BOLD MOVES TOWARDS A LOW CARBON CITY November 2009 Presentation by Romel Pascual,  Acting Deputy Mayor,  Energy & Environm...
Los Angeles The footprint of the City of Los Angeles can accommodate 7 major American cities and Manhattan Island The city...
WE ARE A CITY KNOWN FOR Traffic & Sprawl
LA’S EMISSIONS PROFILE <ul><li>One-third of citywide emissions stem from municipal government activities. </li></ul><ul><l...
OUR COMMITMENT TO GREENING L.A. IS BOLD Our fight against global warming frames our work <ul><li>Released May 2007 </li></...
Owning and Operating Assets Los Angeles World Airports Port of Los Angeles Department of Water and Power
Renewable Energy <ul><ul><li>LA’s renewable portfolio increased from 3% in 2005 to over 14% in renewable energy capacity t...
GREENING THE PORTS
Green Building First mandatory private sector green building law for any city over 1 million people  Requires all private ...
Transportation Largest alt fuel refuse collection fleet in the country 100% of all DASH buses are alt-fuel 99% of MTA buse...
Building a Green Economy  <ul><li>Good policies:   </li></ul><ul><li>Policies whose primary goal is environmental, but tha...
THE LOS ANGELES CLEANTECH CORRIDOR Cornfields-Arroyo Seco Plan <ul><li>Innovative specific plan </li></ul><ul><li>Communit...
Innovation LA: A harbor cluster built around maritime transportation-related Cleantech Funded 1 st  Hybrid Assist Tug Fund...
SOLAR LA: AS A CATALYST FOR GREEN JOBS AND BUSINESSES <ul><li>SOLAR COMPANIES </li></ul><ul><li>Attract and grow  solar R&...
LED STREET  LIGHT PROGRAM 140,000 Street Lights $57 Million Project Pays Back in 7 years $10 Million in Energy  Savings Pe...
 
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Romel Pasqual, Deputy Mayor, City of LA at Opportunity Green 2009

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Romel Pasqual, Deputy Mayor, City of LA at Opportunity Green 2009

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  • In 1990, the entire city’s carbon emissions were more than that of the country of Sweden. But we are making a impact…we saw a 4.6% reduction between 1990 and 2004. Primarily due to more efficient auto engine standards, and energy conservation efforts. One-third of the entire city’s carbon emissions stem from municipal (city government-related) activity. That number includes all city operations that we own and operate (including the emission profile from our utility operations)
  • For the Port…we have developed the first ever Clean Air Action Plan that will reduce air emissions, SOX, NOX and diesel PM by more than 45% by 2011. We have a clean-truck program that will target the 16,000 trucks that call on the port. We have lower emissions from ships using both low sulfur fuel and cold-iroining.’ll increase cold-ironing (ship electrifying by plugging in while on dock to run there systems, instead of using the diesel fuel.). 10 Megawatt Solar Power Project will be built at the Port that will generate 10 megawatts , the equivalent of taking more than 1600 cars off the road and will power 984 households Clean Air Action Plan meets the Mayor’s goal of 35% below 1990 levels. this will be done through projects related to: Heavy-Duty Vehicles/Trucks (HDV); Ocean-Going Vessels (OGV); Cargo Handling Equipment (CHE); Harbor Craft (HC); Railroad Locomotives (RL)
  • Green Building 1. public buildings Since 2003 require all city’s new buildings over 7,500 sq ft to achieve LEED certification Have completed 16 buildings/received certification (10 certified; 3 Silver; 2 Gold; 1 Platinum) Nearly 1.5 million square feet Nearly $1 Billion in design and construction costs Animal shelters, fire and police facilities, libraries, rec centers, municipal facilities (neighborhood city halls) 2. private sector green building ordinance Passed by Council and signed by Mayor on April 22nd this past spring. 3 parts: Green Building Team – first time a cross-departmental team has been created by ordinance Standard of Sustainability – requirement Standard of Sustainable Excellence – voluntary + incentives
  • Green Building 1. public buildings Since 2003 require all city’s new buildings over 7,500 sq ft to achieve LEED certification Have completed 16 buildings/received certification (10 certified; 3 Silver; 2 Gold; 1 Platinum) Nearly 1.5 million square feet Nearly $1 Billion in design and construction costs Animal shelters, fire and police facilities, libraries, rec centers, municipal facilities (neighborhood city halls) 2. private sector green building ordinance Passed by Council and signed by Mayor on April 22nd this past spring. 3 parts: Green Building Team – first time a cross-departmental team has been created by ordinance Standard of Sustainability – requirement Standard of Sustainable Excellence – voluntary + incentives
  • Romel Pasqual, Deputy Mayor, City of LA at Opportunity Green 2009

    1. 1. BOLD MOVES TOWARDS A LOW CARBON CITY November 2009 Presentation by Romel Pascual, Acting Deputy Mayor, Energy & Environment City of Los Angeles The City of Los Angeles – Mayor Antonio R. Villaraigosa
    2. 2. Los Angeles The footprint of the City of Los Angeles can accommodate 7 major American cities and Manhattan Island The city= 470 square miles or 1217.3 square kilometers Home to more than 4 million people The City’s carbon emissions – 54 million metric tons
    3. 3. WE ARE A CITY KNOWN FOR Traffic & Sprawl
    4. 4. LA’S EMISSIONS PROFILE <ul><li>One-third of citywide emissions stem from municipal government activities. </li></ul><ul><li>By 2004, we saw a 4.6% reduction from 1990 levels. </li></ul><ul><li>As of October 2008, we are 7% below 1990 levels </li></ul>
    5. 5. OUR COMMITMENT TO GREENING L.A. IS BOLD Our fight against global warming frames our work <ul><li>Released May 2007 </li></ul><ul><li>Goal: 35% below 1990 GHG emission levels by 2030. </li></ul><ul><li>Contains over 50 actions we all have to do. </li></ul>THE MAYOR’S GREENLA PLAN – Climate Action Plan
    6. 6. Owning and Operating Assets Los Angeles World Airports Port of Los Angeles Department of Water and Power
    7. 7. Renewable Energy <ul><ul><li>LA’s renewable portfolio increased from 3% in 2005 to over 14% in renewable energy capacity today. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2009: SolarLA Plan – 1280 Megawatt Solar Plan for Los Angeles </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2009: LARGEST municipally owned and operated Wind Farm 120MW in the country (Pine Tree), and more projects to come on line by December (Millford) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2007: the City broke ground on the Terminal Island Renewable Energy Project – Biomass project </li></ul></ul>COAL- FREE by 2020 Mayor’s Goal: 20% Renewable Energy by 2010 40% Renewable Energy by 2020
    8. 8. GREENING THE PORTS
    9. 9. Green Building First mandatory private sector green building law for any city over 1 million people Requires all private buildings over 50,000 square feet and/or 50 units to meet a “standard of sustainability” similar to the LEED standards Green Building program offers both commercial and residential green building incentives <ul><li>All new city public buildings over 7,500 sq. feet must achieve LEED certification </li></ul><ul><li>51 LEED certified public buildings constructed or being designed and built in LA </li></ul><ul><li>First LEED platinum and gold public libraries in the U.S. </li></ul><ul><li>Convention Center is a LEED EB </li></ul>
    10. 10. Transportation Largest alt fuel refuse collection fleet in the country 100% of all DASH buses are alt-fuel 99% of MTA buses are CNG ATSAC implemented at 3,300 of 4,300 City of Los Angeles signalized intersections Full Implementation will reduce almost 1 Million Metric Tons of CO2
    11. 11. Building a Green Economy <ul><li>Good policies: </li></ul><ul><li>Policies whose primary goal is environmental, but that can be leveraged to help build the green economy. </li></ul><ul><li>Selective investment : </li></ul><ul><li>Investment in local clean technology firms that help the city develop needed environmental solutions. </li></ul><ul><li>Acting as a “platform” or testing for new technologies : </li></ul><ul><li>The city is a powerful partner for testing new technologies at scale—a key part of the development process. </li></ul><ul><li>Purchasing, procurement & incentives: </li></ul><ul><li>Leveraging the City’s purchasing power to create local green jobs and industry. </li></ul><ul><li>Creative land use : </li></ul><ul><li>Repositioning industrial land for the jobs of the future. </li></ul><ul><li>Partnerships and Promotion/advocacy of the LA region : </li></ul>
    12. 12. THE LOS ANGELES CLEANTECH CORRIDOR Cornfields-Arroyo Seco Plan <ul><li>Innovative specific plan </li></ul><ul><li>Community will be to LEED Neighborhood Development (ND) </li></ul><ul><li>Will support cleantech and R&D uses </li></ul>Clean Tech Manufacturing Center <ul><li>20.6 acre site </li></ul><ul><li>CRA/LA-owned </li></ul><ul><li>Develop into a cleantech site with anchor tenant, ancillary uses, and incubator or training facility </li></ul>DWP Clean Technology Research Center <ul><li>6 acre site </li></ul><ul><li>DWP will build “green” building with lab and office space </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on research and development of cutting-edge alternative energy technologies </li></ul><ul><li>Home to SCI-Arc and people in the creative industries </li></ul><ul><li>Converted lofts could provide housing stock for cleantech sector </li></ul>Live-Work Arts District
    13. 13. Innovation LA: A harbor cluster built around maritime transportation-related Cleantech Funded 1 st Hybrid Assist Tug Funded 1st REGEN Flywheel for Rubber Tired Gantry Cranes Funded 1st Electric Drayage Truck Next: Evaluating market-ready zero emissions conveyance systems. Ready to invest $1M <ul><li>Leverages billions in spending on Port’s ambitious environmental initiatives </li></ul><ul><li>Leverages $15M TAP Investment Fund </li></ul><ul><li>Partner with regulatory agencies and other investors </li></ul><ul><li>Port co-invests in promising technologies, helps with testing, potentially first customer </li></ul><ul><li>Manufacturing space provided for selected firms </li></ul><ul><li>Stimulate job growth in the local economy </li></ul>
    14. 14. SOLAR LA: AS A CATALYST FOR GREEN JOBS AND BUSINESSES <ul><li>SOLAR COMPANIES </li></ul><ul><li>Attract and grow solar R&D, manufacturing, distribution, and construction companies </li></ul><ul><li>Leverage federal, state, local and financial incentives packages, rebates and subsidies, promotional power rates, preferences for local firms </li></ul><ul><li>SOLAR INOVATION CLUSTER </li></ul><ul><li>Become the most aggressive and progressive solar city in America </li></ul><ul><li>Develop partnerships with LADWP and local research universities, laboratories and clean technology firms </li></ul><ul><li>Promote R&D, testing and commercialization of innovative technologies, and the deployment of clean technology solutions </li></ul><ul><li>GREEN COLLAR JOBS </li></ul><ul><li>LADWP will develop partnerships with local schools and innovative organizations including community colleges, IBEW, and local vocational schools and programs to provide assistance and technical support for standardized curricula, instructor training, and link graduates from these programs to employers developing solar projects in L.A. </li></ul>
    15. 15. LED STREET LIGHT PROGRAM 140,000 Street Lights $57 Million Project Pays Back in 7 years $10 Million in Energy Savings Per Year 40,500 MT of CO2 Reduced

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