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2015 DATOS AZ OYE! Intelligence Education & Entertainment Report

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For 19 years, the Arizona Hispanic Chamber’s DATOS: The State of the Hispanic Market report has been tracking, measuring and analyzing the ongoing economic, political and cultural transformation being driven by the state’s fast-growing Hispanic population. This year’s DATOS report is focused on education and as such OYE! endeavored to provide insights from both national and regional Latinos on their thoughts about this important topic.

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2015 DATOS AZ OYE! Intelligence Education & Entertainment Report

  1. 1. PRESENTING SPONSOR 2015
  2. 2. T H E S T A T E O F A R I Z O N A ’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T D A T O S A Z 2 0 1 5 1 Arizona’s Latino population has nearly tripled in the past 25 years to just over 2 million people, and experts say it could double again by the end of the next generation. Not since the advent of the railroad and the arrival of a wave of white settlers into the Arizona territory in the late 1800s has the state undergone such a far-reaching demographic and cultural transformation. For the past 19 years, the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce has been documenting this historic societal shift in our state and the growing economic influence of the Arizona’s Latino community in a comprehensive report called DATOS: The State of the Hispanic Market. In this year’s report, we show that the state’s Hispanic consumers will spend about $40.3 billion on goods and services in 2015, while Hispanic purchasing power nationwide could top $1.5 trillion—a figure roughly equivalent to the GDP of Australia. Interestingly, a recent study published by the Cervantes Institute found the United States is now home to 52 million Spanish speakers, more than any other country on earth except Mexico. Spanish is now the second most spoken language next to English in all but six states. As Arizona’s economic engine starts to rev up again, Hispanic-owned firms are poised to play a critical role in expanding our state’s increasingly diverse business environment. Consider that from 2007 to 2012, according to a recent U.S. Census report, Hispanic-owned businesses overall grew an astonishing 70 percent from 52,667 to 89,673, while going from just about 10 percent of all businesses in Arizona to more than 17 percent. Perhaps even more impres- sive, Census data shows that companies owned by Hispanic women skyrocketed by 116 percent from 19,367 in 2007 to 41,843 firms in 2012. By comparison, during that same period, the total number of all businesses statewide grew barely 2 percent from 491,529 to 499,927 companies. DATOS also forecasts that based on the compounded annual growth rate of Hispanic-owned businesses statewide from 2007 and 2012, Arizona is now home to an estimated 123,406 Hispanic companies overall, a majority of which (66,429 businesses, or 54 percent) are owned by Hispanic women. On behalf of the entire Chamber Board and its staff, we congratulate Arizona Latina entrepreneurs like our very own Lorena Valencia of Reliance Wire and Cable, Lisa Urias of Urias Communications, Cathy Garcia of Cha Cha Chic and the estimated 66,000-plus other Latinas across the state who are leading the way in Hispanic business growth. The DATOS report was created to serve as a comprehensive and reliable source of fact-based information about the state’s Hispanic market that could be utilized by not only Arizona Hispanics but all public and private industry officials tasked with crafting our state’s economic agenda—an agenda that must include the state’s Latino community. Why do we do it? Because the Arizona Hispanic Chamber knows that while it’s important to talk about the intrinsic value of an inclusive society, it is imperative that we make that argument grounded in the type of well-researched data we proudly bring to you every year in DATOS. In addition to DATOS, the Arizona Hispanic Chamber invites you to attend our Fourth Annual Business Diversity Summit on November 13, 2015, where we will gather business leaders to discuss the intersection between a strong environment and vibrant economy. On December 4, 2015, the Chamber will again partner with Hensley Beverage Company and ASU’s Hispanic Business Alumni Association to host the 24th Annual Bud Shoot- out. Tournament proceeds go to help fund our college scholarship program aimed at growing the pool of young business and STEM graduates. The Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce is committed through our nearly 60 annual events to serve as the state’s leading advocate for Hispanic consumers and business owners, all as part of a wider effort to promote Arizona’s economic development and global competitiveness. Respectfully, “SRP is proud to sponsor the release of the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce’s 19th Annual DATOS: State of Arizona’s Hispanic Market because we believe all Arizonans should know that our state’s future economic vibrancy and prosperity is inextricably linked to the growing influence and buying power of its diverse and burgeoning Hispanic population.” —Mark Bonsall, General Manager & CEO, SRP WELCOME TO DATOS 2015 The Growing Economic Influence Of Arizona Latinos Gonzalo A. de la Melena, Jr. President & CEO Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Yolanda France Director, Customer Contact Operations Salt River Project (SRP) AZHCC Board of Directors
  3. 3. T H E S T A T E O F A R I Z O N A ’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T D A T O S A Z 2 0 1 5 3 DATOS 2015 CONTENT COMMITTEE (Listed in alphabetical order of Company/Organization) Christina Tellez AAA ARIZONA Kenny Farrell ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS Dr. Alfredo G. de los Santos, Jr. ARIZONA MINORITY EDUCATION POLICY ANALYSIS CENTER Andrea Whitsett ASU, MORRISON SCHOOL FOR PUBLIC POLICY Melissa Gamez ASU, SEIDMAN RESEARCH INSTITUTE Dr. Bert Valencia ASU, THUNDERBIRD SCHOOL OF GLOBAL MANAGEMENT Gonzalo A. de la Melena, Jr. AZHCC James E. Garcia AZHCC Monica S. Villalobos AZHCC Catherin Vargas BLUE CROSS BLUE SHIELD OF ARIZONA Marla Bauer BLUE CROSS BLUE SHIELD OF ARIZONA Marjorie DeRubeis COLLEGE SUCCESS ARIZONA Edyta Koscielniak COX COMMUNICATIONS Victor Holland GEOSCAPE Laura Fullington MACERICH Alana Chavez Langdon MARICOPA ASSOCIATION OF GOVERNMENTS Kerry Mitchell MARICOPA COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICT Ruth Soberanes NORTH AMERICAN RESEARCH PARTNERSHIP Greg Fresquez PHOENIX INTERNATIONAL RACEWAY Michele Valdovinos REPUBLIC MEDIA Yolanda France SALT RIVER PROJECT (SRP) Dr. Raquel Gutierrez ST. LUKE’S HEALTH INITIATIVES Dr. Maria R. Chavira THE ROMAN CATHOLIC DIOCESE OF PHOENIX Jaime Boyd UNIVISION Kevin Norgaard UNIVISION Jorge Luna VALLEY METRO Anel Mercado VALLEY OF THE SUN UNITED WAY Luis R. Soto VANTAGE WEST CREDIT UNION Glenn Iwata WESTGROUP RESEARCH Monica S. Villalobos Editor James E. Garcia Associate Editor Karen Murphy Copy Editor/Proofreader Lisa Martinez Lopez Intern, Executive Services Carmen G. Martínez Creative Director Miguel Angel Lopez Gonzalez Research Analyst Aurelio Herrera Intern, Research Eric Rascon Intern, Business Development ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY STUDENT TEAM RESEARCH PROFESSOR Dr. Loui Olivas Director STUDENT RESEARCHERS Adriana Grado Graduated, Spring 2015 Gilberto Lopez Graduated, Spring 2015 Deidre Zuniga Graduated, Spring 2015 Carolina Aguirre Management Major Felipe Corral Marketing Major Axel Martinez Business Communications Major Flor Uribe Accounting Major PRODUCTION TEAM In DATOS 2015, the terms Hispanic and Latino are used synonymously, as are Native American and American Indian and African-American and black. White, Non- Hispanic is sometimes referred to as Non-Hispanic white. Hispanics may be of any race. The information presented here was selected from standard secondary sources. However, data changes quickly and is not always collected annually. Data often offers a static picture of an ever-changing situation. The numbers calculated for any statistic depend on the defi- nitions and assumptions used to produce them. TERMINOLOGY AND RESEARCH ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 2015
  4. 4. FEATURED CLIENTS ENJOYING THE SOCIAL MEDIA DATA ON THIS REPORT? WE LOVED PULLING IT. OYE! CREATES ACTIONABLE HISPANIC MARKET INSIGHTS FOR FORTUNE 500 FIRMS NATIONWIDE. LEARN HOW OYE! LEADS THE INDUSTRY IN HISPANIC ONLINE RESEARCH. OYEINTELLIGENCE.COM/DATOS OUR FUTURES ARE ALL CONNEC+ED valleymetro.org/connected Did you know that 35% of rail passengers choose to ride instead of drive, removing over 10,000 cars from the road?
  5. 5. T H E S T A T E O F A R I Z O N A ’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T D A T O S A Z 2 0 1 5 52 CONSUMER BEHAVIOR CHAPTER 2 CONSUMERSECTION I Hispanic Entertainment Insights ABOUT OYE! OYE! is a tool designed to bring a deeper understanding of the Hispanic consumer to brands through analysis of social conversation. OYE! not only identifies U.S. Hispanic conver- sation, but also analyzes the discussion based in Spanish, English or Spanglish. OYE! then derives meaning from that conversation to deliver insights on overall Hispanic use of social media as well as insights into Hispanic demograph- ics and psychographics. DATA GATHERED OYE! is a social data analysis tool. Samples of conversa- tion on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram are pulled accord- ing to the privacy and security settings on those platforms. The data reviewed is both independently generated user content as well as comments about and replies to brand/ organization content. A large sample size of data is pulled from the full universe of data available to provide statisti- cally relevant samples of the conversation. IDENTIFYING HISPANICS While the use of the Spanish language in social media is a significant indicator that someone may be Hispanic, it is not the only identifier. Other factors are leveraged to iden- tify Hispanics: name, images, location, following (who they follow as well as who follows them) all contribute to clas- sifying a social profile as Hispanic. OYE! has created a proprietary technology to analyze and weight these factors to determine the likelihood the creator of a given piece of content is Hispanic. CONFIDENTIALITY OYE! leverages data that is available publicly either via purchase from 3rd party vendors and/or directly from the social platforms. OYE! does not violate any individual user’s privacy at the time of data collection. All conclusions about any individual’s race, gender, language preferences, etc. is kept secure and is not shared with any 3rd party or client. SAMPLE SIZE This report covers over 17,000 verified Hispanic conver- sations about the topics of favorite actors/actresses, mov- ies, video games, cable networks and more engaged with among the Hispanic community. A sample of general mar- ket conversations was analyzed as well to provide compari- sons between ethnicity. All data was pulled between June 15th –and July 15th of 2015. SUMMARY In the entertainment industry Hispanics were found to talk about Latino musicians such as Selena Gomez who owned 29% of the total Hispanic conversation among other artists such as Pitbull and Romeo Santos. Netflix and SoundCloud dominated Hispanic mentions in their respective industries of streaming video and audio. Nintendo, with high affin- ity for the Mario Bros franchise, dominated video game console conversation while Call of Duty was the individual game most discussed by the Hispanic audience. The importance of the Hispanic moviegoer is an often mentioned theme and Minions was found to be the most popular movie, pushing 43% of the total movie conversa- tion when evaluating the top 10 movies in theaters from June 15-July 15. ALL FINDINGS 1. Selena Gomez was the most mentioned artist among Hispanics with 29% of the total conversa- tion. 14% of the time fans expressed their admira- tion for her, mentioning their “love” for her. Men- tions of Selena’s new song, “Good for You” drove 10% of total conversation. A final driver noticed was mentions of her recent Pantene sponsorship which drove 3% of the conversation.
  6. 6. T H E S T A T E O F A R I Z O N A ’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T D A T O S A Z 2 0 1 5 53 CONSUMER BEHAVIOR CHAPTER 2 CONSUMERSECTION I Hispanic Entertainment Insights 2. Netflix was by far the Hispanic favorite as it was the most mentioned online movie platform with 97% of the conversation. Their hit series, “Orange is the New Black” pushed over 40% of the conversation. Mentions of the movie Daredevil (5%) helped drive conversation as well. Platforms Hulu and HBO Go were not mentioned nearly as much by Hispanics making up 3% of the conversation. 3. Nintendo was the most mentioned game console with 61% of the conversation. Games associated with the Mario Brothers franchise propelled over 18% of Nintendo conversation. Smash Brothers was the next highest driver for Nintendo, owning 15% of that brand’s conversation. Additionally, the NES and WII systems helped inspire 11% and 10% of posts respectively. Xbox was the next high- est discussed console with 21% of the conversation but was highly varied in topics. The most discussed category among Hispanics was the game Elder Scrolls, driving 3% of Xbox conversation. Finally, PlayStation owned 18% of total conversation with mentions of the video game conference E3 power- ing 25% of this brand’s conversation. 4. Univision was the TV channel driving the highest conversation volume among Hispanics. The novela, “Lo Imperdonable” drove the highest quantity of mentions with 32% of the Univision conversation. Mentions of the hashtag, “Growing up Hispanic” also drove 11% of the Univision volume. 5. SoundCloud (47%) was mentioned the most over iHeartradio (34%) and Spotify (19%). Sound Cloud appears to be a popular music platform for Hispanics as they can create, upload, and share their music themselves. Conversation was very dis- persed among users, the biggest topic found was self-promotion of the song “Pour it Up” from a user, Narada Vanegas with 4% of the conversation. 6. The movie Minions drove the most mentions with 43% of the total conversation when evaluating the top 10 movies in theaters from June 15-July 15. On average 9% of movie conversation was confirmed to be from Hispanics while Minions over-indexed with the Latino audience gaining 12% from this demographic. The movie, The Gallows also over indexed with Hispanic mentions making up 10% of its total conversation. The majority of Minions posts were from users expressing their desire to see the movie. 7. The Call of Duty video game was the most men- tioned game with 30% of the Hispanic total conver- sation, 28% of the Call of Duty conversation was sparked by the version Black Ops III, Hispanics also mentioned the version Advance Warfare 6% of the time. 8. When comparing mentions of ‘favorite actors’ among top entertainers both Hispanic and non- Hispanic, actor Adam Sandler drove 14% of total conversation from Non-Hispanics and 7% from His- panics. 51% of Non-Hispanic conversation were shares/retweets about Adam Sandler meeting a cancer patient from Australia while 21% of Hispan- ics mentioned the same conversation. 9. Actress, Scarlet Gruber (Venezuelan) was the most mentioned among Hispanics with 44% of the His- panic conversation. The largest segment of the Hispanic conversation came from a desperate (yet passionate) fan in Dallas, TX posting over 200 Tweets tagging the actress, asking her to follow her account. 10. The TV channel, BET had mentions that were 3% Hispanic and 97% were non-Hispanic. The BET awards were the highest driver for both Hispanics (84%) and for Non-Hispanics (65%).
  7. 7. T H E S T A T E O F A R I Z O N A ’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T D A T O S A Z 2 0 1 5 54 CONSUMER BEHAVIOR CHAPTER 2 CONSUMERSECTION I Source: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 17,000 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations nationwide.  Top Online Music Platforms Mentioned by Hispanics June 15th – July 15th, 2015 47% 35% 19% SoundCloud iheartradio Spotify SoundCloud Was The Most Mentioned Online Music Platform By Hispanics Add OYE logoSource: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 17,000 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations nationwide. TOP ONLINE MUSIC PLATFORMS MENTIONED BY HISPANICS JUNE 15 – JULY 15, 2015 SoundCloud Was The Most Mentioned Online Music Platform By Hispanics Source: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 17,000 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations nationwide.  Top 5 Artists Mentioned by Hispanics June 15th-July 15th,2015 29% 27% 14% 8% 6% Selena Gomez Pitbull Romeo Santos Taylor Swift Ariana Grande Selena Gomez and Pitbull Were The Most Mentioned Artists Among Hispanics Driving Over Half The Total Conversation Add OYE logoSource: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 17,000 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations nationwide. TOP 5 ARTISTS MENTIONED BY HISPANICS JUNE 15 – JULY 15, 2015 Selena Gomez and Pitbull Were The Most Mentioned Artists Among Hispanics Driving Over Half The Total Conversation Courtesy of Courtesy of
  8. 8. T H E S T A T E O F A R I Z O N A ’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T D A T O S A Z 2 0 1 5 55 CONSUMER BEHAVIOR CHAPTER 2 CONSUMERSECTION I Source: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 17,000 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations nationwide.  Top Online Movie Platforms for Hispanics June 15th-July 15th, 2015 97% 3% 1% Netflix Hulu HBO GO Netflix Was By Far The Hispanic Favorite As It Was The Most Mentioned Online Movie Platform With 97% Of The Conversation Add OYE logoSource: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 17,000 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations nationwide. TOP ONLINE MOVIE PLATFORMS FOR HISPANICS JUNE 15 – JULY 15, 2015 Netflix Was By Far The Hispanic Favorite As It Was The Most Mentioned Online Movie Platform With 97% Of The Conversation Source: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 17,000 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations nationwide.  TV Channel BET – BET Awards by Race June 15th – July 15th, 2015 3% 97% BET Channel Hispanics Non-Hispanics 84% 65% Hispanic Non-Hispanic BET Awards By Race The BET Awards Were The Highest Driver For Both Hispanics (84%) And For Non-Hispanics (65%) Add OYE logoSource: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 17,000 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations nationwide. TV CHANNEL BET – BET AWARDS BY RACE JUNE 15 – JULY 15, 2015 The BET Awards Were The Highest Driver For Both Hispanics (84%) And For Non-Hispanics (65%) Courtesy of Courtesy of
  9. 9. T H E S T A T E O F A R I Z O N A ’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T D A T O S A Z 2 0 1 5 56 CONSUMER BEHAVIOR CHAPTER 2 CONSUMERSECTION I Source: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 17,000 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations nationwide.  Top Game Consoles Used by Hispanics June 15th-July 15th, 2015 61% 21% 18% Nintendo Xbox PlayStation Nintendo Was The Most Mentioned Game Console By Hispanics, Driving 61% Of The Conversation Add OYE logoSource: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 17,000 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations nationwide. TOP GAME CONSOLES USED BY HISPANICS JUNE 15 – JULY 15, 2015 Nintendo Was The Most Mentioned Game Console By Hispanics, Driving 61% Of The Conversation Source: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 17,000 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations nationwide.  TOP MOVIE MENTIONS – MINIONS MOVIE MENTIONS BY RACE JUNE 15 – JULY 15, 2015 Courtesy of Courtesy of The Movie ‘Minions’ Drove The Most Hispanic Mentions, Which Overall Accounted For 12% Of The Total Conversation Top Movie Mentions – Minions Movie June 15th – July 15th, 2 59% 10% 8% 6% 5% Minions Dope Max Inside out Amy 88% 12% Minions Non-Hispanics Hispanics The Movie Minions Drove The Most Hispanic Mentions, Overall Hispanic Mentions Of The Movie Minions Accounted For 12% Of Total Conversation ASource: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 17,000 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations nationwide.
  10. 10. T H E S T A T E O F A R I Z O N A ’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T D A T O S A Z 2 0 1 5 57 CONSUMER BEHAVIOR CHAPTER 2 CONSUMERSECTION I Source: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 17,000 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversa- tions nationwide.  Top Video Games Mentioned By Hispanics June 15th – July 15th, 2015 30% 28% 10% 9% 6% Call of Duty Halo Bungie Need For Speed Assassin's Creed The Call Of Duty Video Game Was The Most Mentioned Game With 30% Of The Hispanic Total Conversation Add OYE logoSource: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 17,000 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations nationwide. TOP VIDEO GAMES MENTIONED BY HISPANICS JUNE 15 – JULY 15, 2015 The Call Of Duty Video Game Was The Most Mentioned Game With 30% Of The Hispanic Total Conversation Courtesy of The law firm of Quarles & Brady is a proud sponsor of the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. For more information about our legal services, please contact Leonardo Loo at (602) 229-5638 or leonardo.loo@quarles.com. quarles.com
  11. 11. T H E S T A T E O F A R I Z O N A ’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T D A T O S A Z 2 0 1 5 88 CASE STUDYCONSUMER BEHAVIOR SECTION I MISSION In early 2015, OYE! Business Intelligence partnered with Fortune 100 financial institution MassMutual to compile 12 months of social media data from Hispanic consumers in the financial industry. The goal was to use this data to build the best strategy to reach the Hispanic community as well as bring more awareness of MassMutual’s extensive financial education efforts among their target market. The plan was to monitor publicly available online conversations via social media in order to listen to what Hispanics were saying about the brand as well as their competitors in the industry. APPROACH OYE! was used to closely monitor all relevant online conver- sations surrounding the MassMutual brand among Hispan- ics. Among other marketing data the OYE! solution tracked were the conversation drivers, volume, and sentiment of conversations. OYE! analyzed the conversations Hispanic consumers were already saying about the brand and helped MassMutual understand the different aspects of where their most useful audience segments are as well as to create cam- paigns tailored to the identified audience. A report was compiled to provide key insights to the MassMutual team on the Hispanic audience and was supported by recommenda- tions on ways to engage the consumers from OYE!. RESULTS Based on the marketing data insights and observations that were found during the online listening process, OYE! was able to make recommendations aimed at improving involve- ment between the online Hispanic community and the Mass- Mutual brand. By using OYE! insights on a monthly basis as part of their overall strategy, MassMutual has grown their en- gagement with the Hispanic community compared to 2014. Efforts that have driven high awareness throughout the year as reported by OYE! data include the launch of their Spanish website in March as well as their partnership with ALPFA in July. As of August 2015, MassMutual has experienced an upward trend in Hispanic online mentions with total conver- sation increasing month over month. Inspiring as well, are OYE!’s findings that positive sentiment has increased consis- tently for MassMutual, up to 60% in July of 2015. Overall, the Hispanic community has responded very well to Mass- Mutual’s continued efforts and the brand has achieved un- der 1% negative sentiment every month since measurement began in January 2014. Other valuable insights MassMutual learned through the data included: • The financial service industry’s top 5 brands that de- livered over 75% of share of voice among the US Hispanics in 2014 were New York Life, State Farm, Allstate, MetLife and Farmers. • Brands that appeared in the top 5 had dedicated campaigns directed at Hispanics such as Ritmo De Cambio from State Farm. • Hispanics tended to use Spanish more frequently when they generated their own social media con- tent than when responding to content published by brands or influencers in English. • Conversation spiked throughout the year around Hispanic Awareness Month and during campaigns designed to deliver Hispanic engagement such as partners with local causes and non-profits. • The 35-44 age group was the highest engaged group in the financial services industry. Although, male conversation was more prevalent at 56%, it was noted that in younger age groups, Hispanic women are more heavily engaged in the conversa- tion. MassMutual CHAPTER 3
  12. 12. T H E S T A T E O F A R I Z O N A ’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T D A T O S A Z 2 0 1 5 89 CASE STUDYCONSUMER BEHAVIOR SECTION I CHAPTER 3 PhotosCourtesyofOye! www.thenativa.com www.linkedin.com/in/ediaz33 MassMutual’s progress in the last three months in increasing Hispanic conversation. MassMutual above mentioning their activation with partner, ALPFA and their 2015 convention with Spanish postings. Through online listening, OYE! was able to identify agency superstars such as MassMutual South Texas in their post above supporting the Latina Leadership Institute through the San Antonio Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. MassMutual was able to drive Bilingual language for the month of July through their partnership with ALPFA. For more information, contact Eric Diaz, Nativa Multicultural Communications Co-owner and Co-Founder of OYE! Business Intelligence at 602-277-0224 MassMutual Case Study
  13. 13. T H E S T A T E O F A R I Z O N A ’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T D A T O S A Z 2 0 1 5 236 CHAPTER 8 EDUCATIONSECTION II CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS Hispanic Education Insights ABOUT OYE! OYE! is a tool designed to bring a deeper understanding of the Hispanic consumer to brands through analysis of social conversation. OYE! not only identifies U.S. Hispanic conver- sation, but also analyzes the discussion based in Spanish, English or Spanglish. OYE! then derives meaning from that conversation to deliver insights on overall Hispanic use of social media as well as insights into Hispanic demograph- ics and psychographics. DATA GATHERED OYE! is a social data analysis tool. Samples of conversa- tion on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram are pulled accord- ing to the privacy and security settings on those platforms. The data reviewed is both independently generated user content as well as comments about and replies to brand/ organization content. A large sample size of data is pulled from the full universe of data available to provide statisti- cally relevant samples of the conversation. IDENTIFYING HISPANICS While the use of the Spanish language in social media is a significant indicator that someone may be Hispanic, it is not the only identifier. Other factors are leveraged to iden- tify Hispanics: name, images, location, following (who they follow as well as who follows them) all contribute to clas- sifying a social profile as Hispanic. OYE! has created a proprietary technology to analyze and weight these factors to determine the likelihood the creator of a given piece of content is Hispanic. CONFIDENTIALITY OYE! leverages data that is available publicly either via purchase from 3rd party vendors and/or directly from the social platforms. OYE! does not violate any individual user’s privacy at the time of data collection. All conclusions about any individual’s race, gender, language preferences, etc. is kept secure and is not shared with any 3rd party or client. SAMPLE SIZE This report covers over 3,000 verified Hispanic conversa- tions about the topic of education stemming from Arizona (mentions of Arizona colleges and universities) and the Southwest (AZ, CA, CO, NM, NV, TX, and UT). A sample of 500 general market conversations were analyzed as well to provide comparisons between ethnicity. All data was pulled between June 15th –and July 15th of 2015. SUMMARY Latinos express themselves primarily in English (95% of edu- cation posts) but it is not hard to see their Latino heritage through their ability to switch back and forth between Eng- lish and Spanish showing off their Hispanic roots. The most popular topic found on this report was Graduation, likely due to the time span in which the data was analyzed. The topics of Major selection as well as Studying were the next most discussed. Instagram was the tool of choice for Hispanics on social media, with 89% of all mentions coming from this channel. Topics such as Graduation and Studying were quite popu- lar on this forum while choice of Major was a topic most often found on Twitter. ALL FINDINGS 1. The top 3 universities mentioned by Arizona His- panics were ASU (38%), UOP (16%) and UA (14%) with over 68% of the total conversation volume. 2. The topic of Graduation was the most discussed among Hispanics with 74% of all mentions and drove 59% positive sentiment. Non-Hispanics drew 70% positive sentiment for the same topic. Hispanics were found to be congratulating their family member or friend 78% of the time and ex- pressed how thankful they were themselves to be graduating 17% of the time. Non-Hispanics how- ever congratulated their friends/family 36% of the time and 48% were thankful for their own gradua- tion in their post. 3. Of the remaining topics not including Graduation, 47% of all Hispanic conversation in the Southwest pertained to Majors, with Engineering being the most discussed. Engineering mentions owned 54% of all Majors conversation. By contrast, only 28% of the general market conversation mentioned Majors, the largest driver being mentions of a Management degree (55%).
  14. 14. T H E S T A T E O F A R I Z O N A ’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T D A T O S A Z 2 0 1 5 237 CHAPTER 8 EDUCATIONSECTION II CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS Hispanic Education Insights 4. Specifically looking at Arizona mentions of ASU, Hispanic conversation about Majors was over 18% of total conversation. This compared to Non- Hispanics who mentioned Majors 17% of the time. Both were driven by mentions of the Communica- tions degree. 5. Hispanic education conversations in the Southwest region were mostly found to be in English, dominat- ing 95% of the total conversation. It was interest- ing to note that 4% of all mentions were Bilingual, meaning there was at least 1 word found in both Spanish and English in each post. The remaining 1% of education mentions were in Spanish. Arizo- na specifically had 93% conversation in English, 4% Bilingual and 2% in Spanish. 6. The top schools that drove Anticipation, or excite- ment for attending a certain school, among the Ari- zona Hispanic community were ASU with 52%, UA with 24% and 14% for UOP. Non-Hispanic men- tions of top schools that drove Anticipation men- tions were UA and NAU with 31% each, UOP with 23%, and 15% for ASU. Example posts: https://twitter.com/Rodrick- kJAbeyta/statuses/610921040835772416 https://twitter.com/B_raddeBorde/status- es/617157999912722432 7. Overall, Hispanic conversation in the Southwest had very little negative sentiment (3%), compared to 12% for Non-Hispanics. Specific to Arizona, ASU had 30% positive conversation with mentions of school experiences like joining Greek life and anticipation to attend the school. UOP drove the highest Hispanic negative sentiment with 47% and ASU delivered 11% negative sentiment, both most- ly influenced by mentions of negatives stereotypes the schools are associated with respectively. With Non-Hispanics, a similar trend occurred with UOP generating 47% negative mentions, and 7% nega- tive for ASU. 8. It was found that 5% of UA’s total conversation included mentions of UA creating a center for Mexican Studies in collaboration with The National Autonomous University of Mexico. There were no mentions of this topic from the general market. 9. Of Arizona conversation, Harvard was the top school mentioned outside of Arizona powered by an individual on Instagram posting multiple pic- tures showing his pride in attending the Ivy League school. https://instagram.com/p/4fn952ARse/ 10. A popular topic for Hispanics in the Southwest was mentions of transferring from a college to a univer- sity. 4% of all conversation (not counting gradua- tion) pertained to Transfers which was nearly identi- cal to general market mentions for the same topic. The top school for Hispanic transfer discussion was ASU (56%) while NAU was the most mentioned in the general market sample with over 90%. 11. The majority of Southwest Hispanic conversation came from Instagram with 89% of total volume from this channel. Driving mentions were Gradu- ation pictures (82% of Instagram). Twitter was the second leading channel with 8% of all mentions, led by discussion of Majors (24%). Finally, 3% of volume were Facebook postings driven by sharing Articles (24%) related to universities. 12. Bilingual mentions in the Southwest were mostly powered by Graduations, with that topic driving 89% of all Spanglish posts. These mentions most often contained an English statement, followed by numerous hashtags of which several were written in Spanish such as: #graduacion or #orgullo. Ex- ample: https://instagram.com/p/463F2Nho_N/ 13. For Hispanics in the Southwest, out of the top 10 posts with over 300 Likes, 9 of them pertained to Graduation. Only one discussed another topic, which was Studying. Graduation: https://instagram.com/ p/4CYCKIvGR0/ Studying: https://instagram.com/p/3-gvCdytVH/ 14. Student Loans made up just 2% of the total South- west Hispanic conversation (not counting Gradu- ation), 15% of that being positive sentiment in- fluenced by mentions by users of paying off their loans. Non-Hispanics mentioned Student Loans slightly more often with 3% of the total conversa- tion, 13% of that being positive sentiment mention- ing current news articles. 15. Hispanics in the Southwest were found to snap pho- tos to show off their study habits. Of these mentions, 5% of the time they were studying for exams. 10% of those mentions were Bilingual with hashtags such as #educatedlatina or #mujerconpoder. https:// instagram.com/p/5KWpH0QHap/
  15. 15. T H E S T A T E O F A R I Z O N A ’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T D A T O S A Z 2 0 1 5 238 CHAPTER 8 EDUCATIONSECTION II CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS Source: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 3,500 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations from Arizona (mentions of Arizona colleges and universities) and the Southwest (AZ, CA, CO, NM, NV, TX, and UT). Arizona State University Top 5 Drivers - Arizona Hispanics 17.24% 13.79% 8.28% 8.28% 6.21% Majors Transfers Articles Experience Scholarships 32% 17% 13% 10% 8% Articles Majors Admissions Jobs Profiles Arizona State University Top 5 Drivers – General Market Arizona State University Hispanics Top Conversation Driver Was About Majors At 17%, In Comparison To The General Market Top Conversation Driver Which Was About News Articles at 32% Arizona State University Hispanics Top Conversation Driver Was About Majors At 17%, In Comparison To The General Market Top Conversation Driver Which Was About News Articles at 32% Source: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 3,500 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations from Arizona (mentions of Arizona colleges and universities) and the Southwest (AZ, CA, CO, NM, NV, TX, and UT). Top 5 Universities Mentioned by Arizona Hispanics 38.1% 15.7% 14.4% 7.3% 7.1% 17.3% Arizona State University University of Phoenix University of Arizona Northern Arizona University Thunderbird Other Arizona State University Was The Highest Mentioned University In Social Media By Arizona Hispanics Source: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 3,500 social media mentions sample. TOP 5 UNIVERSITIES MENTIONED BY ARIZONA HISPANICS Arizona State University Was The Highest Mentioned University In Social Media By Arizona Hispanics Arizona State University Top 5 Drivers - Arizona Hispanics Arizona State University Top 5 Drivers – General Market Courtesy of Courtesy of
  16. 16. T H E S T A T E O F A R I Z O N A ’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T D A T O S A Z 2 0 1 5 239 CHAPTER 8 EDUCATIONSECTION II CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS Source: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 3,500 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations from Arizona (mentions of Arizona colleges and universities) and the Southwest (AZ, CA, CO, NM, NV, TX, and UT). Language Used In The Southwest Region By Hispanics To Discuss Education 94.8% 3.7% 1.6% English Spanglish Spanish %, Hispanic Education Conversations In The Southwest Region Were Found To Be In English LANGUAGE USED IN THE SOUTHWEST REGION BY HISPANICS TO DISCUSS EDUCATION Source: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 3,500 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations from Arizona (mentions of Arizona colleges and universities) and the Southwest (AZ, CA, CO, NM, NV, TX, and UT). 49.4% 18.6% 7.3% 5.8% 4.0% Engineering Biology Business Accounting Communications and Media 55.1% 8.8% 4.4% 4.4% 3.7% Management Communications Law American Indian Studies Business Major Top 5 Drivers – Southwest Hispanics Major Top 5 Drivers – Southwest General Market Engineering Was The Most Discussed Major By Hispanics In The Southwest, While Management Was The Most Discussed Major By The General Market Engineering Was The Most Discussed Major By Hispanics In The Southwest, While Management Was The Most Discussed Major By The General Market At Hispanic Education Conversations In The Southwest Region Were Found To Be In English 95% Major Top 5 Drivers – Southwest Hispanic Major Top 5 Drivers – Southwest General Market Courtesy of Courtesy of
  17. 17. T H E S T A T E O F A R I Z O N A ’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T D A T O S A Z 2 0 1 5 240 CHAPTER 8 EDUCATIONSECTION II CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS Source: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 3,500 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations from Arizona (mentions of Arizona colleges and universities) and the Southwest (AZ, CA, CO, NM, NV, TX, and UT). Top Schools That Drove Anticipation In Arizona 52.4% 23.8% 14.3% 4.8% 15.4% 30.8% 23.1% 30.8% Arizona State University University of Arizona University of Phoenix Northern Arizona University Hispanic General Market Over Half Of Arizona Hispanics University Anticipation Was Driven By Arizona State University, In Comparison To The General Market at 15% TOP SCHOOLS THAT DROVE ANTICIPATION IN ARIZONA Over Half Of Arizona Hispanics University Anticipation Was Driven By Arizona State University, In Comparison To The General Market at 15% Source: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 3,500 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations from Arizona (mentions of Arizona colleges and universities) and the Southwest (AZ, CA, CO, NM, NV, TX, and UT). 93.5% 4.3% 2.2% English Spanglish Spanish Arizona Hispanics Specifically Had 93% Of Education Related Conversations In English Language Used In Arizona By Hispanics To Discuss Education LANGUAGE USED IN ARIZONA BY HISPANICS TO DISCUSS EDUCATION Arizona Hispanics Specifically Had Of Education Related Conversations In English 93% Courtesy of Courtesy of
  18. 18. T H E S T A T E O F A R I Z O N A ’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T D A T O S A Z 2 0 1 5 241 CHAPTER 8 EDUCATIONSECTION II CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS Source: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 3,500 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations from Arizona (mentions of Arizona colleges and universities) and the Southwest (AZ, CA, CO, NM, NV, TX, and UT). Mentions In The Southwest Were Mostly Powered By Graduation, With That Topic Driving 89% Of All Spanglish Posts 89.08% 7.56% 2.52% 0.84% Graduation Studying Bilingual Mentions in the Southwest RegionsBILINGUAL MENTIONS IN THE SOUTHWEST REGION Source: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 3,500 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations from Arizona (mentions of Arizona colleges and universities) and the Southwest (AZ, CA, CO, NM, NV, TX, and UT). Overall, Hispanic Conversation In The Southwest Had Very Little Negative Sentiment (3%), Compared To 12% For Non-Hispanics 50.7% 46.3% 3.0% 44.9% 43.6% 11.5% Positive Neutral Negative Hispanic General Market Sentiment About Higher Education In The Southwest Region SENTIMENT ABOUT HIGHER EDUCATION IN THE SOUTHWEST REGION Overall, Hispanic Conversation In The Southwest Had Very Little Negative Sentiment (3%), Compared To 12% For Non-Hispanics 89% Bilingual Mentions In The Southwest Were Mostly Powered By Graduation, With That Topic Driving Of All Spanglish Posts Courtesy of Courtesy of
  19. 19. T H E S T A T E O F A R I Z O N A ’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T D A T O S A Z 2 0 1 5 242 CHAPTER 8 EDUCATIONSECTION II CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS Source: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 3,500 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations from Arizona (mentions of Arizona colleges and universities) and the Southwest (AZ, CA, CO, NM, NV, TX, and UT). Student Loans Sentiment in the Southwest Region 76.92% 15.38% 7.69% 86.7% 13.3% Neutral Positive Negative Hispanic General Market Southwest Region Hispanics Had A 15% Positive Sentiment About Student Loans, In Comparison To 13% Of The General Market STUDENT LOANS SENTIMENT IN THE SOUTHWEST REGION Southwest Region Hispanics Had A 15% Positive Sentiment About Student Loans, In Comparison To 13% Of The General Market Source: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 3,500 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations from Arizona (mentions of Arizona colleges and universities) and the Southwest (AZ, CA, CO, NM, NV, TX, and UT). 10% of Studying Mentions In Social Media By Hispanics In The Southwest Region Were In Spanglish 84.9% 10.5% 4.7% English Spanglish Spanish Language Used by Hispanics in the Southwest Region Mentioning Studying LANGUAGE USED BY HISPANICS IN THE SOUTHWEST REGION MENTIONING STUDYING 10% of Studying Mentions In Social Media By Hispanics In The Southwest Region Were In Spanglish Courtesy of Courtesy of 0%
  20. 20. T H E S T A T E O F A R I Z O N A ’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T D A T O S A Z 2 0 1 5 243 CHAPTER 8 EDUCATIONSECTION II CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS Source: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 3,500 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations from Arizona (mentions of Arizona colleges and universities) and the Southwest (AZ, CA, CO, NM, NV, TX, and UT). Graduation – Congratulating Their Family Member Of Friend And Thankful For Own Graduation 77.8% 16.9% 48.5% 36.4% Congratulations Thankful Hispanic General Market Hispanics Congratulated Their Friends/Family 78% Of The Time, While Non-Hispanics Congratulated Their Friends/Family 36% Of The Time GRADUATION – CONGRATULATING THEIR FAMILY MEMBER OR FRIEND AND THANKFUL FOR OWN GRADUATION Hispanics Congratulated Their Friends/Family 78% Of The Time, While Non-Hispanics Congratulated Their Friends/Family 36% Of The Time Source: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 3,500 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations from Arizona (mentions of Arizona colleges and universities) and the Southwest (AZ, CA, CO, NM, NV, TX, and UT). Graduation Sentiment 58.8% 39.7% 1.5% 69.7% 27.3% 3.0% Positive Neutral Negative Hispanic General Market Graduation Was The Most Discussed Topic Among Hispanics With 74% Of All Mentions And Drove 59% Positive Sentiment, While Non- Hispanics Drew 70% Positive Sentiment For The Same Topic GRADUATION SENTIMENT Graduation Was The Most Discussed Topic Among Hispanics With 74% Of All Mentions And Drove 59% Positive Sentiment, While Non-Hispanics Drew 70% Positive Sentiment For The Same Topic Courtesy of Courtesy of
  21. 21. T H E S T A T E O F A R I Z O N A ’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T D A T O S A Z 2 0 1 5 244 CHAPTER 8 EDUCATIONSECTION II CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS Source: OYE! Business Intelligence, Release 1 - June 15 - July 15 2015, 3,500 social media mentions sample. Data derived from verified Hispanic conversations from Arizona (mentions of Arizona colleges and universities) and the Southwest (AZ, CA, CO, NM, NV, TX, and UT). MEDIA CHANNELS USED BY HISPANICS IN THE SOUTHWEST REGION The Majority Of Southwest Hispanic Education Conversations Came From Instagram With 89% Of Total Volume From This Channel Courtesy of Media Channels Used By Hispanics In The Southwest Region 3.1% 88.7% 8.2% Facebook Instagram Twitter The Majority Of Southwest Hispanic Education Conversations Came From Instagram With 89% Of Total Volum Channel
  22. 22. DATOS 2015 Effective 09/11/15 T H E S T A T E O F A R I Z O N A ’ S H I S P A N I C M A R K E T THE ARIZONA HISPANIC CHAMBER OF COMMERCE LOS AMIGOS PARTNERS P L A T I N O O R O P L A T A B R O N C E

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