Thatcamp2011 intro to-cm_ses

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Thatcamp2011 intro to-cm_ses

  1. 1. Introduction to CMSesWordPress, Omeka, and Drupal<br />Patrick Murray-John & Raf Alvarado<br />THATCamp / CHNM<br />June 3-5 2011<br />
  2. 2. In general, if you can use WordPress, then you should use WordPress<br />
  3. 3.
  4. 4. What is a Content Model?<br />Mediates between the data model of the database and the emergent information architecture of the site.<br />Allows site builders to represent and organize content -- e.g. source material in the form of images, text, and metadata.<br />Content is complex -- media objects (e.g. image and detail, book and page), technical metadata, semantic metadata ...<br />
  5. 5. Each CMS has a set of content modeling affordances based on . . .<br />Elementary units e.g. pages, nodes<br />Connective devices e.g. tagss, categories<br />Display methods e.g. widgets, feeds<br /> Combined, these produce emergent patterns<br />
  6. 6. Simple Hypertext<br />PAGES<br /> . . . have LINKS<br />No displaydevices per se<br />Examples:<br />HTML and<br />Wikis …<br />From Nelson’s Computer Lib/Dream Machines<br />
  7. 7. WordPress<br />PAGES<br />Subpages  Fly-out menus, menu widgets <br />POSTS<br /> Tags  Tag widgets, list pages<br /> Categories  Category widget, list pages<br />Content is accessed by browsing, menus, and widgets<br />
  8. 8. Results in “Dendritic Hypertext”<br />Image taken from Shirky’s “Ontology is Overrated”<br />
  9. 9. Content Modeling in WP<br />WordPress – map pages, pages, categories,and tags onto content domain<br />E.g. Courses<br />Pages = Syllabus items<br />Posts = Lesson resources<br />Categories = Course Schedule<br />Tags = Resource subject and format<br />
  10. 10. Omeka has Items<br />ITEMS <br />COLLECTIONs<br /> DC metadata<br />Keywords <br /> Tags  Browsable list pages<br />Content is accessed by Browsing and EXHIBITS<br />
  11. 11. Results in “Axial Hypertext”<br />Image taken from Landow’sHypertext<br />
  12. 12. Drupal<br />NODES<br />Menu paths  Menus, blocks<br /> Arbitrary fields Views<br />Node references  Linked Views, backrefs<br />Taxonomies  List pages, Views<br />Outlines  Books<br />Content is accessed by Browsing, Views, Books, Panels, and other devices<br />
  13. 13. Drupal Content Models are like Relational Models<br />Each link represents a “node reference”<br />
  14. 14. Results in “Rhizomic Hypertext”<br />
  15. 15. Detail view of a node and associated node references<br />
  16. 16. Content Model for Lived Theology Project<br />
  17. 17. Content Model for Nursing History Project<br />
  18. 18. Summary before looking at examples<br />
  19. 19.
  20. 20.
  21. 21. Some Salient Differences<br />Specific vs. General content modeling<br />WordPress is general<br />Manual vs. Automatic site organization<br />Omeka is manual<br />Paradigmatic vs. Syntagmatic affordances<br />Drupal is highly paradigmatic<br />
  22. 22.
  23. 23. Use Cases<br />WordPress<br />Course sites, personal portfolios, blogs (of course)<br />Omeka<br />Exhibits, simple thematic research collections<br />Drupal<br />Collaborative projects, complex thematic research collections, data meshing<br />
  24. 24. Example Drupal Sites<br /> House Divided<br /> Lived Theology<br /> Nursing History<br /> Cultural Landscapes<br />MediaBase<br />

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