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17TCS Bang for the Buck: How states and MPOs are striving to be more accountable and transparent

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Moderator: Rob Zako, University of Oregon Speakers: Roger Millar, Washington State Department of Transportation; Tammy Baney, Oregon Transportation Commission; James Corless, Sacramento Area Council of Governments

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17TCS Bang for the Buck: How states and MPOs are striving to be more accountable and transparent

  1. 1. Agenda: •  Introduc)on of session and panelists (5 minutes) •  Opening (10 minutes) •  Defini)ons (10 minutes) •  Goals (10 minutes) •  Decision-Making (10 minutes) •  Evalua)on (10 minutes) •  Challenges (10 minutes) •  Audience Q&A (20 minutes) •  Closing (5 minutes) ------ Session Descrip1on: Federal, state and local governments spend roughly 5 percent of their total expenditures on transporta)on: roads, bridges, tunnels, public transit, ports, etc. But how can the public be confident that such investments are delivering value: providing beQer access, strengthening the economy, promo)ng public health, suppor)ng livable communi)es, and advancing other goals the public has been promised and expects? This panel will summarizes the efforts of several states and MPOs striving to be more accountable and transparent to the public. hQp://trec.pdx.edu/summit/summit_day 1
  2. 2. Let’s begin with some big picture context. Federal, state and local governments spend roughly 5 percent of their total expenditures on transporta)on: roads, bridges, tunnels, public transit, ports, etc. In 2012 (the last year for which good data is available from the Bureau of Transporta)on Sta)s)cs), governments spent a total of $320 billion on transporta)on. Almost two thirds of this total was spent on highways and other roads, bridges and tunnels. Another 17% goes to transit. ------ Source: Bureau of Transporta)on Sta)s)cs, Transporta)on Sta)s)cs Annual Report 2015, table 5-5 (2016). hQp://www.rita.dot.gov/bts/sites/rita.dot.gov.bts/files/publica)ons/ transporta)on_sta)s)cs_annual_report/2015/index.html 2 3/21/17
  3. 3. The public provide inputs in the form of various taxes and fees they pay. These revenues fund various kinds of outputs: the construc)on, opera)on and maintenance of transporta)on facili)es and services. But these outputs are not ends in themselves but rather means to mul)ple outcomes the public hopes or expects their taxes will buy. 3
  4. 4. How can the public be confident that such investments are delivering value: providing beQer access, strengthening the economy, promo)ng public health, suppor)ng livable communi)es, and advancing other goals the public has been promised and expects? 4
  5. 5. To help answer this ques)on, we have assembled a panel of high-level prac))oners from the three West Coast States to provide us with some case studies: James Corless is the CEO of the Sacramento Council of Governments (SACOG), one of the “big four” metropolitan planning organiza)ons (MPOs) in California. Tammy Baney is the chair of the Oregon Transporta)on Commission, a 5-member body that oversees the Oregon Department of Transporta)on. Roger Millar is the Washington State Secretary of Transporta)on, in charge of a state agency with 6,800 employees. And I, Rob Zako, am a research associa)on with the Sustainable Ci)es Ini)a)ve at the University of Oregon, and am just finishing up a na)onal look aQhe effec)veness of transporta)on investments in achieving livability and other goals. In truth, all four of us do or have worn mul)ple hats and bring mul)ple perspec)ve to this discussion. Roger has 38 years experience in the transporta)on arena, having worked in the public, private and nonprofit sectors. Tammy is a county commissioner and comes to transporta)on with a passion for public health issues. James un)l recently was the founding execu)ve director of Transporta)on for America, a na)onal alliance working for smart transporta)on solu)ons to local problems. 5
  6. 6. Opening: Each panelist provides an introduc)on to his state / MPO (3 minutes each, 10 minutes total) Defini1ons: What are we talking about? Why is it important? Goals: What is the measure of success? What does the public expect? 6
  7. 7. Decision-Making: How are planning and programming decisions made? Evalua1on: How effec)ve are transporta)on investments? How do we know? 7
  8. 8. Challenges: In an ideal world, we we would have accountability and transparency in transporta)on decision-making. In the real world, doing so is hard. Q&A: General ques)ons from the audience. Closing: Final remarks from each panelist. 8
  9. 9. ------ Source: Caltrans, Caltrans Program Review: Final Report (January 28, 2014). hQp://www.dot.ca.gov/docs/Program_Review_Final_Report_Jan_2014.pdf hQp://www.dot.ca.gov/ctcip/ 9
  10. 10. ------ Source: Caltrans, Director’s Video (8/20/2014). hQps://www.youtube.com/watch? v=7V77rsxlQPg&feature=youtu.be&list=PLCA823EA9A1199AA0 hQp://www.dot.ca.gov/ctcip/ 10
  11. 11. ------ Source: Metropolitan Transporta)on Commission, Plan Bay Area 2040: Performance Assessment Report (July 2017). hQp://2040.planbayarea.org/sites/default/files/2017-07/ Performance%20Assessment%20Report_PBA2040_7-2017_0.pdf hQp://www.2040.planbayarea.org/reports See also: hQp://bayareametro.github.io/performance/dashboard/ 11
  12. 12. ------ Source: Oregon Department of Transporta)on, HB Bill 2017-10: A brief overview (2017). hQps://olis.leg.state.or.us/liz/2017R1/Downloads/CommiQeeMee)ngDocument/ 137371 12
  13. 13. ------ Source: HB 2017 Implementa)on (presenta)on to Oregon Transporta)on Commission on July 20, 2017). hQp://www.oregon.gov/ODOT/Get-Involved/OTCSupportMaterials/ Agenda_D_HB_2017_Implementa)on_PPT.pdf hQp://www.oregon.gov/ODOT/Get-Involved/Pages/OTC_Main.aspx 13
  14. 14. ------ Source: HB 2017 Implementa)on (presenta)on to Oregon Transporta)on Commission on July 20, 2017). hQp://www.oregon.gov/ODOT/Get-Involved/OTCSupportMaterials/ Agenda_D_HB_2017_Implementa)on_PPT.pdf hQp://www.oregon.gov/ODOT/Get-Involved/Pages/OTC_Main.aspx 14
  15. 15. ------ Source: Results Washington, Goal 2: Prosperous Economy. hQp://www.results.wa.gov/sites/default/files/GoalMaps/G2ResultsWAGoalMap.pdf hQp://www.results.wa.gov/what-we-do/measure-results/prosperous-economy/goal- map 15
  16. 16. ------ Source: Washington State Department of Transporta)on, Results WSDOT – Our Strategic Plan. hQp://wsdot.wa.gov/publica)ons/fulltext/secretary/WSDOTStrategicPlan.pdf?v=2 hQp://wsdot.wa.gov/about/secretary/results-wsdot 16
  17. 17. ------ Source: Washington State Department of Transporta)on, Gray Notebook Lite, no 66 (June 2017). hQp://wsdot.wa.gov/publica)ons/fulltext/graynotebook/Lite_Jun17.pdf hQp://wsdot.wa.gov/Accountability/GrayNotebook/navigateGNB.htm 17
  18. 18. Highlight about-to-be published report and toolkit. Effec)veness of Transporta)on Funding Mechanisms for Achieving Na)onal, State, and Metropolitan Economic, Health, and Other Livability Goals. ------ Source: Toolkit: Rob Zako & Rebecca Lewis, BeQer Outcomes: Improving Accountability & Transparency in Transporta)on Decision-Making (2017). Research Report: Rebecca Lewis, Robert Zako, Alexis Biddle & Rory Isbell. Effec)veness of Transporta)on Funding Mechanisms for Achieving Na)onal, State, and Metropolitan Economic, Health, and Other Livability Goals (2017). hQp://nitc.trec.pdx.edu/research/project/875/ 18

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