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17TSC Safer Transportation for Every Pedestrian (STEP)

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Presenter: Peter Eun, FHWA Resource Center

Published in: Education
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17TSC Safer Transportation for Every Pedestrian (STEP)

  1. 1. 1 Transportation and Communities Summit Portland, OR September 11, 2017
  2. 2. Too many People Dying 2 How many Pedestrians did not make it safely across the roadway in the United States? 0.00 0.02 0.04 0.06 0.08 0.10 0.12 0.14 0.16 0.18 3,600 3,800 4,000 4,200 4,400 4,600 4,800 5,000 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 PedestrianFatalityRate Per100,000Population PedestrianFatalities Pedestrian Pedestrian Fatality Rate Data Source: FARS
  3. 3. 4 National Data • Over 66% of pedestrian fatalities occur at non- intersection locations • Roughly 16% of pedestrian fatalities occur at uncontrolled intersections
  4. 4. 5 STEP 1: Does our agency want to get pedestrians safely across the road? STEP 2: What type of roadways are people trying to cross? STEP 3: Which enhancement(s) should be selected? Goal: Empowering People to Improve Their Lives
  5. 5. 6 STEP 1: Does our agency want to get pedestrians safely across the road?
  6. 6. 7
  7. 7. 8 STEP 1: Does our agency want to get pedestrians safely across the road? STEP 2: What type of roadways are people trying to cross?
  8. 8. 9 MUTCD States New marked crosswalks alone, without other measures designed to reduce traffic speeds, shorten crossing distances, enhance driver awareness of the crossing, and/or provide active warning of pedestrian presence, should not be installed across uncontrolled roadways where the speed limit exceeds 40 mph and/or either: • Has 4 or more lanes without a raised median or island and ADT of 12,000 or more, or • 4 or more lanes with raised median island and ADT of 15,000 or more • (2009 MUTCD Section 3B.18)
  9. 9. 10 STEP 1: Does our agency want to get pedestrians safely across the road? STEP 2: What type of roadways are people trying to cross? STEP 3: Which enhancement(s) should be selected? “reduce traffic speeds, shorten crossing distances, enhance driver awareness of the crossing, and/or provide active warning of pedestrian presence”
  10. 10. Crosswalk Visibility Enhancements High Visibility Crosswalk What Pedestrians See What Drivers See Photo Source all 4: Michael Ronkin
  11. 11. Crosswalk Visibility Enhancements Signs & Lighting 12 Tampa FL Photo source: Youtube screen capture SWARCO
  12. 12. Raised Crosswalks Photo Source: SRTS Guide Photo Source: Seattle.gov Crosswalks
  13. 13. 14 Pedestrian Refuge Island: Breaks up complex crossing into 2 simpler ones
  14. 14. Pedestrian Hybrid Beacons (PHB) 1 Blank for drivers 2 Flashing yellow Steady yellow 3 4 Steady red Wig-Wag 5 Return to 1
  15. 15. Road Diet / Roadway Reconfiguration • Reduce crossing distance • Eliminate /reduce “multiple threat” crash types • Install crossing island to cross in 2 simple steps • Reduce top end travel speeds • Buffer sidewalk from travel lanes (parking or bike lane) • Reclaim street space for “higher and better use” than moving peak hour traffic
  16. 16. Road Diet Informational Guide & Road Diet Case Studies 17 https://safety.fhwa.dot.gov/road_diets/ https://www.fhwa.dot.gov/innovation/everydaycounts/edc-3/roaddiets.cfm
  17. 17. 18 STEP 1: Does our agency want to get pedestrians safely across the road? STEP 2: What type of roadways are people trying to cross? STEP 3: Which enhancement(s) should be selected? Goal: Empowering People to Improve Their Lives
  18. 18. Technical Assistance 19 • STEP Workshops • Road Safety Audits • Guidance with Data Analysis • Developing Plans • Other Technical Assistance
  19. 19. STEP CO-Lead 20 Peter Eun • FHWA Resource Center Safety & Design TST • Located: Olympia WA • Transportation Safety Engineer • peter.eun@dot.gov • 360-328-3044

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