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Contextual Guidance at Intersections for
Protected Bicycle Lanes
NITC Webinar
October 8, 2019
PSU: Chris Monsere, Nathan M...
Today’s Outline
2
• Background and research approach
• Development of survey
• Survey results
• Simulation modeling
• Cont...
Note on Final Report
3
• Currently addressing the last of the technical
review panel’s peer-review comments.
• Report to p...
Key Take Aways
4
• Research developed estimates of perceived
comfort of typical intersection designs.
• Separation (in tim...
Background and Research
Approach
5
Protected Bike Lanes
• Protected/separated bike lanes are preferred by
cyclists and potential cyclists (Sanders, 2016; McN...
In Person
Survey
Video
observation
Micro-
simulation
Expected
conflicts by
design and
volume of
vehicles
Relative comfort
...
Scope
• One-way configurations
• Focus on the right-turning interaction
• Designs evaluated
• Maintain separation
• No Ben...
Design Option: Bend-in
Shifts the bike lane in toward the motor vehicle lanes, which can
increase visibility and awareness...
Design Option: Bend-out
Shifts the bike lane away from the motor vehicle traffic, which results in
turning motorists havin...
Design Option: Bike Signal
Motor vehicle traffic and bicycle traffic have separate traffic signals that
separate out their...
Design Option: Mixing Zone
Establishes a right turn lane and ends the bike lane, creating a mixing
area for bicyclists and...
Design Option: Lateral Shift
Moves the bicyclist in and provides a crossing area for turning motorists
to shift into a tur...
Development of Survey
Instrument
14
Collecting and Curating
Sample Clips
10 locations from:
• Denver, CO
• Portland, OR
• Salt Lake City, UT
• Seattle, WA
15
16
Location City Design Type
Bend
(ft.)
Mix/
merge
(ft.)
Exposure
distance1
(ft.)
Arapahoe at 18th Denver, CO Bike signal ...
Mixing Zones
Salt Lake City
300S at 200E
Portland
NE Multnomah
17
Seattle
Dexter at Harrison
Denver
Arapahoe at 18th
Mixing Zone
Bicycle Signal
18
Lateral Shift
Denver
Lawrence and 19th
Seattle
Roosevelt NE at 50th
19
Bend In
Salt Lake City
300S at 300E EB
Denver
W 14th Ave at Delaware
20
Bend Out /
Protected Intersection
Salt Lake City
200W at 300S
Portland
Multnomah and 11th
No Bend
21
Springwater Corridor Trail,
Portland, OR
Avg. Rating = 4.77
NE Multnomah Protected Lane,
Portland, OR
Avg. Rating = 4.54
2...
Example clip - Interaction
23
https://youtu.be/VrFGqoBrgaA
Example clip – Turn Visible
24https://youtu.be/ONUwFDADf-Y
In Person Survey
25
In Person Survey
101
42
57
77
Portland, OR
Woodburn, OR
Minneapolis, MN
Takoma Park, MD
Number of responses
• 277 individu...
Who took the survey?
Female
56%
Male
44%
White, non-Hispanic
70%Black or African-
American
4%
Asian or Pacific
Islander
10...
Who took the survey?
28
90% have driver’s license
58% had a working bicycle
45% had a transit pass
57% had a car or truck
...
Issues to consider with sample
• Not random sample, self-selection bias
• Higher educational attainment than US as a
whole...
Survey Results
30
16%
12%
33%
25%
21%
25%
6%
9%
White,
non-Hispanic
Hispanic or
non-white
COMFORT BY RACE/ETHNICITY
12%
18%
29%
31%
25%
17%
...
Mean comfort score
with and without turning interactions
3.77
3.95
3.47
3.63
3.03
3.14
1 2 3 4 5
Bicycle Signal (*)
Protec...
Mean comfort score
with and without turning interactions
3.77
3.95
3.47
3.63
3.03
3.14
3.7
3.12
3.01
3.04
2.8
1 2 3 4 5
Bi...
Percent comfortable by exposure distance
20%
30%
40%
50%
60%
70%
0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 200
PercentComfortable
...
89%
70%
68%
51%
31%
25%
Baseline -
protected bike
lane
Bend in Protected
Intersection
Maintain
separation -
straight
Later...
Would you prefer to ride through
intersection A or B on a bicycle?
Of those who chose A, reasons include*:
• Preferred the...
Would you prefer to ride through
intersection C or D on a bicycle?
Of those who chose C, reasons include*:
• Protection an...
Now, compare your preference from A/B
to your preference from C/D. Which would
you prefer to ride through on a bicycle?
A
...
“Bike Inclined”
• Feel that destinations
were within bikeable
distances
• Not deterred by traffic
• Saw people like them
r...
Percentage Comfortable by Design Type
30%
32%
52%
60%
65%
61%
37%
31%
35%
39%
61%
Indifferent to
Bicycling
47%
59%
64%
68%...
Simulation Modeling
41
Observed Turning Speeds (mph)
8.70
10.57
6.59
7.58
8.58
9.38
Bicycles Right-Turn
Vehicles
Bicycles Right-Turn
Vehicles
Bic...
Right-
turning
volume
(veh/hr)
Bicycle volume (veh/hr)
25 50 75 100 150 200
50
100
150
200
250
Microsimulation
• 10 calibr...
Number of simulated conflicts
per hour (mixing zone design)
Right-turning
volume
(veh/hr)
Bicycle volume (veh/hr)
25 50 75...
0.00
0.05
0.10
0.15
0.20
0.25
0.30
0.35
50 100 150 200 250
NumberofConflicts/Bicycle
Right-turning volume (veh/hr), Bicycl...
Contextual Guidance
46
Weighted Comfort Scores
CTV =No
vehicle
interaction
(turn visible)
Comfort
Scores,
by typology
CN =With
vehicle
interactio...
Percent Comfortable, Interested but Concerned
Percent
Comfortable
Mixing
zone
Lateral
Shift
Bend in
Maintain
separation
Si...
Some Limitations
• Research did not study the safety of design options
(either in terms of reported crashes or other
surro...
Conclusions
50
Conclusions (1)
• Separation matters:
• Protected intersections and bike signals were found to
provide the best expected r...
Conclusions (2)
• “Interested but Concerned”
• As found in past research finding, this group tends
to be the most responsi...
Other resources
53
Acknowledgements
This project was funded by a pooled fund organized by the National
Institute for Transportation and Commu...
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Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 1 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 2 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 3 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 4 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 5 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 6 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 7 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 8 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 9 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 10 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 11 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 12 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 13 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 14 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 15 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 16 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 17 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 18 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 19 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 20 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 21 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 22 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 23 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 24 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 25 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 26 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 27 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 28 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 29 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 30 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 31 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 32 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 33 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 34 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 35 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 36 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 37 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 38 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 39 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 40 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 41 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 42 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 43 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 44 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 45 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 46 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 47 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 48 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 49 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 50 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 51 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 52 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 53 Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes Slide 54
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Chris Monsere and Nathan McNeil, Portland State University

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Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes

  1. 1. Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes NITC Webinar October 8, 2019 PSU: Chris Monsere, Nathan McNeil, Yi Wang TDG: Rebecca Sanders, Rob Burchfield and Bill Schultheiss 1
  2. 2. Today’s Outline 2 • Background and research approach • Development of survey • Survey results • Simulation modeling • Contextual guidance • Conclusions
  3. 3. Note on Final Report 3 • Currently addressing the last of the technical review panel’s peer-review comments. • Report to published by NITC very soon. • Some minor changes to material presented here are possible.
  4. 4. Key Take Aways 4 • Research developed estimates of perceived comfort of typical intersection designs. • Separation (in time or space) and distance exposed to traffic are key drivers of comfort. • Bend out / offset / protected and fully signalized designs provide most comfort to the most people. • Actual safety of designs not addressed by this research. • Recent NY DOT “Cycling at Crossroads” provides good information
  5. 5. Background and Research Approach 5
  6. 6. Protected Bike Lanes • Protected/separated bike lanes are preferred by cyclists and potential cyclists (Sanders, 2016; McNeil et al. 2015; Dill and McNeil 2016). • In general, protected/separated bike lanes are associated with increased safety (Marshall and Ferenchak 2019; Harris et al. 2013; Teschke et al., 2012; Lusk et al. 2013). • Intersections are the weak link: • Safety (in terms of reported crashes and observed conflicts) is an essential consideration. • Perceived comfort is also a key consideration for cities attempting to build connected low-stress networks, given the link between perceived comfort and ridership 6
  7. 7. In Person Survey Video observation Micro- simulation Expected conflicts by design and volume of vehicles Relative comfort by design and interaction with vehicles Data OutcomesAnalysis Contextual guidance: Comfort thresholds based on design and volume Research Overview 7
  8. 8. Scope • One-way configurations • Focus on the right-turning interaction • Designs evaluated • Maintain separation • No Bend • Bend In • Bend Out (Protected Intersection) • Bike Signal • Mix bicycles and vehicles • Mixing Zones • Lateral Shift 8
  9. 9. Design Option: Bend-in Shifts the bike lane in toward the motor vehicle lanes, which can increase visibility and awareness of bicyclists and motorists of one another. 9 Source: Fig. 25. FHWA Separated Bike Lane Planning and Design Guide (2015), page 108
  10. 10. Design Option: Bend-out Shifts the bike lane away from the motor vehicle traffic, which results in turning motorists having exited the through travel lane prior to crossing the bike lane, slowing their speed and approaching the crossing at closer to a 90 degree angle. 10 Source: Fig. 26/ FHWA Separated Bike Lane Planning and Design Guide (2015), page 109
  11. 11. Design Option: Bike Signal Motor vehicle traffic and bicycle traffic have separate traffic signals that separate out their movements in time. 11Source: Fig. 22. FHWA Separated Bike Lane Planning and Design Guide (2015), page 109
  12. 12. Design Option: Mixing Zone Establishes a right turn lane and ends the bike lane, creating a mixing area for bicyclists and turning motorists. 12 Source: Fig. 24. FHWA Separated Bike Lane Planning and Design Guide (2015), page 107
  13. 13. Design Option: Lateral Shift Moves the bicyclist in and provides a crossing area for turning motorists to shift into a turn lane, with their paths crossing before the bike lane is reestablished to the inside of the turn lane. 13 Source: Fig. 23. FHWA Separated Bike Lane Planning and Design Guide (2015), page 105
  14. 14. Development of Survey Instrument 14
  15. 15. Collecting and Curating Sample Clips 10 locations from: • Denver, CO • Portland, OR • Salt Lake City, UT • Seattle, WA 15
  16. 16. 16 Location City Design Type Bend (ft.) Mix/ merge (ft.) Exposure distance1 (ft.) Arapahoe at 18th Denver, CO Bike signal - - 78 200W at 300S Salt Lake City, UT Bend-out / protected intersection + 12 - 15 + 252 14th at Delaware Denver, CO Bend-in - 8 - 65 300S at 300E Salt Lake City, UT Bend-in - 12 45 199 Lawrence at 19th Denver, CO Lateral shift - 15 110 190 Roosevelt at 50th Seattle, WA Lateral shift - 10 55 140 NE Multnomah at 11th Portland, OR No Bend - - 54 NE Multnomah at 9th Portland, OR Mixing zone - 95 162 300S at 200E Salt Lake City, UT Mixing zone - 30 145 Dexter at Harrison Seattle, WA Mixing zone - 40 102 1 The protected intersection location crossing had a median, thus breaking the crossing distance into two sections of 15 feet and then 25 feet.
  17. 17. Mixing Zones Salt Lake City 300S at 200E Portland NE Multnomah 17
  18. 18. Seattle Dexter at Harrison Denver Arapahoe at 18th Mixing Zone Bicycle Signal 18
  19. 19. Lateral Shift Denver Lawrence and 19th Seattle Roosevelt NE at 50th 19
  20. 20. Bend In Salt Lake City 300S at 300E EB Denver W 14th Ave at Delaware 20
  21. 21. Bend Out / Protected Intersection Salt Lake City 200W at 300S Portland Multnomah and 11th No Bend 21
  22. 22. Springwater Corridor Trail, Portland, OR Avg. Rating = 4.77 NE Multnomah Protected Lane, Portland, OR Avg. Rating = 4.54 22 Controls: Off Street Path Protected Bike Lane Segment
  23. 23. Example clip - Interaction 23 https://youtu.be/VrFGqoBrgaA
  24. 24. Example clip – Turn Visible 24https://youtu.be/ONUwFDADf-Y
  25. 25. In Person Survey 25
  26. 26. In Person Survey 101 42 57 77 Portland, OR Woodburn, OR Minneapolis, MN Takoma Park, MD Number of responses • 277 individuals • 26 clips rating each, some on riding with children • 7,166 total ratings 26
  27. 27. Who took the survey? Female 56% Male 44% White, non-Hispanic 70%Black or African- American 4% Asian or Pacific Islander 10% Hispanic and/or latina/o 10% other 2% Multi-racial 4% 18 to 24 23% 25 to 34 27% 35 to 54 25% 55 + 25% 27
  28. 28. Who took the survey? 28 90% have driver’s license 58% had a working bicycle 45% had a transit pass 57% had a car or truck Primarily Car 16% Mostly Car 31% Mix 21% Primarily Transit 20% Primarily Bike 12% Travel behavior categories Last month 36% Last year 13% Last 5 yrs 15% More than 5 yrs 10% Never 26% Most recent biking for transportation
  29. 29. Issues to consider with sample • Not random sample, self-selection bias • Higher educational attainment than US as a whole • In survey 31% had less than bachelors, compared to 68% nationally • Less likely to have kids in household than US as a whole • In survey 16% compared to 29% nationally • Differences between location and sample demographics • Older and less racially diverse in some locations 29
  30. 30. Survey Results 30
  31. 31. 16% 12% 33% 25% 21% 25% 6% 9% White, non-Hispanic Hispanic or non-white COMFORT BY RACE/ETHNICITY 12% 18% 29% 31% 25% 17% 10% 5% Women Men COMFORT BY GENDER IDENTITY 31
  32. 32. Mean comfort score with and without turning interactions 3.77 3.95 3.47 3.63 3.03 3.14 1 2 3 4 5 Bicycle Signal (*) Protected Intersection Bend-in Maintain separation / straight path Mixing zone Lateral Shift Mean comfort score (1-5) Interaction with turning vehicle No interaction 67% 72% 54% 59% 37% 40% 0% 20% 40% 60% Percentage Comfortable 32
  33. 33. Mean comfort score with and without turning interactions 3.77 3.95 3.47 3.63 3.03 3.14 3.7 3.12 3.01 3.04 2.8 1 2 3 4 5 Bicycle Signal (*) Protected Intersection Bend-in Maintain separation / straight path Mixing zone Lateral Shift Mean comfort score (1-5) Interaction with turning vehicle No interaction 67% 72% 54% 59% 37% 40% 63% 40% 35% 37% 32% 0% 20% 40% 60% Percentage Comfortable 33
  34. 34. Percent comfortable by exposure distance 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 200 PercentComfortable Exposure distance (loss of buffer to far side of street) (ft) 34
  35. 35. 89% 70% 68% 51% 31% 25% Baseline - protected bike lane Bend in Protected Intersection Maintain separation - straight Lateral shift, post delineated Short mix zone Would ride with a 10 year old in this location? 35
  36. 36. Would you prefer to ride through intersection A or B on a bicycle? Of those who chose A, reasons include*: • Preferred the yield sign/markings (19%) • Not having to cross a car lane (18%) • Being able to stay to the right (10%) Of those who chose B, reasons include*: • Liking the separation from vehicles (35%) • Clear lane marking (31%) • Like the green color (21%) 36
  37. 37. Would you prefer to ride through intersection C or D on a bicycle? Of those who chose C, reasons include*: • Protection and separation from vehicles (43%) • Improved visibility and turning angle (34%) • Clear markings (17%) • Slows down drivers, time to react (13%) Of those who chose D, reasons include*: • Less confusing design (34%) • Better visibility and alertness (16%) 37
  38. 38. Now, compare your preference from A/B to your preference from C/D. Which would you prefer to ride through on a bicycle? A B C D A (Mixing zone design): 6% B (Lateral shift design): 10% C (Protected intersection design): 73% D (Bend-in design) 11% 38
  39. 39. “Bike Inclined” • Feel that destinations were within bikeable distances • Not deterred by traffic • Saw people like them riding in their neighborhoods • Most likely to bike for transport Cluster Groupings Exploring “types of cyclists” “Bike Inclined” “Interested but Concerned” • Feel that destinations were within bikeable distances • Not deterred by traffic • Saw people like them riding in their neighborhoods • Most likely to bike for transport • Interested in biking more • Traffic keeps them from riding more • More likely to be female K-Means Cluster Analysis, based on attitudes and perceptions toward bicycling “Bike Inclined” “Interested but Concerned” “Indifferent to Bicycling” • Feel that destinations were within bikeable distances • Not deterred by traffic • Saw people like them riding in their neighborhoods • Most likely to bike for transport • Interested in biking more • Traffic keeps them from riding more • More likely to be female • Less interested in bicycling • Don’t view destinations as bikeable • Don’t see people like themselves riding in their neighborhood. • Least likely to have ridden a bike for transport or have a transit pass • Most likely to take most trips by car. 39
  40. 40. Percentage Comfortable by Design Type 30% 32% 52% 60% 65% 61% 37% 31% 35% 39% 61% Indifferent to Bicycling 47% 59% 64% 68% 83% 73% 49% 42% 50% 45% 72% Mixing zone Lateral Shift Bend in Maintain separation Protected Intersection Signal Bike Inclined 32% 30% 46% 51% 71% 66% 26% 24% 33% 25% 60% Interested but Concerned
  41. 41. Simulation Modeling 41
  42. 42. Observed Turning Speeds (mph) 8.70 10.57 6.59 7.58 8.58 9.38 Bicycles Right-Turn Vehicles Bicycles Right-Turn Vehicles Bicycles Right-Turn Vehicles Speed(miesperhour) Bend-in Bend-out Mixing Zone 42
  43. 43. Right- turning volume (veh/hr) Bicycle volume (veh/hr) 25 50 75 100 150 200 50 100 150 200 250 Microsimulation • 10 calibrated runs for each volume combination. • Challenges with yielding/priority interactions of bicycles and vehicles. • Signal timing not varied. • “Conflicts” extracted using FHWA’s SSAM tool from simulated trajectories. 43 Mixing Zone Bend Out / Protected Bend In
  44. 44. Number of simulated conflicts per hour (mixing zone design) Right-turning volume (veh/hr) Bicycle volume (veh/hr) 25 50 75 100 150 200 50 0.3 1 2.2 2.6 3 4.9 100 1.5 3.1 5.4 5.6 8.3 13.9 150 3.1 3.9 6.8 8.1 12.4 16.4 200 3.2 5.8 9.2 9.9 15.9 24.8 250 2.3 7.3 10.7 15.4 20.8 32.5 44
  45. 45. 0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 0.25 0.30 0.35 50 100 150 200 250 NumberofConflicts/Bicycle Right-turning volume (veh/hr), Bicycle volume = 100 veh/hr Mixing Zone Bend In Bend Out 0.00 1.00 2.00 3.00 4.00 5.00 6.00 7.00 8.00 9.00 50 100 150 200 250 AverageMaximumSpeed(m/s) Right-turning Vehicle Volume Mixing Zone Bend In Bend Out 45
  46. 46. Contextual Guidance 46
  47. 47. Weighted Comfort Scores CTV =No vehicle interaction (turn visible) Comfort Scores, by typology CN =With vehicle interaction b-S= Number of bicycles with no vehicle interaction Estimated Interactions, Bicycle Volume=b S=Number of bicycles with vehicle interaction * * 𝐶𝐶𝐶𝐶𝑡𝑡,𝑏𝑏 = 𝑆𝑆 ∗ 𝐶𝐶𝑁𝑁 + 𝑏𝑏 − 𝑆𝑆 ∗ 𝐶𝐶𝑇𝑇𝑇𝑇 𝑏𝑏 47
  48. 48. Percent Comfortable, Interested but Concerned Percent Comfortable Mixing zone Lateral Shift Bend in Maintain separation Signal Protected Int Turn visible 32% 30% 46% 51% 65% 71% Interaction 26% 24% 33% 25% 60% By right- turning volumes 50 32% 30% 45% 50% 65% 70% 100 32% 30% 45% 49% 65% 70% 150 31% 29% 45% 49% 65% 69% 200 31% 29% 44% 48% 65% 68% 250 31% 29% 44% 48% 65% 67% 48
  49. 49. Some Limitations • Research did not study the safety of design options (either in terms of reported crashes or other surrogate measures). • We were not able to differentiate the aspects of the designs in determining the mean comfort scores (such as the length of the mix-merge length or the offsets for the bend in or bend outs). • Based context of designs in videos. • Microsimulation not yet completely validated as tool to replicate reality for bicycle-vehicle interactions. Estimated conflicts should not be extended beyond their purpose in this research. 49
  50. 50. Conclusions 50
  51. 51. Conclusions (1) • Separation matters: • Protected intersections and bike signals were found to provide the best expected rider comfort. • Designs that keep a separate bike lane (bend-in, straight-path) were rated as comfortable by more than half of all respondents but were sensitive to the presence of turning vehicles. • Designs that move bicyclists and motor vehicles into shared space (mixing zones or lateral shifts) were viewed as least comfortable. • Exposure distance is a significant predictor of comfort. Shortening exposure distance is a good design objective. 51
  52. 52. Conclusions (2) • “Interested but Concerned” • As found in past research finding, this group tends to be the most responsive to changes in the design environments. • Less than 30% of would feel comfortable with any form of mixing before the intersection. • However, about 67% would feel comfortable at a bike signal and protected intersection. • “Riding with children” • Responses provide valuable insights but should be interpreted with caution as they are each based on a single video clip, without any interaction with a turning vehicle. 52
  53. 53. Other resources 53
  54. 54. Acknowledgements This project was funded by a pooled fund organized by the National Institute for Transportation and Communities (NITC) grant number NITC- RR-987. Pooled fund contributors include the Portland Bureau of Transportation, the City of Cambridge, Massachusetts, SRAM Cycling Fund, and TriMet. Project Team PSU: Chris Monsere, Nathan McNeil, Yi Wang TDG: Rebecca Sanders, Rob Burchfield and Bill Schultheiss 54
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