B E Aerospace case study - Oracle Primavera P6 Collaborate 14

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B E Aerospace case study - Oracle Primavera P6 Collaborate 14

  1. 1. REMINDER Check in on the COLLABORATE mobile app B/E Aerospace Case Study Prepared by: Christopher Stimpson Manager of Program Controls and Primavera Systems B/E Aerospace | Seating Products Group How we started and turned around our implementation of EPPM. Session ID#: 15432
  2. 2. Products & Services Commercial Aircraft Business Jet / General Aviation / VVIP Military / Defense Seating ● ● Galley Systems ● ● ● Lighting Systems ● ● Lavatories ● Water & Waste Systems ● ● Monuments & Structures ● Reconfiguration & Engineering ● Oxygen Systems ● ● ● Electronics ● ● Brazing ● ● De-Icing ● ● Value-Added Service Solutions ● ● ● Consumables & Fastener Distribution ● ● ● Leading manufacturer of aircraft cabin interior products for commercial, business jet and military aircraft Leading supplier of fasteners and consumables, and full service solutions provider for the aerospace industry 29 Countries on 6 Continents
  3. 3. Presenters ■ Christopher Stimpson ▪ Manager of Program Controls & Primavera Systems ▪ Over 15 years of project/program/portfolio controls experience ▪ Former Primavera implementer and consultant ■ Guy Tufte ▪ Primavera Application Owner – Application Support ▪ IT professional ▪ Program management background and experience ■ Andrea Vestal ▪ Program Controls Specialist ▪ Seven years with B/E Aerospace ▪ Background in Data Management
  4. 4. Objectives ■ Share key lessons learned from the initial implementation. ▪ How do we avoid these mistakes? ■ Share the importance of branding the solution in the right framework. ■ Share the methodology used by Seating Products Group to turn around their implementation to benefit the business.
  5. 5. The Beginning: Installing Primavera
  6. 6. Approach - Classic Software Implementation ■ Objective ▪ 3 Business Units and the Information Technology group ▪ Software and Functionality, not the PMO Processes ■ Assessment & Design ▪ Utilized a Single Methodology ■ Install & Test ▪ Software ONLY, Process Redesign not Considered ■ Training ▪ Strictly Software Use, not Business Processes Change ■ Go Live ▪ Phased, Site by Site
  7. 7. Expectations – Implement all Primavera Functionality ■ Full Implementation of P6 R6.0 ▪ P6 Professional — Resource Management — Custom/BU Specific Reporting ▪ P6 Web — Dashboards — Portfolios — Capacity Planning — Resource Utilization
  8. 8. Missed Opportunities – Failure to Identify and Involve the Following ■ Site Sponsors ■ Site Change Agents ▪ Change Champion ■ Site Implementation Managers ▪ Owns the Site Implementation’s Success ■ Site Core Teams ▪ System Design and Process Modification Definition ■ Site Super User / Trainers ▪ Source of Key Requirements ■ End Users Involvement ▪ Process and Functionality Development and Validation
  9. 9. Results – Inconsistent Results ■ Assessment & Design varied from Site to Site ■ Each Business Unit developed unique P6 PMO Business Processes ■ Varied Training ▪ Each site approached training uniquely ■ Go Live ▪ 2 Business Units deployed Pro ONLY ▪ None deployed P6 Web ▪ One business unit delayed deployment by ~1.5 year ▪ IT rejected solution
  10. 10. Course Correction: Do an Implementation Implementation concepts presented herein are based upon principles from Don Harrison, President and founder of IMA. www.imaworldwide.com
  11. 11. Installation vs. Implementation ■ Project Development ■ Assessment & Design ■ Install & Test ■ Training ■ Go Live ■ What? ■ When? ■ How Much? ■ Success is Target-Based ■ Human Development ■ Grow Competency ■ Coaching ■ Reinforcement ■ Retraining ■ ROI focused ■ Business Objective Met ■ Human Objective Met ■ Success is Human-Based Installation Implementation
  12. 12. Team Composition ■ Sponsor ■ Project Leader (Business) ■ Project Manager ■ Core Team ■ Functional SMEs ■ Trainers ■ Users ■ Sponsor ■ Change Agent (Business) ■ Implementation Manager ■ IT Project Manager ■ Core Team (Design Decisions) ■ Advisors (Litmus test for success) ■ Trainers ■ Users (Make or break for success) Installation Implementation
  13. 13. Assessment ■ Determine Business Needs ■ Determine Business Objectives ■ Define Features to Support Objectives ■ Define Who Does What ■ One-Way Approach ■ Determine Sponsorship ■ Build Change Agent Capacity ■ Evaluate Climate/Culture ■ Prioritize for Capacity to Change ■ Determine Change Approach ■ Develop User Readiness ■ Create Cultural Fit ■ Marketing and Communication Plan ■ Reinforcement Strategy Installation Implementation
  14. 14. Objectives Alignment ■ Features ■ Platform ■ Extensibility ■ Intuitive Navigation ■ User Friendly ■ Etc. ■ Strategic Improvement ▪ Helps accomplish core competency (I.E. EVA) ■ Business Process Support ▪ Least work for best value ■ Flexibility ▪ Tailored to specific use case ■ Achievable ▪ Can be completed in reasonable timeframe Installation Implementation
  15. 15. Road Map ■ Security Patches ■ Fix Packs ■ Next Release ■ Integrations ■ Process Maturity ■ Staged Cultural Development ■ Prioritized by Business Objective ■ Three-Year Plan ■ Maturity Gates ■ Cultural Enhancements ■ Reinforcement Development Installation Implementation
  16. 16. Implementation Plan ■ Acquire Hardware ■ Install Software ■ Configure ■ Testing ■ Training ■ Cut-Over ■ Support ■ Integrate Processes ■ Feedback from Users ■ Limit Ability to do Old Way ■ Define Business Objective to be Met ■ Define how Humans Will Meet Objective ■ Team Effort to Develop Solution ■ Focus on People Development Installation Implementation
  17. 17. Implementation Schedule ■ Setting schedule for full implementation is risky ▪ Can you force business change in attitudes, process, culture in that timeframe? ■ Prioritize objectives and select features to support ▪ Focusing on the first building blocks of success then improving will yield better results. ▪ I.E. Scheduling before Resource Management. Both before Earned Value. ■ Trim the Fat ▪ Eye candy is nice. But, is it necessary for success? ■ Six Month Development Cycle ■ Six Month Absorption Cycle
  18. 18. Branding and Marketing ■ What are you doing? ■ Does everyone know and understand? ■ Why are you doing it? ■ How will everyone benefit? ■ What is the human value to this effort? ■ What is the progress of the change? ■ When will I be impacted by the change? ■ How will I be impacted by the change? ■ What were the results of the change? What value did I provide/get from participating in the change? ■ What’s next? REGULAR COMMUNICATION PREVENTS ALIENATION
  19. 19. Measuring Adoption ■ Complaint Count ■ Attitude Improvement ■ Time saved ■ Report Quality ■ Data Accuracy ■ Requests for Analysis/Reports ■ Confidence in Process ■ Confidence in System
  20. 20. Improving Adoption ■ System issues first ▪ System complaints are cheap to fix – human emotions are not. ■ Process issues first ▪ Processes may not have been properly integrated – fix them now or human emotions and culture will prevent future success. ■ Cultural influencers second ▪ People can and will talk. All the counter-talk will not work without having proof of the first two items above. ■ Be patient always ▪ Change takes time. ▪ Rushing and forcing only sours the culture. ■ Overcome social perceptions by observing and listening ▪ People respond well to active listeners.
  21. 21. Easy Mistakes ■ Doing too much at one time. ▪ Match priorities to business needs and capacity to change. ■ Defining answer without participation from business. ▪ Help them discover the same answer by their own conclusion. ■ Mandating change without sharing vision. ▪ Help them see and feel value in what they do by sharing results. ■ Design without involvement. ▪ Allow Users/Advisors to influence outcomes for increased adoption. ■ Lack of clear and authoritative sponsorship. ▪ Build sponsorship, help them communicate and reinforce. ■ Calling yourselves the Primavera Team ▪ Now you are affiliated with a product, not a process or competency.
  22. 22. Some of our recent and current Implementation Cycles
  23. 23. Report Quality ■ Reports had missing activities and were difficult to maintain ■ Establish use of standardized project and activity codes PROBLEM: SOLUTION:
  24. 24. Timesheet Accuracy ■ Too many activities for tracking time, which resulted in users not recording time accurately ■ Revise WBS and task list, providing a standardized group of time tracking activities PROBLEM: SOLUTION:
  25. 25. Web Delivery vs. Client ■ Open user access led to the perception that data was “always out of date”, due to misunderstanding of data date use ■ Centralize data management to program controls team ■ Provide users with schedule reports in various formats PROBLEM: SOLUTION:
  26. 26. Schedule Update Process ■ Schedule update process was time consuming and spanned 3 days out of the week. ■ Schedule update meetings lacked substantive review ■ Standardized update collection format OUTSIDE of a meeting, which allowed updates to be completed in single day ■ Schedule update meetings now focus on issue resolution, rather than date gathering PROBLEM: SOLUTION:
  27. 27. Schedule Development Process ■ Lacked standardized program schedule initiation, resulting in program schedules with too much and/or unusable data ■ Standardize schedule templates and incorporate variables into schedule templates ■ Create combined reports using BI Publisher PROBLEM: SOLUTION:
  28. 28. Schedule Development Process cont…
  29. 29. Earned Value Currently in Progress ■ Method for producing Earned Value metrics were highly desired, but largely misunderstood and feared, leading to contention ■ Rebrand to a different name – Resource Planning & Capacity ■ Refocus metric to meaningful applications ■ Focus on immediate business need ■ One bite at a time ■ Basics first ■ Build on next element when absorption is complete Problem: Solution:
  30. 30. Earned Value cont…
  31. 31. Current State: Where We Are Today
  32. 32. Then and Now ■ Lack of ownership ■ Disorganization/Confusion ■ Poor data integrity ■ Stakeholders created their own tracking methods to avoid using Primavera ■ Finger Pointing: “the blame game” ■ Processes and Procedures ■ Metrics ■ Data Integrity ■ Stakeholders have trust in the data the group provides ■ Program Controls works as a cohesive unit ■ Continuous Professional Development ■ Lower attrition Then: Now:
  33. 33. Key Elements to Success ■ Communication ■ Leadership implementation of industry best practices ■ Clear definition of what the stakeholder wants/needs from Primavera ▪ Each person is a customer of Program Controls ■ Processes and Procedures ■ Data Validation ■ Continuous Improvement ■ Training, Training, Training
  34. 34. Thank you for your participation. Please reach out if you have questions. christopher_stimpson@beaerospace.com guy_tufte@beaerospace.com andrea_vestal@beaerospace.com
  35. 35. Please complete the session evaluation We appreciate your feedback and insight You may complete the session evaluation either on paper or online via the mobile app

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