The Justice Summit: The Metropolitan Community Project

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http://www.justiceprojectcontinues.org/summit/Breakout

Session #3: Inclusive Schools and Education Equity

What does it mean to be a welcoming school district within the constraints of segregated housing patterns? What can suburban residents do to effect change in a metropolitan system that sanctions separate and unequal educational opportunities? Does diversity in schools create a net gain for all?
- Joaquin Stephenson, Students Organized Against Racism (SOAR) of District 219
- Dan Lawler and Spiro Bolos, New Trier's Metropolitan Community Project
- Steve Bogira, The Chicago Reader
- Kourtney Cockrell, Student Enrichment Services at Northwestern University

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The Justice Summit: The Metropolitan Community Project

  1. 1. What is the Metropolitan Community Project? The Justice Summit: October 11th, 2015
  2. 2. What is the Metropolitan Community Project?
  3. 3. What is the Metropolitan Community Project?
  4. 4. What is the Metropolitan Community Project?
  5. 5. Illinois State Constitution • A fundamental goal of the People of the State is the educational development of all persons to the limits of their capacities. • The State shall provide for an efficient system of high quality public educational institutions and services. • The State has the primary responsibility for financing the system of public education.
  6. 6. How are Illinois schools funded?
  7. 7. School Spending per student, per year New Trier Township H.S. $21,372 CPS high schools $13,791
  8. 8. Courses / Academic Programs / Extracurriculars What do the differences in school funding mean?
  9. 9. Strong Teaching / Leadership / Support Staff / Services What do the differences in school funding mean?
  10. 10. What do the differences in school funding mean? School facilities: Physical environment / Type and design of facilities
  11. 11. What do the differences in school funding mean? Technology / Instructional materials
  12. 12. Where does the money come from?
  13. 13. So how do we end up with these extreme differences in school funding? Property Taxes
  14. 14. Winnetka ● Higher property values ● More $ raised through school property taxes. Logan Square ● Lower property values ● Less $ raised through school property taxes.
  15. 15. Lower-income areas often have higher school property tax rates, but less school funding. New Trier H.S. District 1.67% school tax rate / $100 Chicago Public Schools 2.58% school tax rate / $100
  16. 16. Illinois Ranks Near the Bottom (47th place) in STATE Contribution to K-12 Public Education Funding
  17. 17. • Illinois sets a “foundation level” for school funding. • The state guarantees that a school’s funds will not fall below this level… Guess how much it is?
  18. 18. $6,119 Remember that New Trier spends over $21,000 per student per year
  19. 19. What could fix disparities in school funding? Some ideas… • Raise the state’s foundation level for school funding • Make school funding less reliant on property taxes • Implement a progressive state income tax • Implement a “needs-based” funding system
  20. 20. Who could fix disparities in school funding?
  21. 21. Who could fix disparities in school funding? The State Legislature
  22. 22. SB001: School Funding Reform Act 2015 No additional state money for education • Illinois ranks 47 out of 50 in the portion of education funded by the state • Estimated $5 billion short in adequate education funding • SB1 does nothing to address this shortfall
  23. 23. What we can do to influence the debate • Create a “student-based” funding bill based on actual student needs • Design and advocate for an Illinois “Student Bill of Rights”
  24. 24. 159%

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