FIRSTFare 2012 Pneumatics for Beginners

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FIRSTFare 2012 Pneumatics for Beginners

  1. 1. Dale Yocum, Head Mentor, Team 1540 The Flaming Chickens dale@yocum.com Based on presentation from Tim Bennington-Davis, Team 1425 Error Code Zero
  2. 2. Why Use Pneumatics ? Powerful, reliable, durable Applying constant force Linear motion
  3. 3. Typical ApplicationsGrabbersand Arms
  4. 4. Typical ApplicationsAppendagesand brakes
  5. 5. Typical ApplicationsShifting
  6. 6. What will it cost you? Weight Battery power Space on the robot Logistics to get the right parts
  7. 7. Pneumatic SystemCompressor Air Tanks Regulators and gauges Regulator Pressure Gauge, pressure switch, release valve Solenoid valves Solenoid Actuators
  8. 8. Compressor New model in 2011 – lighter, less air Earlier model also legal (probably) Mount with rubber mounts to solid surface Power with Spike (replace fuse with 20A circuit interrupter)
  9. 9. Safety Relief Valve  Releases at 120 psi – prevents over- pressure condition. Adjust it!  Must be placed on high-pressure side (prior to regulator)  Must mount on compressor
  10. 10. Air Tanks  Reservoir for pressurized air  May use more than one  Typically used on high-pressure side
  11. 11. Gauges and Regulators  Norgren regulator mandatory, regulates high pressure side down to 60 psi  Must have gauge on high pressure side, and on low-pressure side  Look for the arrow on regulator!
  12. 12. Pressure switch  Switch opens around 115 psi, closes at 95 in theory. You can’t adjust it.  Must be connected to digital input on digital sidecar – NOT in series with power
  13. 13. Release Valve Releases air from the system Must be in an obvious place
  14. 14. Solenoid Valves  Driven by pneumatic bumper on cRIO  Available in single- and double-action  Use 12v Valves
  15. 15. Tubing  Must have clear pressure marking  Typically 0.25” OD  Always cut with tubing cutter, square end  Freelin-Wade.com Polyurethane Polyethylene Coiled
  16. 16. Actuators  Typical device is a linear ram  Available in many sizes  Length (throw)  Diameter (bore)  Mounting configurations  3 cylinders are available at no cost but you must order them
  17. 17. Flow control  Flow control valves  Mount at air inlet on actuators or in-line  Control speed of action, not force
  18. 18. Fittings www.automationdirect.com
  19. 19. Helpful Hints
  20. 20. Tradeoffs  Big cylinders use more air (stroke and bore)  Frequent use of air during match can outrun your compressor  If your air use is limited, you can consider charging tanks in the pit, and not mounting compressor  Save weight, cost and battery power
  21. 21. Pneumatics CommandmentsThou shalt… Not tolerate air leaks. Not cut pneumatic tubing with anything other than a pneumatics tubing cutter. Not use a actuator bigger than you need. Tape metal fittings up to but not including the last thread. Optimize air storage capacity.
  22. 22. Summary  Well-suited for:  Fast movement  Two-position mechanisms  Creating substantial force  Sustained Holding  Not so good for  Precision position control  Sustained movement
  23. 23. Great resources FIRST website  Pneumatics Manual  Rules from 2012 http://team358.org/files/pneumatic/

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