Information Technology for Facilities Management

530 views

Published on

One of the lectures I've delivered to MSc students in the field of Intelligent Buildings

http://omerio.com

Published in: Technology, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
530
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
31
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Many people use the terms Internet and World Wide Web (aka. the Web) interchangeably, but in fact the two terms are not synonymous. The Internet and the Web are two separate but related things.What is The Internet?The Internet is a massive network of networks, a networking infrastructure. It connects millions of computers together globally, forming a network in which any computer can communicate with any other computer as long as they are both connected to the Internet. Information that travels over the Internet does so via a variety of languages known asprotocols.
    What is The Web (World Wide Web)?The World Wide Web, or simply Web, is a way of accessing information over the medium of the Internet. It is an information-sharing model that is built on top of the Internet. The Web uses the HTTP protocol, only one of the languages spoken over the Internet, to transmit data. Web services, which use HTTP to allow applications to communicate in order to exchange business logic, use the the Web to share information. The Web also utilizesbrowsers, such as Internet Explorer or Firefox, to access Web documents called Web pages that are linked to each other via hyperlinks. Web documents also contain graphics, sounds, text and video.
    The Web is just one of the ways that information can be disseminated over the Internet. The Internet, not the Web, is also used for e-mail, which relies on SMTP, Usenet news groups, instant messaging and FTP. So the Web is just a portion of the Internet, albeit a large portion, but the two terms are not synonymous and should not be confused.  
  • A hype cycle is a graphic representation of the maturity, adoption and business application of specific technologies. The term was coined by Gartner,[1] an analyst/research house based in the United States that provides opinions, advice and data on the global information technology industry.
    Five phases
    A hype cycle in Gartner's interpretation comprises five phases:
    "Technology Trigger" — The first phase of a hype cycle is the "technology trigger" or breakthrough, product launch or other event that generates significant press and interest.
    "Peak of Inflated Expectations" — In the next phase, a frenzy of publicity typically generates over-enthusiasm and unrealistic expectations. There may be some successful applications of a technology, but there are typically more failures.
    "Trough of Disillusionment" — Technologies enter the "trough of disillusionment" because they fail to meet expectations and quickly become unfashionable. Consequently, the press usually abandons the topic and the technology.
    "Slope of Enlightenment" — Although the press may have stopped covering the technology, some businesses continue through the "slope of enlightenment" and experiment to understand the benefits and practical application of the technology.
    "Plateau of Productivity" — A technology reaches the "plateau of productivity" as the benefits of it become widely demonstrated and accepted. The technology becomes increasingly stable and evolves in second and third generations. The final height of the plateau varies according to whether the technology is broadly applicable or benefits only a niche market.
    The term is now used more broadly in the marketing of new technologies.
  • A hype cycle is a graphic representation of the maturity, adoption and business application of specific technologies. The term was coined by Gartner,[1] an analyst/research house based in the United States that provides opinions, advice and data on the global information technology industry.
    Five phases
    A hype cycle in Gartner's interpretation comprises five phases:
    "Technology Trigger" — The first phase of a hype cycle is the "technology trigger" or breakthrough, product launch or other event that generates significant press and interest.
    "Peak of Inflated Expectations" — In the next phase, a frenzy of publicity typically generates over-enthusiasm and unrealistic expectations. There may be some successful applications of a technology, but there are typically more failures.
    "Trough of Disillusionment" — Technologies enter the "trough of disillusionment" because they fail to meet expectations and quickly become unfashionable. Consequently, the press usually abandons the topic and the technology.
    "Slope of Enlightenment" — Although the press may have stopped covering the technology, some businesses continue through the "slope of enlightenment" and experiment to understand the benefits and practical application of the technology.
    "Plateau of Productivity" — A technology reaches the "plateau of productivity" as the benefits of it become widely demonstrated and accepted. The technology becomes increasingly stable and evolves in second and third generations. The final height of the plateau varies according to whether the technology is broadly applicable or benefits only a niche market.
    The term is now used more broadly in the marketing of new technologies.
  • Information Technology for Facilities Management

    1. 1. Omer Dawelbeit, iNetria Ltd. omer.dawelbeit@inetria.co.uk Ltd. © 2010 http://www.inetria.co.uk/
    2. 2. Why use Technology in FM          Efficient collaboration between the participants in the FM function. Automated facility monitoring. More efficient space utilization. Improved project planning. Fast and accurate reporting. Streamlined and improved processes. Improved disaster planning capabilities. Data standardization across the organisation. Integration with existing systems and processes.
    3. 3. What is collaboration technology  A combination of technologies that together create a single shared interface between two or more interested individuals (people), enabling them to participate in a creative process in which they share their collective skills, expertise, understanding of knowledge (information), and thereby jointly deliver the best solution that meets their common goal(s). [Wilkinson 2005]
    4. 4. The need for FM collaboration technology  Information sharing is not easy without the technology. Adapted from [Wilkinson 2005]
    5. 5. The need for FM collaboration technology  The technology offers a more efficient and less complex way to manage communications. Adapted from [Wilkinson 2005]
    6. 6. Total Facilities Management IS Platforms The Challenges  Difficulty of integrating FM IS platforms with existing enterprise (finance systems) and other intelligent facilities systems.  The complexity of developing an FM IS system that interfaces with diverse systems such as:  Computer Aided Facilities Management (CAFM) systems.  Computer Aided Design (CAD) systems.  Building Information Models (BIM).  Computerized Maintenance Management System.
    7. 7. Total Facilities Management IS Platforms The Challenges  Collaborators represent fundamentally different professions who hold different goals, objectives, and even beliefs.  Difficulty of supporting data exchange, information sharing and interoperability between the various contractors and participants in the FM function.  Not all the FM requirements can be incorporated in one platform.  Majority of FM software providers are not keeping pace with the latest technologies.
    8. 8. The enabler for collaboration & Integration  The Internet is a worldwide, publicly accessible series of interconnected computer networks that transmit data by packet switching using the Internet Protocol (IP).  It is a "network of networks" that consists of millions of smaller domestic, academic, business, and government networks.  Carry various information and services, such as electronic mail, online chat, file transfer, videos, voice, web pages and other resources of the World Wide Web (WWW). The Internet Source The Opte project http://www.opte.org/maps/ The Internet Source http://www.telegeography.com
    9. 9. The Internet Evolution cn on e c t www Applications Hosting Internet t oc nn ce
    10. 10. Standalone Applications No or very limited Collaboration or Integration Capability
    11. 11. Client-Server Applications
    12. 12. Client-Server Applications Advantages:  Thick client user interface provides the richness, interactivity and responsiveness required by the users  Fast access to the applications as they are available on the local machine  Users can still continue to use the applications even if there is an outage on the network Disadvantages  Cost involved in developing applications that work on different OS (Operating Systems) and hardware.  Cost involved in maintaining the distributed applications and rolling out patches & updates.
    13. 13. Web Applications
    14. 14. Web Applications Advantages:  Access to the framework can be done using any PC with a web browser and Internet / Intranet access. It is even possible to access the framework using PDAs or mobile devices from sites.  Web application is lightweight rich, responsive and interactive.  No updates or software installs are required on the client PCs  Maintaining the application server and the user interface is easy as it is centralized. Disadvantages:  Centralised web / application server means any outages will impact all users, however this can be overcome with a backup server, which comes to action if the main server goes down
    15. 15. Web 2.0  Web 2.0 is the network as platform, spanning all connected devices; Web 2.0 applications are those that make the most of the intrinsic advantages of that platform: delivering software as a continually-updated service that gets better the more people use it, consuming and remixing data from multiple sources, including individual users, while providing their own data and services in a form that allows remixing by others, creating network effects through an "architecture of participation," and going beyond the page metaphor of Web 1.0 to deliver rich user experiences.[O'Reilly 2005] Source http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_2.0
    16. 16. Duality of the Web Source: http://www.jjg.net/ia/ Jesse James Garrett
    17. 17. Rich Internet Applications (RIAs)  RIAs were born out of Web 2.0 concepts and the evolution of traditional Web applications.  RIAs are web applications that have the features and functionality of traditional desktop applications.  RIAs typically run in a web browser, or do not require software installation Source [Dawelbeit 2008] Source [http://www.fsi.co.uk/digital-dashboard-mid-32.html]
    18. 18. Types of RIAs
    19. 19. Ajax Based RIAs Ajax (Asynchronous JavaScript and XML) isn’t a technology. It’s really several technologies, each flourishing in its own right, coming together in powerful new ways. Ajax incorporates DHTML, XHTML, CSS, JavaScript, DOM
    20. 20. Advantages of RIAs      Usability – Rich GUI Flexibility – MDI Multi-tasking Interactivity – Instant feedback Offline mode support. Responsiveness – Timely response to user’s actions • 0.1 second is about the limit for having the user feel that the system is reacting instantaneously • 1.0 second is about the limit for the user's flow of thought to stay uninterrupted • 10 seconds is about the limit for keeping the user's attention focused on the dialogue.
    21. 21. Internet Hosting & Computing  Shared and dedicated server hosting have been around since the late 1990s.  Software as a service (SaaS) a model of software deployment whereby a provider licenses an application to customers for use as a service on demand has emerged and gained momentum in 2001.  Cloud Computing a style of computing in which dynamically scalable and often virtualised resources are provided as a service over the Internet has emerged in 2008.  Cloud Computing utilizes many concepts such as SaaS, virtual and utility computing and seems to be the future.  Provider include Amazon Web Service, Google App Engine, Microsoft Azure, SalesForce.com.
    22. 22. Internet Connectivity  Internet connectivity and infrastructure have greatly evolved in the past few years from narrow band dial up access to fixed and mobile broadband access.  IPv6, Gigabit Ethernet (LAN), fibre optics and radio telecoms (WAN) have advanced greatly.  Consumer and business Internet access has moved towards broadband connectivity  In the UK the following speeds are available to both businesses and consumers: • Cable Broadband through Cable TV – up to 20Mbit/s • DSL through phone line – up to 24Mbit/s • Mobile broadband through 3G – up to 7.2Mbit/s
    23. 23. Technology Hype Cycle  New technologies are over hyped by the media and businesses.  A hype cycle is a graphic representation of the maturity, adoption and business application of specific technologies. Source http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hype_cycle
    24. 24. Technology Hype Cycle - 2006 Source http://www.gartner.com/
    25. 25. Technology Hype Cycle - 2007 Source http://www.gartner.com/
    26. 26. Technology Hype Cycle - 2008 Source http://www.gartner.com/
    27. 27. Technology Hype Cycle - 2009 Source http://www.gartner.com/
    28. 28. The Future  Semantic Web (sometimes referred to as Web 3.0) the meaning of data can be discovered by computers. This envisaged data web would allow software (e.g. intelligent agents) to find, process and associate data from across the web to accomplish user goals.  The Semantic Web offers new opportunities for the next generation of collaborative applications: it provides a novel means to classify information items i.e. by means of ontologies which formally represent the consensual understanding of the application users w.r.t. a particular domain of interest. Taking advantage of this technology, the first promising implementations of Semantic Web-based collaboration platforms such as Semantic Web portals, semantic Wikis and blogs, to name only a few, have been proposed. [http://stoc.agnbi.de/]
    29. 29. References  Atkin, B. & Brooks, A. (2009). Total Facilities Management. 3rd ed. Blackwell Publishing.  Dawelbeit, O. (2008). Development of Rich Internet Application for Office Management System. MSc Dissertation at University of Reading. URL: http://dawelbeit.info/development-of-rich-internet-application-for-office-man http://dawelbeit.info/development-of-rich-internet-application-for-office-ma  Garrett, J. J. (2002). The Elements of User Experience: User Centered Design for the Web. New Riders Press.  Sun, M. & Howard, R. (2004). Understanding I.T. in Construction. Spon Press, Taylor & Francis.  Wilkinson, P. (2005). Construction Collaboration Technologies the Extranet Evolution. Taylor & Francis.
    30. 30. Thank you for listening Questions??

    ×