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From Confrontation to Partnership: City Regulation of Micromobility

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William Henderson, Ride Report

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From Confrontation to Partnership: City Regulation of Micromobility

  1. 1. Making Micromobility Work William Henderson CEO and Co-Founder November 15, 2019 www.ridereport.com
  2. 2. Remember bikeshare back in 2017? (‘micromobility’ wasn’t a thing yet)
  3. 3. And the data?
  4. 4. Hoses…
  5. 5. .csv files
  6. 6. … and App Data
  7. 7. And then the heavens opened… and rained down scooters.
  8. 8. How’s scooter sharing going?
  9. 9. I might lose control of the right-of-way and some one might get hurt! Cities don’t understand our business and don’t listen! Just give me a @#*$ing scooter! [Alternately, get this @#*%ing scooter outta here!] Cities Operators Citizens
  10. 10. We all want micromobility to succeed.
  11. 11. Cities Operators Citizens I need to provide transportation options that are safer, more equitable and more sustainable. I need to be able to create a profitable service that people love using. I need access to reliable, safe, affordable transportation.
  12. 12. Accessible, Accurate Data Measurable Goals Regs 🛴🛴🛴🛴🛴 🛴🛴 🛴🛴 Equity Safety Fees
  13. 13. Define goals ‣ Create rules that help you meet those goals ‣ Focus evaluation on measuring against those goals ‣ Note: rules must be enforceable and measurable
  14. 14. Equity approaches ‣ Distribution/ deployment
 ‣ Low income rates ‣ Adaptive hardware
  15. 15. Equity is complicated. Cities and operators should to work with communities to understand context and mobility needs.
  16. 16. Safety ‣ Micromobility users ‣ Micromobility non-users ‣ Reporting ‣ Context and moving beyond headlines City of Atlanta
  17. 17. Data ‣ Use the MDS open standard ‣ Data must be audited for accuracy and completeness ‣ Location data is extremely sensitive!
  18. 18. + +
  19. 19. Fleet caps ‣ Work with operators on viability within regulatory context ‣ Flat versus performance ‣ Avoids a Monopoly Regulations:
  20. 20. Designated Parking Zones Regulations:
  21. 21. Equity Strategies Regulations: ‣ Targeted Deployment Areas ‣ Equity Pricing ‣ Watch for outcomes!
  22. 22. Fees ‣ Avoid flat program fees, vehicle and/or usage instead ‣ Flat versus dynamic ‣ Create incentives ‣ Sustainability ‣ Transparent and near-term expenditure plan Program Permit Vehicle Permit Usage Fee Austin $ 0 $ 60.00 Chicago $ 250 $ 120.00 - DC $ 100 $ 60.00 - Durham $ 15,000 $ 100.00 - Fort Lauderdale $ 100 $ 10.00 - Los Angeles $ 20,000 $ 130.00 - Oakland $ 30,000 $ 64.00 $0.102 Portland $ 500 $ 80.00 $0.373 San Diego $ 10,000 $ 150.00 - Santa Monica $ 20,000 $ 130.00 $0.254 Saint Paul $ 0 $ 100.00 $0.255 Average $ 8,723 $ 91.28 $0.24 2 When parked or left standing in a metered zone during hours of operation 3 Fees range from $.30 - $.45. 4 Based on $1/day/vehicle charge and 4 trip/vehicle/day target utilization rate. 5 For trips that begin or end on parkland.
  23. 23. The best programs foster public- private collaboration built on trust and respect. www.ridereport.com
  24. 24. &Q

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