INTERPOL and Environmental Crimes

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  • <click 1> INTERPOL’s mission is to assist member countries in the effective enforcement of national and international environmental laws and treaties. Through this we can contribute to the ongoing conservation of the world’s environment, biodiversity and natural resources.
  • All activities are externally funding, since Environmental Crime has not been selected as an INTERPOL priority crime area. INTERPOL has therefore traditionally focused mostly on Wildlife and Pollution Crime. Since 2008 all activities have been organized under one Environmental Crime Programme, which is slowly being enabled to explore also other types of environmental crime, thanks to annual contributions of member states such as Canada, US, UK and the Netherlands.
  • Ecomessages are : <click 1> Speedy & methodical tool for the entry of a case in the report's details <click 2> Format is compatible with the Interpol database <click 3> Efficient cross-referencing of data <click 4> Organized and meaningful extraction of data <click 5> Facilitates applications such as criminal analysis. A specific challenge for international SECURE exchange of Environmental Intelligence : It is often not generated by Police but by dedicated government environmental enforcement agencies. The next slide gives an example of how it could work in your country
  • To engage in any of the areas of focus, appropriate process management is needed. In its efforts to become more institutionalized in the INTERPOL organization and to serve all of our customers on any environmental crime subject, the Environmental Crime Programme is now organizing its activities in a process oriented manner, rather than a thematic manner. 4 processes are recognized that interlink in a cyclic way: <click 1> Capacity process (training and dissemination of good practices leading to enhanced performance in member countries, including information sharing) <click 2> Intelligence process (enhancing, analyzing and transmitting intelligence to member countries and leading to operation proposals for joint action) <click 3> Operational process (evoking and coordinating joint operations, with as a result operational success, new intelligence, good practices and lessons learned) <click 4> Advocacy process (communicating successes, creating new partnerships for cooperation and funding, enhancing commitment to and active participation in training, intelligence and operations among member countries) <Click 5> The ambition is to create a structure that provides dedicated teams for this process oriented approach under one single coordination.
  • INTERPOL National Central Bureaus (NCBs) Each INTERPOL member country maintains a National Central Bureau (NCB) staffed by national law enforcement officers. The NCB is the designated contact point for the General Secretariat, regional offices and other member countries requiring assistance with overseas investigations and the location and apprehension of fugitives. It is also the gateway to police information and co-operation between the national police organization and their foreign counterparts. The role of an NCB is to participate in all of INTERPOL’s activities, providing constant and active co-operation – compatible with the laws of their countries – so that INTERPOL can achieve its aims. The NCB is typically one division of a member country’s national police agency or investigation service, or is under the jurisdiction of the ministry or department in charge of public security or justice. The head of the NCB is usually one of the highest-ranking law enforcement officials in the country. Depending on the country’s size, the NCB may have only two or three officers responsible for all INTERPOL-related activities, or several tens of officers, with specialists in terrorism, fugitives, high-tech crimes, or trafficking in human beings, drugs or stolen property. Larger NCBs may have their own legal counsel or crisis management centres to handle urgent requests from other countries. Officers working in the NCBs carry out their daily work in the pursuit of international police co-operation but remain employed by their national administrations.
  • INTERPOL National Central Bureaus (NCBs) Each INTERPOL member country maintains a National Central Bureau (NCB) staffed by national law enforcement officers. The NCB is the designated contact point for the General Secretariat, regional offices and other member countries requiring assistance with overseas investigations and the location and apprehension of fugitives. It is also the gateway to police information and co-operation between the national police organization and their foreign counterparts. The role of an NCB is to participate in all of INTERPOL’s activities, providing constant and active co-operation – compatible with the laws of their countries – so that INTERPOL can achieve its aims. The NCB is typically one division of a member country’s national police agency or investigation service, or is under the jurisdiction of the ministry or department in charge of public security or justice. The head of the NCB is usually one of the highest-ranking law enforcement officials in the country. Depending on the country’s size, the NCB may have only two or three officers responsible for all INTERPOL-related activities, or several tens of officers, with specialists in terrorism, fugitives, high-tech crimes, or trafficking in human beings, drugs or stolen property. Larger NCBs may have their own legal counsel or crisis management centres to handle urgent requests from other countries. Officers working in the NCBs carry out their daily work in the pursuit of international police co-operation but remain employed by their national administrations.
  • Ecomessages are : Speedy & methodical entry report's details Format is compatible with the Interpol database Efficient cross-referencing of data Organized and meaningful extraction of data Facilitates applications such as criminal analysis. A specific challenge for international SECURE exchange of Environmental Intelligence : It is often not generated by Police but by dedicated government agenies. The next slide gives an example of how it could work in your country
  • (click-sequence for this and next slide) <click 1> Transmitting Environmental Intelligence with the help of Ecomessages through I-24/7 no different from transmitting any other type information between NCB’s and IPSG. <click 2> The source and the destination of Environmental Intelligence is however often not a police agency but another designated authority with investigative powers, such as Environmental Inspectorates and Wildlife authorities. To create a secure link and agreed standard operating procedure between the NCB and the different Environmental Law Enforcement Agencies is therefore of the essence! <click 3> next slide
  • An example is given of transmitting Environmental Intelligence between the Dutch National Environmental Inspectorate and the Environmental Agency of the United Kingdom. The NCB’s in this country are hosted by the Netherlands Police Agency and the UK Serious Organised Crime Agency respectively <click 1> The communication between these NCB’s and the Environmental Crime Programme at INTERPOL General Secretariat goes through I-24/7in accordance with normal standard protocol. <click 2> The relevant Environmental Agencies are not directly connected to I-24/7 in these countries. However a secure governmental connection is in place between the NCB’s and the agencies. All that is needed therefore, is to make sure that the NCB’s know who and how to contact the Intelligence departments of these agencies and vice versa. <click 3> In this example to Dutch Environmental Inspectorate whishes to share Intelligence with the Environment Agency in the UK and wishes this information also to be accessible to other member countries through eASF. The Intelligence department inserts the information therefore in an Ecomessage template and sends it in a secure national manner to the NCB THE HAGUE at the Netherlands Police Agency <click 4> The Dutch NCB incorporates the Ecomessage in an I-24/7 message and sends it to the NCB LONDON at SOCA, in CC to IPSG at the attention of the Environmental Crime Programme. <click 5> NCB London then sends the Ecomessage in a secure national manner to the intelligence department of the UK Environment Agency. <click 6> This may seem rather complicated, but experience has shown that once the NCB’s and their national environmental counterparts have met and agreed on the SOP, the process becomes very efficient and more or less automatically. <click 10>
  • <click 1> Goal 1: To enhance and develop the capacity, capabilities and co-operation of member countries in the effective enforcement of their respective environmental laws <click 2> Goal 2: To encourage and assist in the exchange of environmental crime related information and intelligence between member countries <click 3> Goal 3: To provide operational support to member countries enforcing environmental laws <click 4> Goal 4: To encourage and provide opportunities to member countries to network, communicate and exchange skills with respect to the enforcement of environmental crime
  • <click 1> INTERPOL’s mission is to assist member countries in the effective enforcement of national and international environmental laws and treaties. Through this we can contribute to the ongoing conservation of the world’s environment, biodiversity and natural resources.
  • <click 1> INTERPOL’s mission is to assist member countries in the effective enforcement of national and international environmental laws and treaties. Through this we can contribute to the ongoing conservation of the world’s environment, biodiversity and natural resources.
  • INTERPOL and Environmental Crimes

    1. 2. MISSION <ul><li>Assist members countries </li></ul>in effective enforcement of (inter)national environmental laws & treaties. <ul><li>Assist ALL LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCIES ! </li></ul>
    2. 3. ENVIRONMENTAL CRIME FOCUS INCLUDES <ul><li>BIODIVERSITY: </li></ul><ul><li>NATURAL RESOURCES: </li></ul>ILLEGAL TRADE IN ENDANGERED SPECIES OVER EXPLOITATION OF FISHING GROUNDS ILLEGAL LOGGING MISUSE OF PROTECTED AREAS POLLUTION OF AIR, WATER AND SOIL ILLEGAL EXPLOITATION
    3. 4. INTERPOL FIGHTS ENVIRONMENTAL CRIME BY: <ul><li>Linking: 188 countries in a secure network </li></ul><ul><li>Gathering: intelligence in global nominal databases </li></ul><ul><li>Sharing: nominal data and best practices </li></ul><ul><li>Analyzing: criminal intelligence worldwide </li></ul><ul><li>Supporting: investigative requests </li></ul><ul><li>Initiating: international joint operations </li></ul><ul><li>Educating: through manuals, trainings, projects </li></ul>
    4. 5. Process oriented approach Coordination Operations Intelligence Capacity Advocacy
    5. 6. INTELLIGENCE SERVICES <ul><li>Transmitting Information </li></ul><ul><li>Storing Information </li></ul><ul><li>Analyzing Information </li></ul><ul><li>Sharing Information </li></ul>
    6. 7. INTERPOL National Central Bureau’s In each member country ! Hosted by the national administration
    7. 8. The INTERPOL gobal secure network I-24/7 connects law enforcers in 188 member countries
    8. 9. Airports Police regions Ports I-24/7 extension beyond NCB is encouraged Border crossings General Secretariat Non-police Enforcement Agencies National Central Bureau’s
    9. 10. Criteria for transmitting <ul><li>Accuracy of the information </li></ul><ul><li>Seriousness of the “offence” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>for environment: low treshhold, so incl violations and relevant compliance monitoring information </li></ul></ul><ul><li>“ International nature of the information” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>‘ Nature’ = Relevance! </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Not necessary an international case! </li></ul></ul>
    10. 11. Criteria for transmitting <ul><li>Foremost art 2 & 2b: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ (…)contribute effectively to the prevention and suppression of ordinary-law crimes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ (…) any information pertaining to constituent elements of ordinary-law crimes” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>‘ Ordinary-law crimes’ = Any (inter)national environmental treaty, law or regulation </li></ul></ul>
    11. 12. Accuracy of the information <ul><li>The nature of the offence is clearly stated </li></ul><ul><li>The date of the offence is given </li></ul><ul><li>The where the offence took place is clearly stated </li></ul><ul><li>Clear details of the offence are given (i.e. nominals) </li></ul><ul><li>Solution: ECOMESSAGE ! </li></ul>
    12. 13. INTERPOL ECOMESSAGES <ul><li>Dedicated format Environmental Enforcement Information </li></ul><ul><li>Speedy & methodical entry of report's details </li></ul><ul><li>Format compatible with INTERPOL database object ‘Environmental Incident’ </li></ul><ul><li>Allows efficient cross-referencing over all INTERPOL data </li></ul><ul><li>Organized and meaningful extraction of data </li></ul><ul><li>Facilitates applications such as criminal analysis. </li></ul>
    13. 14. Ecomessage up close <ul><li>Data Fields </li></ul><ul><li>Transmitting Ecomessages: </li></ul><ul><li>Environmental Enforcement often outside traditional police </li></ul><ul><li>Connection to INTERPOL National Central Bureau is crucial </li></ul><ul><li>All it takes is to get connected once… </li></ul>
    14. 15. National Central Bureau National Central Bureau Non-police Enforcement Agencies Non-police Enforcement Agencies Transmitting Eco-messages: cooperation
    15. 16. Transmitting Eco-messages: Example I24/7
    16. 17. Quarterly Intelligence Report 2011 - 1 <ul><li>Process performance monitor </li></ul><ul><li>Baseline period 2006-2010 </li></ul><ul><li>Recently sent to all 188 NCB’s </li></ul><ul><li>Available to all law enforcement officials </li></ul>
    17. 18. QUARTERLY REPORT 1 -2011 <ul><li>Awareness campaign: Strong increase in sharing </li></ul><ul><li>Dedicated processing capacity: dramatic increase structured intelligence for: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>cross-referencing in member countries </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>analysis </li></ul></ul><ul><li>INTERPOL Notices more than tripled </li></ul>
    18. 19. QUARTERLY REPORT 1 -2011 [1] If a possible alias is unconfirmed it will be entered as a new EP rather than added as an alias to the existing EP [2] A transmission related to one case may result in the recording of multiple Environmental Incidents, sometimes involving the same persons and items 52 (18%) 23 (44%) of which reported in Ecomessage format: 341 7 Entity Companies (EC) 312 65 Enivronmental Items 295 51 Environmental Incidents [2] (EI) 332 45 Entity Persons [1] (EP) Q1 BL Q1 BL Entities, Incidents, items (number) per quarter
    19. 20. “ FOR INTELLIGENCE PURPOSE ONLY “ <ul><li>Sharing ‘police-police’ information </li></ul><ul><li>Seldom mutual legal assistance required </li></ul><ul><li>Enhances efficient enforcement </li></ul><ul><li>Enhances effective investigation </li></ul><ul><li>Legal Assistance when needed for prosecution </li></ul>
    20. 21. Get involved ! We have a shared responsibility and we need your support !  <ul><li>Contact your INTERPOL National Central Bureau </li></ul><ul><li>Discuss how environmental crime is enforced in your country </li></ul><ul><li>Ask them how you can best be of service to each other to strengthen the judiciary system in environmental law enforcement </li></ul><ul><li>Share your ideas and best practice with us and the world </li></ul><ul><li>Help us build a solid network! </li></ul>
    21. 22. Gain access to our restricted website at www.interpol.int Subscribe to our newsletter through [email_address] We are involved ! We feel a shared responsibility and we offer you support !  
    22. 23. Questions & Feedback

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