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Highlights from 
the Green Lane: 
A Comprehensive 
Evaluation of 
Protected Cycling 
Facilities 
PSU Friday Transportation...
Research Objectives 
• A field-based evaluation of protected 
bikeways in five U.S. cities to study: 
– Safety of users (b...
One-­‐way 
protected 
lane 
on 
both 
sides 
on 
a 
two-­‐ 
way 
street 
One-­‐way 
protected 
lane 
on 
both 
sides 
on 
...
Barton 
Springs 
Road 
– 
AusOn, 
TX 
Couplet 
of 
one-­‐way 
protected 
lanes 
on 
one-­‐way 
streets 
Oak/Fell 
Streets ...
Data Collected 
• Resident Surveys 
– 9,617 surveys mailed 
– 2,283 returned (34% used online option) 
– 24% response rate...
78% 
Resident Bicyclist 
25% 
97% 
72% 
28% 
73% 
32% 
56% 
37% 
7% 
5% 
6% 
89% 
1% 
93% 
7% 
48% 
89% 
0% 20% 40% 60% 80...
Residents by Primary Commute Mode 
0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 
7 
Non-commuter 
Mix 
Transit 
Bicycle 
Foo...
Today… 
1. Did the number of people bicycling 
change? 
2. How well do the designs work? 
3. Do the lane improve people’s ...
1. Did the number of people 
bicycling change? 
9
126% 
68% 
46% 46% 
21% 
171% 
65% 
36% 
180% 
160% 
140% 
120% 
100% 
80% 
60% 
40% 
20% 
0% 
Rio Grande Multnomah Bluebo...
Before the new facility was built, how 
would you have made this trip? 
By bicycle, using another route 
11 
60% 
38% 34% ...
2. How well do the designs work? 
12
Design Elements Evaluated 
• Intersections 
– Mixing zones 
– Fully signalized 
• Providing curb access 
– Loading zone 
–...
Mixing Zone Designs 
14 
NACTO-­‐Style 
Yield 
Shark 
Tooth 
Mixing 
Zone 
Photo 
from 
survey 
(shown): 
Multnomah 
and 
...
Total Video Observations 
Turning/Merging Motor 
Vehicles 
Bicyclists 
0 1,000 2,000 3,000 4,000 
15 
Connecticut Avenue 
...
Mixing Zone Design 
Survey Video Survey Video 
Percent 
Strongly 
Agreeing 
Bicyclists 
“Understand” 
Correctly Identified...
17 
Dearborn and Madison, Chicago, IL 
Photo: C. Monsere
Bicycle Signals on Dearborn 
• Using the small bicycle in the bicycle signal 
lens is a good way to communicate the 
signa...
2% 
6% 
19 
People on Bicycles 
Waited for green/legal right-turn on red Proceeded illegally on red 
93% 
77% 
92% 
7% 
23...
3. Do the lanes improve users’ 
perception of safety? 
20
Because of the protected bike lanes, the 
safety of _____ on the street has . . 
80% 
76% 
80% 
74% 
85% 
82% 
74% 
30% 
1...
I feel the safety of bicycling on ______ has . . 
Increased Somewhat Increased a Lot 
27% 
31% 
29% 
Austin Rio Grande 
SF...
Buffer 
type 
affects 
safety 
and 
comfort 
Types of buffers used include: 
Semi-­‐permanent 
planter 
with 
colored 
pav...
The buffer section with ______ between the 
traffic lanes and the bikeway makes me feel safe. 
1 2 3 4 
Paint, One-way 
Pa...
…buffer makes me feel safe 
3.80 
3.70 
3.60 
3.50 
3.40 
3.30 
3.20 
3.10 
3.00 
5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 
Mean Score 
Tot...
Very Uncomfortable (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) Very Comfortable (6) 
0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 
Buffer comfort 
With planters separa...
4. What do residents think about 
the lanes? 
27
Support for 
Protected 
Lanes 
28 
All Residents 
Car/Truck 
Non-commuters 
Source: Resident surveys, Green Lane evaluatio...
Because of the protected bike lanes, 
...my satisfaction with the walking 
environment on this street 
Increased No Change...
Perceptions of residents driving on street 
Percent responding increased 
30 
52% 
48% 
53% 
59% 
58% 
44% 
54% 
27% 
20% ...
Perceptions about Parking 
31 
30% 
44% 
41% 
49% 
46% 
55% 
0% 
10% 
20% 
30% 
40% 
50% 
60% 
70% 
Oak/Fell 
(-­‐50 
spot...
5. How attractive are the lanes 
for less comfortable cyclists? 
32
By the “Four 
Types” 
I 
would 
be 
more 
likely 
to 
ride 
a 
bicycle 
if 
motor 
vehicles 
and 
bicycles 
were 
physical...
Because of the protected bike lanes, the 
safety of _____ on the street has . . 
76% 
88% 
87% 
59% 
37% 
36% 
41% 
42% 
4...
Because of the ____ Street separated bikeway, 
how often I ride a bicycle overall has . . . 
60% 
50% 
40% 
30% 
20% 
10% ...
Summary 
• Analysis of data show increased bicycle 
volumes with some evidence of 
“attraction” 
• Strong improved percept...
Christopher 
M. 
Monsere 
Portland 
State 
University 
monsere@pdx.edu 
37 
Jennifer 
Dill 
Portland 
State 
University 
j...
Resident Survey 
City Route 
Resident Survey 
Distributed 
Paper 
Returns Web Returns Returned 
Response 
Rate 
Washington...
Bicyclist Survey 
City Route 
Bicyclist Survey 
Distributed Returned Response Rate 
Washington, DC L Street 763 300 39% 
A...
Facility 
Cross 
Street 
Type 
DescripOon 
Chicago 
N/S 
Dearborn 
Street 
Congress 
Parkway 
IntersecJon 
Two-­‐way 
faci...
Residents Typed to Geller’s Typology 
Strong and Fearless Enthused and Confident Interested but Concerned No Way No How 
2...
Buffer design affects comfort 
How comfortable would you feel bicycling on a commercial street with two lanes 
of traffic ...
Since the ______was built, do you 
travel on this route? 
43 
86% 
79% 
66% 
51% 
This is my first time on 
this route 
Mo...
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Highlights from the Green Lane: A Comprehensive Evaluation of Protected Cycling Facilities

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Chris Monsere and Jennifer Dill, Portland State University

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Highlights from the Green Lane: A Comprehensive Evaluation of Protected Cycling Facilities

  1. 1. Highlights from the Green Lane: A Comprehensive Evaluation of Protected Cycling Facilities PSU Friday Transportation Seminar May 2, 2014 1 Photo credit: Nathan McNeil, PSU Christopher M. Monsere, Jennifer Dill Kelly Cli5on, Nathan McNeil, Nick Foster, Tara Goddard Portland State University
  2. 2. Research Objectives • A field-based evaluation of protected bikeways in five U.S. cities to study: – Safety of users (both perceived and actual) – Effectiveness of the design – Perceptions of residents and other road users – Attractiveness to more casual cyclists – Change in economic activity 2
  3. 3. One-­‐way protected lane on both sides on a two-­‐ way street One-­‐way protected lane on both sides on a two-­‐ way street Dearborn Street -­‐ Chicago, IL Milwaukee Avenue Multnomah Street – Portland, OR Two-­‐way protected lane on one-­‐way street -­‐ Chicago, IL L Street – Washington, DC One-­‐way protected lane on a one-­‐way street
  4. 4. Barton Springs Road – AusOn, TX Couplet of one-­‐way protected lanes on one-­‐way streets Oak/Fell Streets – San Francisco, CA Bluebonnet Lane – Two-­‐way protected lane on a two-­‐way street AusOn, TX One-­‐way protected lane on the south side of the road (other direcOon is shared use path) Rio Grande Street -­‐ Two-­‐way protected lane on one-­‐way street AusOn, TX
  5. 5. Data Collected • Resident Surveys – 9,617 surveys mailed – 2,283 returned (34% used online option) – 24% response rate • Bicyclist Surveys – 3,409 bicyclists intercepted – 1,111 surveys completed – 33% response rate • Video Recorded at Intersections – 16 locations in 4 cities – 204 hours analyzed – 21,728 bicyclists and 23,347 turning vehicles observed 5
  6. 6. 78% Resident Bicyclist 25% 97% 72% 28% 73% 32% 56% 37% 7% 5% 6% 89% 1% 93% 7% 48% 89% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Four year degree + Income >$100k Work From Home Work Outside Home Asian Hispanic or Latino/a Black White 55 + years 35 to 54 years <35 years of age Female 34% Own working bicycle Own/Lease a car Car Share Membership Transit Pass Driver's License Children in HH 2+ 64% Adults in HH 55% Home Owners 15% 96% 50% 18% 81% 67% 53% 26% 40% 81% 6% 5% 5% 66% 15% 41% 83% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Four year degree + Income >$100k Work From Home Work Outside Home Asian Hispanic or Latino/a Black White 55 + years 35 to 54 years <35 years of age Female Own working bicycle Own/Lease a car Car Share Membership Transit Pass Driver's License Children in HH 2+ Adults in HH Home Owners 6 Source: Resident and Bicyclist surveys, Green Lane evaluation
  7. 7. Residents by Primary Commute Mode 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 7 Non-commuter Mix Transit Bicycle Foot Car / Truck Source: Resident surveys, Green Lane evaluation
  8. 8. Today… 1. Did the number of people bicycling change? 2. How well do the designs work? 3. Do the lane improve people’s perceptions of safety? 4. What do residents think about the lanes? 5. How attractive are the lanes for less comfortable cyclists? 8
  9. 9. 1. Did the number of people bicycling change? 9
  10. 10. 126% 68% 46% 46% 21% 171% 65% 36% 180% 160% 140% 120% 100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0% Rio Grande Multnomah Bluebonnet Fell Milwaukee Dearborn L Street Barton Springs Percent Increase Change in Observed Bicycle Volumes Source: City-provided before and after counts, PSU video counts, ACS Survey 10 Bike Lanes Prior No Bike Lanes Prior
  11. 11. Before the new facility was built, how would you have made this trip? By bicycle, using another route 11 60% 38% 34% 32% 29% Would not have taken trip By other mode 18% 11% 6% 21% 7% 10% 10% 6% 6% 7% 10% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% Dearborn Rio Grande Multnomah L Street Barton Springs Oak Street Fell Street Milwaukee Source: Cyclist intercept surveys, Green Lane evaluation
  12. 12. 2. How well do the designs work? 12
  13. 13. Design Elements Evaluated • Intersections – Mixing zones – Fully signalized • Providing curb access – Loading zone – Transit stops • Other design elements – Width – Green pavement marking – Minor driveways 13
  14. 14. Mixing Zone Designs 14 NACTO-­‐Style Yield Shark Tooth Mixing Zone Photo from survey (shown): Multnomah and NE 9th, Video LocaJon(s): Multnomah and NE 9th Flexpost Delimited Mixing Zone with Advisory Bike Lane (ABL) Photo from survey (shown): L Street Video LocaJon(s): L Street/ 15th Street, L Street/ ConnecJcut Mixing Zone with Advisory Bike Lane (ABL) Photo from survey (shown): Oak St. and Divisadero St. Video LocaJon(s): Oak St. and Divisadero St. Mixing Zone with Advisory Bike Lane (ABL) Photo from survey (shown): Fell St. and Divisadero St. Video LocaJon(s): No video Mixing zone w/ green-­‐back sharrow mixing zone Photo from survey (shown): Oak St. and Broderick St. Video LocaJon(s): Oak St. and Broderick St Mixing Zone with Full Green Skip Marking Photo from survey (shown): Fell St. and Broderick St. Video LocaJon(s): Fell St. and Baker
  15. 15. Total Video Observations Turning/Merging Motor Vehicles Bicyclists 0 1,000 2,000 3,000 4,000 15 Connecticut Avenue 15th Street Btwn 19th St / 18th St (Hotel) Divisadero Street Broderick Street Baker Street 11th Street (Transit Stop) 11th Street (intersection) 9th Street 7th Street Grand Avenue Elston Avenue Desplaines Street Randolph Street Madison Street Congress Parkway Number Observed DC SF PDX CHI (6 hours)
  16. 16. Mixing Zone Design Survey Video Survey Video Percent Strongly Agreeing Bicyclists “Understand” Correctly Identified Location Correct Lane Use Percent Calculated Conflict Bicycle Turning Right Thorough Turning Turning Through Rates Bicycles Motorist Motorist Bicyclist Strongly Agreeing Vehicles Yield Agreeing They Feel Safe Flexpost Delimited Mixing Zone with Advisory Bike Lane (ABL): L Street 85% - - - 87% 91% 17% 64% 0.16 NACTO-Style Yield Shark Tooth Mixing Zone: Multnomah/ 9th 63% 51% 98% 79% 93% 63% 14% 73% 0.37 Mixing Zone with Advisory Bike Lane (ABL): Oak/ Divisadero 75% 94% 73% 92% 66% 81% 19% 74% 0.12 Mixing Zone with Advisory Bike Lane (ABL): Fell/ Divisadero 81% 93% 74% 97% - - 15% 72% - Mixing zone w/ green-back sharrow mixing zone: Oak/Broderick 71% 79% 97% 95% 48% 30% 15% 79% 0.44 Mixing Zone with Full Green Skip Marking: Fell/ Broderick or Fell/Baker 74% 73% 96% 95% 49% - 22% 84% 0.13 16
  17. 17. 17 Dearborn and Madison, Chicago, IL Photo: C. Monsere
  18. 18. Bicycle Signals on Dearborn • Using the small bicycle in the bicycle signal lens is a good way to communicate the signal is only for bicycles – 87% agree • I like that bicyclists and turning cars each have their own signal – 74% agree • At these intersections, it is always clear to me which signal I should use as a motorist – 66% agree 18
  19. 19. 2% 6% 19 People on Bicycles Waited for green/legal right-turn on red Proceeded illegally on red 93% 77% 92% 7% 23% 8% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Dearborn/ Randolph Dearborn/ Madison Dearborn/ Congress People in Motor Vehicles Legal Turn on Green Illegal Turn on Red Arrow Jumped into crosswalk 92% 90% 84% 5% 10% 6% 6% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Dearborn/ Randolph Dearborn/ Madison Dearborn/ Congress
  20. 20. 3. Do the lanes improve users’ perception of safety? 20
  21. 21. Because of the protected bike lanes, the safety of _____ on the street has . . 80% 76% 80% 74% 85% 82% 74% 30% 19% 23% 28% 43% 38% 38% 45% 27% 15% 44% 52% 21% 37% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Portland, Multnomah San Francisco, Oak Austin, Bluebonnet Austin, Barton Springs Chicago, Milwaukee Chicago, Dearborn Washington DC - L St. Percent of Residents Stating “Safety Increased" Walking Driving Bicycling Source: Resident Surveys, Green Lane evaluation 21
  22. 22. I feel the safety of bicycling on ______ has . . Increased Somewhat Increased a Lot 27% 31% 29% Austin Rio Grande SF Oak / Fell Portland Multnomah Chicago Milwuakie DC L Street Chicago Dearborn Source: Cyclist intercept surveys, Green Lane evaluation 22 33% 18% 33% 18% 66% 81% 59% 65% 66% 82% 56% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Austin Barton Springs
  23. 23. Buffer type affects safety and comfort Types of buffers used include: Semi-­‐permanent planter with colored pavement (Multnomah St., Portland) Parked vehicles and flexposts (Milwaukee Avenue, Chicago) Flexposts and painted buffer (Fell Street, San Francisco) 23
  24. 24. The buffer section with ______ between the traffic lanes and the bikeway makes me feel safe. 1 2 3 4 Paint, One-way Paint, One-way Flexposts, One-way Flexposts, One-way Flexposts, One-way Flexposts, One-way Flexposts, Two-way Planters, One-way Flexposts, Two-way Parked Cars, One-way Flexposts, One-way Parked Cars, Two-way Curb, Grass (Path), Seperated Path Mean Score 24 Source: Cyclist intercept surveys, Green Lane evaluation Two-­‐way One-­‐way
  25. 25. …buffer makes me feel safe 3.80 3.70 3.60 3.50 3.40 3.30 3.20 3.10 3.00 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 Mean Score Total Width (ft) Far Edge of Bicycle Facility to Near Edge of Motor Vehicle Lane 25 (shared-­‐use path)
  26. 26. Very Uncomfortable (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) Very Comfortable (6) 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Buffer comfort With planters separating the bikeway With a 2-3 foot buffer and plastic flexposts With a raised concrete curb With a painted buffer and parked cars With a painted 2-3 foot buffer With a solid painted buffer 26 Source: Cyclist intercept surveys, Green Lane evaluation
  27. 27. 4. What do residents think about the lanes? 27
  28. 28. Support for Protected Lanes 28 All Residents Car/Truck Non-commuters Source: Resident surveys, Green Lane evaluation 66% 43% 47% 39% 43% 45% 36% 95% 75% 83% 79% 75% 76% 84% 82% 78% 79% 69% 97% 88% 80% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Mix Transit Foot Bicycle Facilities that encourage bicycling for transportation are a good way to improve public health. I would support building more protected bike lanes at other locations. Because of the protected bike lanes, the desirability of living in my neighborhood has increased
  29. 29. Because of the protected bike lanes, ...my satisfaction with the walking environment on this street Increased No Change 36% 33% 37% 49% 58% 19% 17% 53% 49% 41% 37% 56% 54% 56% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% L Street Oak/Fell Multnomah Milwaukee Dearborn Bluebonnet Barton Springs ...my sense of safety when crossing this street has Increased No Change 27% 24% 35% 17% 34% 43% 18% 53% 55% 57% 51% 46% 38% 57% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% L Street Oak/Fell Multnomah Milwaukee Dearborn Bluebonnet Barton Springs 29 Source: Resident Surveys, 78% of respondents have walked on street, Green Lane evaluation
  30. 30. Perceptions of residents driving on street Percent responding increased 30 52% 48% 53% 59% 58% 44% 54% 27% 20% 15% 18% 54% 63% 32% 22% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% L Street Fell Oak Multnomah Milwaukee Dearborn Bluebonnet Barton Springs Since the protected bike lanes were built, the amount of time it takes me to drive on this street has . . . Since the protected bike lanes were built, how safe and predictable bicyclists are acting has . . .
  31. 31. Perceptions about Parking 31 30% 44% 41% 49% 46% 55% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% Oak/Fell (-­‐50 spots) Milwaukee (-­‐some) L Street (-­‐150 spots) Bluebonnet (-­‐some) Dearborn (-­‐minimal) Multnomah (+20 spots) % indicating negative impact on... ability to find a parking spot on the street how stressful it is to park on the street
  32. 32. 5. How attractive are the lanes for less comfortable cyclists? 32
  33. 33. By the “Four Types” I would be more likely to ride a bicycle if motor vehicles and bicycles were physically separated by a barrier. 33 Strong and Fearless, 5% Enthused and Confident, 27% Interested but Concerned, 43% No Way No How, 25% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Share of Residents 43% 62% 85% 37% Strong and Fearless Enthused and Confident Interested but Concerned No Way No How
  34. 34. Because of the protected bike lanes, the safety of _____ on the street has . . 76% 88% 87% 59% 37% 36% 41% 42% 46% 21% 37% 17% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% No Way No How Interested But Concerned Enthused and Confident Strong and Fearless Percent of Residents Stating "safety increased" Walking Driving Bicycling Source: Resident Surveys, Green Lane evaluation 34
  35. 35. Because of the ____ Street separated bikeway, how often I ride a bicycle overall has . . . 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% Increased Somewhat Increased a lot Men Women Men Women Men Women Men Women Men Women Men Women San Francisco Washington DC Chicago Austin Portland Overall Source: Cyclist intercept surveys, Green Lane evaluation 35
  36. 36. Summary • Analysis of data show increased bicycle volumes with some evidence of “attraction” • Strong improved perception of safety for people riding on the facilities • Generally positive perceptions for other road users • Support for the protected lane concept • Design choices affect safety and comfort • ….more to come! 36
  37. 37. Christopher M. Monsere Portland State University monsere@pdx.edu 37 Jennifer Dill Portland State University jdill@pdx.edu Kelly Cli5on Portland State University kcli5on@pdx.edu QuesJons? Thanks to students: Chase Ballew, Dan Stumpf, Dan Mercer, Lisa Okimoto, Alison Duncan, Belinada Judelman Thanks to City partners: Mike Amsden (CDOT), David Smith (CDOT), Jim Sebastian (DDOT), Mike Goodno (DDOT), Roger Geller (PBOT), Rob Burchfield (PBOT), Ross Swanson (PBOT), Seleta Reynolds (SFMTA), Miriam Sorell (SFMTA), Annick Beaudet (Austin), Nathan Wilkes (Austin)
  38. 38. Resident Survey City Route Resident Survey Distributed Paper Returns Web Returns Returned Response Rate Washington, DC L Street 1800 148 88 236 13% Austin, TX Bluebonnet Lane 1300 304 135 439 34% Barton Springs Road* 300 55 36 91 30% Rio Grande Street - - - San Francisco, CA Oak /Fell 1967 318 199 517 26% Chicago, IL N/S Dearborn Street 1200 121 76 197 16% N Milwaukee Avenue 1500 185 126 311 21% Portland, OR NE Multnomah Street 1550 368 124 492 32% Overall 9617 1499 784 2283 24% 38
  39. 39. Bicyclist Survey City Route Bicyclist Survey Distributed Returned Response Rate Washington, DC L Street 763 300 39% Austin, TX Bluebonnet Lane - - - Barton Springs Road* 73 18 25% Rio Grande Street 98 43 44% San Francisco, CA Oak /Fell 900 278 31% Chicago, IL N/S Dearborn Street 600 124 21% N Milwaukee Avenue 775 236 30% Portland, OR NE Multnomah Street 200 112 56% Overall 3409 1111 33% 39
  40. 40. Facility Cross Street Type DescripOon Chicago N/S Dearborn Street Congress Parkway IntersecJon Two-­‐way facility, MV le_-­‐turn signalized Madison Street IntersecJon Two-­‐way facility, MV le_-­‐turn signalized Randolph Street IntersecJon Two-­‐way facility, MV le_-­‐turn signalized N Milwaukee Avenue Desplaines Street IntersecJon MVs and Bicyclists weave to make le_-­‐ turns Elston Avenue IntersecJon Bicycle signal, right-­‐turn over facility Grand Avenue IntersecJon Right-­‐turn lane on right side of facility Portland NE Multnomah Street 7th Street IntersecJon Right turn over facility, skip crossing markings 9th Street IntersecJon Mixing zone w/ right-­‐turning MVs 11th Street Transit Right turn over facility, skip crossing markings San Francisco Fell Street Baker Street IntersecJon Mixing zone w/ le_-­‐turning MVs, green bars across mixing zone Oak Street Broderick Street IntersecJon Mixing zone w/ right-­‐turning MVs and green backed sharrows Divisadero Street IntersecJon Mixing zone w/ right-­‐turning MVs and advisory bike lane (ABL) D.C. L Street NW Btwn 19th St and 18th St Hotel Zone Loading zone with MV entrance and exit 15th Street IntersecJon Mixing zone w/ le_-­‐turning traffic and ABL ConnecJcut Avenue IntersecJon Mixing zone w/ le_-­‐turning traffic and ABL 40
  41. 41. Residents Typed to Geller’s Typology Strong and Fearless Enthused and Confident Interested but Concerned No Way No How 27% 26% 25% 22% 31% 32% 43% 40% 36% 56% 40% 40% 25% 28% 22% 18% 27% 30% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% All Washington, DC San Francisco Portland Chicago Austin 41 Source: Resident surveys, Green Lane evaluation
  42. 42. Buffer design affects comfort How comfortable would you feel bicycling on a commercial street with two lanes of traffic in each direction, with traffic speeds of 35 miles per hour, but with the following types of separation from traffic? 6 5 4 3 2 1 With a solid painted buffer With a painted 2-3 foot buffer With a painted buffer and parked cars With a raised concrete curb With a 2-3 foot buffer and plastic flexposts With planters separating the bikeway Comfort Mean Score Portland - Multnomah DC - L Street Chi - Milw Street Chi - Dearborn SF - Oak Austin - Barton Austin - Rio Grande 42 Source: Cyclist intercept surveys, Green Lane evaluation
  43. 43. Since the ______was built, do you travel on this route? 43 86% 79% 66% 51% This is my first time on this route More frequently 44% 39% 31% 28% 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% Dearborn Rio Grande L Street Multnomah Oak Street Barton Springs Milwaukee Fell Street Source: Cyclist intercept surveys, Green Lane evaluation

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