OpenStack Compute - Juno Updates

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Michael Still, Compute PTL, outlines the changes made in the Icehouse release as well as upcoming updates for Juno.

Learn more about Compute (Nova) here: https://wiki.openstack.org/wiki/Nova

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OpenStack Compute - Juno Updates

  1. 1. OpenStack Compute PTL Michael Still OpenStack Compute in Juno
  2. 2. What is OpenStack Compute?
  3. 3. Themes for Icehouse? ● Better CI will result in a more reliable experience for operators ● Work towards live upgrade ● Cleanups of our APIs to make them easier to use
  4. 4. Where did we end up in Icehouse? ● 65 blueprints implemented, 652 bugs fixed ● 293 developers submitted at least one patch ● 42 developers had at least ten patches
  5. 5. Where did we end up in Icehouse? ● Limited live upgrades ● Upgrade controllers and set: [upgrade_levels] compute=icehouse-compat ● Then upgrade compute nodes slowly ● Unset: [upgrade_levels] compute=icehouse-compat
  6. 6. Where did we end up in Icehouse? ● API ● There was a lot of work on a v3 API in Icehouse, but API users should remember this work is still considered experimental ● You can now permanently remove decommissioned compute nodes ● XML support was deprecated in Icehouse, and will be removed soon. This should be transparent to most users.
  7. 7. Where did we end up in Icehouse? ● Other ● File injection is now disabled by default, use metadata server or config drive instead ● Hypervisor driver specific flags have been moved into groups related to the relevant driver to make the flag namespace less confusing ● There was an experimental Docker driver which has moved from nova to stackforge in this release ● The PowerVM driver has been removed at IBM’s request
  8. 8. Themes for Juno? ● Continued improvements to our CI systems ● Work towards live upgrade ● The experimental v3 API becoming a series of microversions on top of our current v2 API
  9. 9. Where are we going in Juno? ● New specifications process ● A formal document which defines what is being implemented ● Which is reviewed separately from the code ● Operators encouraged to participate ● We still have a large number of specifications under review ● A summary of currently approved specifications: ● https://wiki.openstack.org/wiki/Nova/Juno-Specs
  10. 10. Where are we going in Juno? ● Further work on live upgrades ● We want to be able to support live upgrades, but in order to do this we need to move to an internal object model with versioned objects. This is a lot of work, but is underway.
  11. 11. Where are we going in Juno? ● API ● The v3 API will be presented as a series of microversions to v2 instead of a completely new API. The first of these microversions will be a v2.1 with stricter type checking. ● Clients will negotiate which microversions they support with the API servers, so backwards compatibility is maintained. ● Better support for cross project request ids is under way ● Better tagging support in EC2
  12. 12. Where are we going in Juno? ● Scheduler ● There is work underway to allow us to split out the scheduler into its own service that other projects can use as well. We need to rearrange a fair bit of code to enable this though.
  13. 13. Where are we going in Juno? ● SQL Database ● Support for DB2 as a SQL database is proposed.
  14. 14. Where are we going in Juno? ● libvirt driver ● Support for starting LXC containers from a block device ● Use of libvirt storage pools ● NFV enabling features, including: ● PCI-SRIOV passthrough support ● NUMA aware scheduling
  15. 15. Where are we going in Juno? ● vmware driver ● Refactoring of driver code to make it more maintainable ● Support for: ● hot plug network interfaces ● ephemeral disks ● vSAN data stores ● booting OVA images
  16. 16. Questions?

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