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What Really Happened with War on Drugs?

The war on drugs has taken a massive cost in human lives, making the US the world’s largest prison population, but drugs remain widely available and treatment resources are insufficient. The US government spent trillions of dollars incarcerating non-violent drug offenders that pose barriers to employment and stability.

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What Really Happened with War on Drugs?

  1. 1. HOW MUCH MONEY HAS BEEN SPENT BY THE US IN 40 YEARS?
  2. 2. $ To lock those people up in federal prisons Other costs: an overburdened justice system, a strained health care system, lost productivity, and environmental destruction 215 billion To fight the drug gangs in their home countries 20 billion 450 billion In marketing "Just Say No"-style messages to America's youth and other prevention programs 33 billion Law enforcement along America’s borders 49 billion To arrest more than 37 million nonviolent drug offenders 121 billion 1 Trillion ($1,000,000,000,0000) Since first declared in 1970 by President Nixon, the United States' war on drugs has cost $1 trillion and hundreds of thousands of lives.
  3. 3. HOW MUCH MONEY HAS BEEN SPENT BY THE US IN 40 YEARS?
  4. 4. 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 1971 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 billion billion billion billion billion billion billion billion billion billion 0.1 6.3 7.5 7.6 9.6 10.5 9.8 10.7 11.2 12 12.8 13.1 13.8 13.3 15.3 15 15.6 The first drug-fighting budget was $100 MILLION. The proposed budget for fiscal year 2011 of the Obama Administration was 15.6 billion
  5. 5. HOW HAS THE WAR ON DRUGS CHANGED THE US CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM?
  6. 6. Number of people arrested in 2013 in the U.S. on nonviolent drug charges - the highest incarceration rate in the world 1,574,700 prisoners
  7. 7. More than 1.57 million inmates sat behind bars in federal, state, and county prisons and jails around the country as of December 31, 2013. In the federal prisons, more than half of those sentenced to a stints of a year or longer are still there for drug crimes. Highest Incarceration Rate in the World
  8. 8. In terms of police powers, civil assets forfeitures have been justi- fied to take the drug dealing organizations assets- cash in particular- and use the gains to fund more anti-drug-operations. $ $ $$ $ $ $ $ $$ $ $
  9. 9. Criminal forfeiture occurs after someone is convicted of a crime - the government seizes all property related to that crime (such as a car that was used to commit a robbery or money earned selling drugs). Civil Assets Forfeitures
  10. 10. Number of students who have lost federal financial aid eligibility because of a drug conviction Possesion Sales Drug Abuse 200,000+ students
  11. 11. The nation's drug laws punish students who receive financial aid with drug convictions. After navigating the criminal justice system, these young people then face an enormous barrier when moving forward with their education. Federal grant and loan programs assist millions of students each year that would not otherwise have the opportunity to attend college. Lost of Federal Financial Aid Eligibility
  12. 12. IS THE WAR ON DRUGS SUCCEEDING?
  13. 13. In the US, the war on drugs mostly impacts minority, particularly black, communities. Although black communities aren't more likely to use or sell drugs, African-Americans are 13 times more likely to go to jail for drugs than whites. Is war on drugs racist?
  14. 14. Need of Treatment 70% 80% It is estimated that 70 to 85 percent of the United States’ inmates are in need of substance abuse treatment, which is a far more effective means of handling drug offenders. Public health policies as top priority
  15. 15. Congress has appropriated $2.4 billion to fight the cartels, as partof the security coop- eration agreement between the US and Mexican governments. That money supports a failed war in which tens of thousands have been killed and thousands more tortured. The war in Mexico 100,000+ Number of people killed in Mexico's drug war since 2006
  16. 16. SOURCES http://www.foxnews.com/world/2010/05/13/ap-impact-years-trillion-war-drugs-failed-meet-goals/ http://www.thehouseilivein.org/get-involved/drug-war-today/ http://ssdp.org/assets/2012/07/drug-wars-infographic-600x18601.jpeg http://www.vox.com/cards/war-on-drugs-marijuana-cocaine-heroin-meth/drug-war-law-enforcement -police-militarization-privacy http://www.drugpolicy.org/drug-war-statistics http://drug-war.us/ http://www.alternet.org/drugs/5-nobel-prize-economists-call-end-failed-war-drugs http://billmoyers.com/2015/03/27/can-say-blowback-spanish/ READ OUR BLOG

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