LEVERAGING THE ROMAN II ASSET MANAGEMENT SYSTEM                                         Damien DouglasAsset Management Eng...
The Rollout So Far                                Data Views and ManipulationAt the time of writing, the rollout of the   ...
Routine maintenance costs;                  time loading data and more time on analysing                                  ...
one which is available for use in the dTIMS       Figure 2 is a thematic map of the formermodelling software component of ...
and to analyse the following interventions to       ROMAN II Work Selection Tool (WST). Thisdetermine their likely effect ...
Levels of Service                                  ConclusionA fundamental question to consider in asset        The ROMAN ...
and Runways, Christchurch, NZ, 1-4 May2005.International  Infrastructure    ManagementManual (2006). International Edition...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Leveraging the ROMAN II Asset Management System

734 views

Published on

Western Australia is currently rolling out a replacement system for the management of road assets, known as ROMAN II. The package includes RAMM, the software used throughout New Zealand to manage road assets; dTIMS, the internationally renowned predictive modelling tool; as well as a full support and training arrangement. It will replace the previous ROMAN pavement management system used by the majority of WA Local Governments.

There are many different ways to view and manipulate the information stored within the ROMAN II system. This paper will briefly review the ROMAN II system, the implementation phase of the project and then present several case studies that demonstrate the potential of the system for housing a wide range of asset information, such as inventory, condition and risk ratings.

Further ways to maximise the potential of the system and how it could, and should, fit into the wider asset management picture of local government will be a key theme of the paper and ROMAN II’s place in the asset management cycle will be examined. This also includes looking at ways to make the best use of ROMAN II for the benefit of stakeholders (levels of service, etc) and to meet the organisation’s asset management goals.

Published in: Business, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
734
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Leveraging the ROMAN II Asset Management System

  1. 1. LEVERAGING THE ROMAN II ASSET MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Damien DouglasAsset Management Engineer, Opus International Consultants (PCA) Pty Ltd, Perth, WA, AustraliaAbstractWestern Australia is currently rolling out a replacement system for the management of road assets,known as ROMAN II. The package includes RAMM, the software used throughout New Zealand tomanage road assets; dTIMS, the internationally renowned predictive modelling tool; as well as afull support and training arrangement. It will replace the previous ROMAN pavement managementsystem used by the majority of WA Local Governments.There are many different ways to view and manipulate the information stored within the ROMAN IIsystem. This paper will briefly review the ROMAN II system, the implementation phase of theproject and then present several case studies that demonstrate the potential of the system forhousing a wide range of asset information, such as inventory, condition and risk ratings.Further ways to maximise the potential of the system and how it could, and should, fit into thewider asset management picture of local government will be a key theme of the paper and ROMANII’s place in the asset management cycle will be examined. This also includes looking at ways tomake the best use of ROMAN II for the benefit of stakeholders (levels of service, etc) and to meetthe organisation’s asset management goals.Key Words: ROMAN II asset management system, maximise potential, leverageopportunities dTIMS performance modellingIntroduction software delivered by Deighton Associates Ltd of Canada;ROMAN II is the new road assetmanagement system that has been Provision of customised deteriorationdeveloped for use in Western Australia. It has models by ARRB Group Ltd;been adopted by the vast majority of Local User support and helpdeskGovernments with only a handful opting to assistance; anduse an alternative system. Training services.The project to replace the previous ROMANpavement management system was initiated Opus International Consultants (Opus) haveby the Western Australian Local Government provided impartial advice and project supportAssociation (WALGA) with the support of to WALGA since 2007 through theMain Roads Western Australia (MRWA) and procurement, negotiation and developmentthe Institute of Public Works Engineering phases of the ROMAN II project. The authorAustralia (IPWEA). In 2009 an agreement has been part of the Opus project supportwas signed with ARRB Group Ltd to deliver a team since mid-2010 and has been involvedROMAN II package including: in testing the ROMAN II system during the development phase. He has also given RAMM (Road Assessment and advice to WALGA, and to Local Governments Maintenance Management) asset on their behalf. management software delivered by RAMM Software Ltd of New Zealand;
  2. 2. The Rollout So Far Data Views and ManipulationAt the time of writing, the rollout of the One of the key advantages of using aROMAN II system to Local Government commercially available asset managementsubscribers was due to commence in a system such as ROMAN II is the wide varietymatter of weeks. The intention was to deliver of data viewing options.a RAMM database to each LocalGovernment, translated from their previous The main RAMM application allows users toROMAN database, through a Perth-based view each asset type in a grid view or ahosting service or as a standalone version to detailed view. These are two simple ways tobe installed on the organisation’s own view a number of different assets at once orcomputer system. Read-only access would to focus on a particular asset in detail. Forbe granted to subscribed users until their example, a user could view a grid of all signsinitial training had been provided. that are located on a particular road, on a selection of roads, or by applying a filter onInitial training was planned for approximately any number of fields. Filters are a powerful30 separate groups of Local Government way of managing data for the everyday user.users across Western Australia. This trainingwas to cover the basics of using RAMM as There is a third option available in the mainpart of the ROMAN II system, including application that allows users to display theviewing and summarising data, loading data assets in a map view alongside other layersand using the reporting tools. of information such as cadastre. The spatial viewing of data is becoming more common and the benefits of visualising data in thisInformed Decision Making way are substantial. For example, using appropriate filters you can view the locationROMAN II will provide huge benefits to Local of all the sections of road that are rougherGovernments in Western Australia simply by than a defined threshold.assisting them to better inform their assetmanagement decision making. ROMAN II also provides tools, such as the RAMM SQL application, that help optimiseCollectively, subscribers to ROMAN II are in the adaptability of asset data for a variety ofa unique position, having been delivered a purposes. The RAMM SQL application allowspowerful, common system to manage their the user to write their own SQL (Structuredroad assets without having to commit huge Query Language) script to manipulate dataresources to sourcing and developing it. This for their specific requirements. This givesshould allow Local Governments to more advanced users an opportunity toconcentrate their resources on realising summarise data in different ways to thosepotential benefits to their asset management provided by the core application. Forpractices. example, when assessing sites for deficiencies you are able to summarise theThe commonality of the system could also condition indicators that are relevant to yourpotentially be an issue should ROMAN II not organisation’s levels of service.meet an organisation’s specific requirements.To address this issue, the ROMAN II project Many useful condition indicators are alreadyteam have considered feedback from users summarised within RAMM against treatmentand worked towards an outcome where the length sections. However, it is often useful tosystem should meet most Local look closer at some data in ways that areGovernments requirements. Additionally, it is different to the default summarisation processa system that is scalable to their needs. and in line with an individual organisation’s drivers. Examples of data that could be summarised against sections of road in this way, provided it is populated in the database, are:
  3. 3. Routine maintenance costs; time loading data and more time on analysing and using it. Condition data (including roughness, macrotexture, skid resistance, visual Some examples that demonstrate the rating, etc); potential of using asset data in innovative Number and type of accidents; ways, are discussed below. Surfacing/pavement type and age; In the first example, street light asset data Valuation data; was used to determine areas of a road network where lighting was inadequate. This Predictive modelling results; and was possible because of the extent of data Planned work. that can be stored about street lights in the ROMAN II system. The structure used in RAMM to define street lights is based onMaximise Potential three core components of a pole, a bracket and a light. Each pole has a unique ID,There are many features available in the location, purpose, owner, material andROMAN II system that have not previously dimensions. Each bracket must be connectedbeen commonly available to Western to a pole and has a unique ID, type, outreachAustralian Local Governments. Firstly, using distance, angle, etc. Each light is thenRAMM software there is a far greater connected to a bracket and has a unique ID,opportunity to store information about a wider manufacturer, gear type, lamp, etc.array of assets associated with a roadnetwork than was previously possible in Using this information it was possible toROMAN. Specifically, users are able to store determine the theoretical illuminance,detailed inventory, condition, risk and measured in lux, across a road network usingvaluation information about assets such as ArcGIS software.bridges, retaining walls and street lights.However, the way to maximise the potentialof the system is not just to populate it withinformation. It is more about how theinformation is used as part of anorganisation’s asset management regime.Typically, there will be many common waysof using the asset data populated in RAMMthat have previously been onerous or timeconsuming with the old ROMAN system. Asimple time-saver is the ability to bulk load or Figure 1: Street Light Illuminance Plotupdate data into RAMM. For example, in thepast when users were loading visual Plotted spatially, in Figure 1, the illuminancecondition rating data it usually had to be of the street lights on a portion of the roadmanually entered into a ROMAN data entry network was able to be presented clearly totemplate. In RAMM the same data can be an audience and be used to determinebulk loaded using the import function in the sections of the road network that were notRAMM Manager application from a adequately illuminated.spreadsheet or other accepted file format.This method involves a number of validation A second example of innovative uses of roadsteps to ensure the quality of the data being asset data is the development of aloaded. Alternatively, data can also be programme of sites for collection of fallingmanipulated and updated using SQL for weight deflectometer (FWD) data. This datathose users with adequate SQL ability. This is is commonly used to calculate the strength ofjust one example where users can spend less pavements which is an important input into pavement performance models, such as the
  4. 4. one which is available for use in the dTIMS Figure 2 is a thematic map of the formermodelling software component of ROMAN II. Franklin District, in New Zealand, which shows the geology of the district and theROMAN II allows organisations to store their pavement strength of its road network. UsingFWD data in a table in RAMM. RAMM also maps such as this one, created usingincludes a pavement strength calculation tool geographic information systems (GIS), it isthat utilises the FWD data in its calculations. possible to perform analysis on the available strength data for the network. Strength data,As RAMM also allows the storage of traffic including that gathered using the methodand pavement loading data in one of its explained earlier in the example, andtables, this creates an opportunity to work to geological data can be linked to makedefine useful samples of sites to capture assumptions about the strength of otherstrength information for. Using pavement age pavements in a network.data and pavement loading data it is possibleto divide a road network up into separate As alluded to, pavement strength data is anequivalent bins. Specifically, the cumulative important input into pavement performanceequivalent standard axles (ESA) for each modelling. Therefore, this type of informationsection of road would be calculated from should be a key focus for Local Governmentdesign guides using the current life of the organisations wishing to make use of thepavement, and a back calculation of AADT powerful dTIMS tool available as part ofand percentage of heavy vehicles. A ROMAN II.representative sample can then be sought byapplying a weighting to the percentage of A third example highlights the burgeoningroad sections in each bin that have not had importance of asset data as an input intoFWD testing carried out. Commonly it is road safety initiatives.found that higher-trafficked newer roads havea higher proportion of strength data available, Davies, Cenek and Henderson (2005) havehence this method would often help shift the described a method of combining detailedfocus to collecting data on older pavements. information on road geometry (horizontal curvature, gradient and cross-fall), roadOnce the appropriate bins to target have surface condition (roughness, rut depth,been identified, sections of road can be texture depth and skid resistance),selected for FWD testing by ordering them in carriageway characteristics (region,terms of their heavy vehicle percentage and urban/rural environment and traffic flow) andtheir length. Efficiencies can be gained by crashes. Their study was made possible dueignoring road sections of shorter length (i.e. to geometry and surface condition data thatless than 300 metres). had been collected on New Zealand state highways, and subsequently stored in RAMM, since 1997. The data sources described were able to be statistically modelled, enabling crash rates to be compared with road characteristics. This resulted in the development of a crash prediction model that could be used to predict the expected number of crashes per year on sections of road. The crash prediction model has subsequently been used to analyse the performance of an 18.2km length of state highway that travels through the Karangahake Gorge between the towns of Paeroa and Waihi in New Zealand. The model was used to compare predictedFigure 2: Franklin Network Pavement Strength crash densities with actual crash densities,
  5. 5. and to analyse the following interventions to ROMAN II Work Selection Tool (WST). Thisdetermine their likely effect on crash tool can be utilised to optimise decisionsreduction: curve realignment; surface about the sections of road where treatmentstreatment to improve skid resistance; and are to be performed. The WST uses a scriptsurface treatment to improve ride quality which defines the rules and logic used to(Cenek & Davies, 2006). This road safety analyse the available condition data. A list ofimprovement study won Opus a Silver Award treatments will be recommended under aof Excellence at the Association of Consulting scenario, which can be compared withEngineers New Zealand (ACENZ) annual alternative scenarios using differentInnovate NZ awards in 2009, acknowledging parameters. These parameters includeoutstanding technical innovation and service intervention criteria, variables and treatmentto the client (NZ Transport Agency). costs. A chosen scenario can be constrained to a budget and determine treatments based on a prioritisation method.The Asset Management Cycle It is also clear the system will be beneficial toAsset data and information systems are an any Local Government that is intent onimportant part of the total asset management progressing towards an advanced level ofprocess. It is impossible to implement asset management as defined in theworthwhile asset management solutions International Infrastructure Managementwithout adequate knowledge of your assets Manual (2006). In particular, the dTIMSand their performance. component lends itself to long-term, whole of life, cost, risk and performance optimisation.This leads to an acknowledgement that asset If the ROMAN II system has been integratedmanagement information systems play a into the organisation’s overall IT structure,significant role in the asset management there is no reason why an iterative process ofcycle. A system such as ROMAN II will be an continuous improvement cannot utilise theimportant building block for future system to great effect. Accurate and detailedimprovement in asset management asset data will support efforts to produce risk-processes in Local Government based strategies and appropriate use oforganisations in Western Australia. predictive methods to make optimised decisions.ROMAN II is a system that is easily capableof providing the necessary tools for asset For any organisation, selecting anmanagement at a core level as defined in the appropriate asset management level mayInternational Infrastructure Management come down to a number of factors. ManyManual (2006). The manual states that Local Governments in Western Australia maypractices undertaken at a core level should be content with reaching a core level. Thisinclude: identification of critical assets; asset decision could depend on their ownregisters; condition/performance data; ratepayers’ expectations and how theseoptimised decision making; and levels of expectations relate to the size, condition andservice based on historical information. The complexity of the Local Government’s assets.RAMM software component allows users tostore the minimum required data fields about Whatever the level may be, it is important totheir assets or to populate a vast array of gain commitment from throughout thedetail. organisation. There is limited value in attempting to implement an assetOne example of the detail available is the management improvement programmeability to store risk and condition ratings unless there is a strong commitmentagainst individual assets. Knowing the corporately and from the staff who are goingcondition of assets is important to their to implement it.ongoing management and a key input intothe development of forward worksprogrammes. Pavement condition data storedin RAMM is available to be used in the
  6. 6. Levels of Service ConclusionA fundamental question to consider in asset The ROMAN II road asset managementmanagement is how can you measure the system provides a genuine opportunity forperformance of your assets if you haven’t Western Australian Local Governmentdefined their level of service? organisations to progress their asset management practices. ROMAN II provides aIn considering levels of service we also need multitude of ways to work with asset data.to understand if we are getting value for Through a number of data views and othermoney and optimising the whole of life cycle manipulative procedures, such as filtering orcosts of the asset. SQL queries, it is possible to summarise data to meet an organisation’s specific needs andLevels of service are based upon customer inform their asset management processes.expectations, legislative requirements and an There are also many new features that wereorganisation’s objectives. Defining levels of not available in the previous ROMAN system.service allows a Local Government to inform Organisations can store detailed inventory,customers of the level of service being condition, risk and valuation informationoffered to them, develop strategies around about a far greater range of assets found inthe required level of service, measure their road corridors.performance, identify costs and benefits ofparticular services, and enables customers to The key to maximising the system’s potentialassess for themselves the suitability of the is how the information is used as part of anservices provided (International Infrastructure organisation’s asset management regime.Management Manual, 2006). However, Using ROMAN II it is now possible to savebefore setting levels of service it is important time on the menial tasks and focus on higherto know what the current levels of service level analysis. For example, users can focusbeing delivered actually are. on analysing the illuminance of street lights, the strength of pavement sections or roadROMAN II can clearly store and analyse safety risks. A system such as ROMAN II willinformation on asset ownership, physical be a building block for future improvements incondition, performance, utilisation, failure asset management processes in Localmodes, treatment rankings, works Government organisations in Westernrationalisation and optimisation. Using this Australia.information it is possible to determine thecurrent level of service being provided to ROMAN II is not only highly capable ofcustomers (i.e. ratepayers) in terms of a supporting the needs of organisations whovariety of technical levels of service or wish to have a core level of assetperformance measures. Some of this management; it also lends itself to theinformation has been highlighted in the case progression towards an advanced level.study examples given.Typically technical levels of service won’t be Referencessuitable to use for consultation as they wouldnot be easily understood by the majority of Cenek, P.D. and Davies, R.B. (2006).customers. Therefore, technical levels of “Modelling and Analysis of Crash Densitiesservice are predominantly for the use of for Karangahake Gorge, New Zealand”,internal management and to provide Australasian Road Safety, Policing andmeasurable targets. As previously described, Education Conference, Surfers Paradise,ROMAN II provides a possible source for Queensland, Australia, 25-27 October 2006.much of the information needed to measurethese technical levels of service or Davies, R.B., Cenek, P.D. and Henderson,performance measures. R.J. (2005). “The Effect of Skid Resistance and Texture on Crash Risk”, International Conference on Surface Friction for Roads
  7. 7. and Runways, Christchurch, NZ, 1-4 May2005.International Infrastructure ManagementManual (2006). International Edition 2006.Author BiographyDamien is an Asset Management Engineerbased in the Perth office of OpusInternational Consultants. He started hiscareer with Opus in New Zealand and hasexperience managing road asset informationon behalf of a number of New Zealand andWestern Australian local governments.Damien’s pavement performance modellingexperience using dTIMS, and intimateknowledge of RAMM, have allowed him tomaximise the power of the ROMAN II systemin WA. He has also assisted the ROMAN IIproject team during testing and advised anumber of local governments on datarequirements.Contact Details:PO Box 174Osborne ParkWA 6917Australiadamien.douglas@opus.com.au

×