid to assist in way- finding, leading visitors from parking lot to entry • Entry oak anchors building and ties landscape to larger California landscape • Oak was grown in Clear Lake from an acorn collected in San Mateo County 20+ years ago Photo by Kris Knutson
  7. 7. E X T E R I O R S P A C E S - Roof Planting • The green roof is a reflection of California’s unique micro-climates – an eddy in the larger campus landscape • The lightweight planting medium, minimal soil, extremes of heat and cold as well as sun and shade, and episodic water meant that roof plantings could not replicate the grassland or woodland plant palette present on the rest of the site • Soil depth starts at 6” next to the building and builds to 10” at outer edge Photo by Kris Knutson
  8. 8. JLJA selected a tapestry of succulents, plus one grass species, to provide flexibility in case any particular species did not survive the harsh environment. • Echeveria imbricata (Hens and Chicks) • Festuca glauca (Common Blue Fescue) • Sedum sediforme (Pale Stonecrop) • Sedum spathulifolium (Broadleaf Stonecrop) • Sedum spurium ‘Voodoo’ (Voodoo Stonecrop) • Thymus praecox arcticus ‘Elfin’ (Creeping Thyme) • Thymus pseudolanuginosus (Woolly Thyme) • Thymus vulgaris (Common Thyme) E X T E R I O R S P A C E S - Roof Planting
  9. 9. E X T E R I O R S P A C E S - Courtyard • Courtyard plantings -- grassland/meadow on one side of the seam, woodland on the other – reflect two distinct California landscapes and respond to different light conditions • Multiple seating options allow the courtyard to be tailored to a wide variety of uses by individuals, small groups, and large gatherings • The infiltration trench is key to stormwater management: - courtyard paving pitches towards trench - below-grade trench collects and holds water so it slowly percolates down into the soil
  10. 10. E X T E R I O R S P A C E S - Courtyard • London plane trees were selected two years before installation and contract grown specifically for this project. - Trees are deciduous for building climate control: providing cooling shade in the summer and more sun and light after leaves drop in winter - Size: tall enough to shade building, but not to block rooftop solar panels; wide enough to fill space, but not to overwhelm - Roots: not invasive or prone to pavement upheaval
  11. 11. E X T E R I O R S P A C E S - Expansion Space • The Packard Foundation was particularly concerned with the site’s edges and its relationship to its neighbors – the Expansion Space was crucial to maintaining a welcoming, pedestrian- friendly site • The large area needed to be appealing from a variety of experiences: groundplane, second story of building, and pedestrian and vehicular views along San Antonio Road and Second Street
  12. 12. S U S T A I N A B I L I T Y I N T H E L A N D S C A P E - Green Streets • Curbside, flow-through rain gardens capture stormwater from Second Street, slow it down, filter it through vegetation, then allow a fraction of it to exit into the city’s storm drainage system • Planters designed to preserve existing street trees in order to maintain neighborhood feeling and scale • Rain garden plant selections thrive with periods of seasonal flooding and drought - Aquilegia formosa (Western Columbine) one of Mrs. Packard’s favorite flowers - Heuchera maxima (Island Alum Root) - Heuchera micrantha (Coral Bells) - Iris douglasiana (Pacific Coast Iris) - Juncus patens ‘Elk Blue’ (California Gray Rush) - Ribes viburnifolium (Evergreen Currant)
  13. 13. S U S T A I N A B I L I T Y I N T H E L A N D S C A P E - Green Streets • The entire site can manage 90% of annual rainfall on-site through a combination of: - rain gardens - vegetated swales - unlined retention basins - underground infiltration trenches
  14. 14. S U S T A I N A B I L I T Y I N T H E L A N D S C A P E - Water harvesting: cisterns • Two 10,000-gallon underground tanks capture rainwater from the roof • Cistern water is used to flush the building’s toilets and meets 90% of demand • Cistern water is also used for irrigation • The municipal water company supplies any additional water needs Diagram by Integral Group
  15. 15. E X T E R I O R S P A C E S - Detention Basin • Overflow from the cisterns goes to the detention basin • Water is held for up to 48 hours and allowed to absorb into the soil; excess then exits to the city’s storm drainage system • The detention basin is planted with plants that tolerate periods of drought and inundation
  16. 16. S U S T A I N A B I L I T Y I N T H E L A N D S C A P E - Native Plants • Native plants reflect the Packard Family’s values concerning conservation and sustainability • 90% of the plants used are native to California • Why plant native plants: - They provide valuable habitat for birds, insects, and bees, creating a miniature ecosystem on the Foundation campus - They thrive without fertilizers, pesticides, and herbicides, thus ensuring a flourishing ecosystem - They translate to an irrigation savings of 30%, based on plant choices alone, compared to a ‘traditional’ landscape
  17. 17. F O R M O R E I N F O R M A T I O N Visit the David and Lucile Packard Foundation website for more information about the LEED® Platinum and Net Zero Energy Building certified headquarters. View the list of plants used on the Foundation’s campus. Visit the Joni L. Janecki and Associates, Inc. website.

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