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Paul BentzKevin Cao
Concept Bacteria convert substrate into electrons. The electrons run through the circuit and to power the  load. The by...
Components Anode Cathode Exchange membrane Electrical circuit
Anode The bacteria live in the anode and  convert substrate to carbon dioxide,  water, and energy. Various things like g...
Electrical Circuit After leaving the anode, the electrons travel through  the circuit. These electrons power the load. ...
Exchange Membrane The protons that the bacteria separated  from the electrons flows through the  exchange membrane. They...
Cathode The electrons and protons recombine  at the cathode. Oxygen is reduced to water. A platinum catalyst is used so...
Video
Reactions BEAMR Hydrogen evolution reaction
BEAMR Utilizes electrohydrogenesis, which uses an anaerobic  environment to produce pure hydrogen. It uses about one nin...
Hydrogen Evolution Reaction The bacteria in the anode separate the protons and  electrons. This reaction occurs at the c...
History M.C. Potter first performed work on the concept in 1911  with E. coli at the University of Durham In 1976 the cu...
Operating Conditions Function well in mild conditions Operate at 70-100°F
Uses Beer breweries produce biodegradable  wastewater, which MFCs clean. Desalinating water Creating fertilizer
Environmental Impact If the variety of substrates is increased, waste can be  used to create more energy. Instead of big...
Efficiency The efficiency varies based on the substrate used, but  it can reach very high efficiencies. 91% efficiency h...
Cost   Power density = 150 mW/m2   Volume (MFC): 28 x 10^-6 m3   A/V-ratio: 25 m2/m3   Anode surface area (single cham...
Future More types of substrate Ammonia-treated anodes
Substrate Currently there is a limit to what can be used as a  substrate for the bacteria. Scientists hope to increase t...
Ammonia-Treated Anodes Anodes of MFCs are naturally  negative in charge. The anodes can be changed to a  positive charge...
Bibliography http://www.microbialfuelcell.org/ http://www.engr.psu.edu http://microbialfuelcell.wordpress.com/ http://...
Microbial Fuel Cells
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Microbial Fuel Cells

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A PowerPoint presentation detailing the concept behind Microbial Fuel Cells and analyzing the pros and cons of this technology.

Published in: Technology, Business

Microbial Fuel Cells

  1. 1. Paul BentzKevin Cao
  2. 2. Concept Bacteria convert substrate into electrons. The electrons run through the circuit and to power the load. The byproducts include carbon dioxide, water, and energy.
  3. 3. Components Anode Cathode Exchange membrane Electrical circuit
  4. 4. Anode The bacteria live in the anode and convert substrate to carbon dioxide, water, and energy. Various things like glucose and acetate can be used. The bacteria are kept in an oxygen- less environment to promote the flow of electrons through the anode.
  5. 5. Electrical Circuit After leaving the anode, the electrons travel through the circuit. These electrons power the load. The voltage multiplied by the current shows the power.
  6. 6. Exchange Membrane The protons that the bacteria separated from the electrons flows through the exchange membrane. They recombine on the other side. Can be a proton or cation exchange membrane.
  7. 7. Cathode The electrons and protons recombine at the cathode. Oxygen is reduced to water. A platinum catalyst is used so the oxygen is sufficiently reduced.
  8. 8. Video
  9. 9. Reactions BEAMR Hydrogen evolution reaction
  10. 10. BEAMR Utilizes electrohydrogenesis, which uses an anaerobic environment to produce pure hydrogen. It uses about one ninth of the energy required by normal electrolysis. It has many different names:  Bioelectrochemically assisted microbial reactor  Biocatalyzed electrolysis cells  Microbial electrolysis cells
  11. 11. Hydrogen Evolution Reaction The bacteria in the anode separate the protons and electrons. This reaction occurs at the cathode, where they recombine to form hydrogen gas.
  12. 12. History M.C. Potter first performed work on the concept in 1911 with E. coli at the University of Durham In 1976 the current design was came into existence by the work of Suzuki
  13. 13. Operating Conditions Function well in mild conditions Operate at 70-100°F
  14. 14. Uses Beer breweries produce biodegradable wastewater, which MFCs clean. Desalinating water Creating fertilizer
  15. 15. Environmental Impact If the variety of substrates is increased, waste can be used to create more energy. Instead of big factory manufacturing, fertilizer for farmers can be created with MFCs and common materials. MFCs can be used to desalinate seawater without burning fossil fuels, although not very efficiently yet.
  16. 16. Efficiency The efficiency varies based on the substrate used, but it can reach very high efficiencies. 91% efficiency has been reached.
  17. 17. Cost Power density = 150 mW/m2 Volume (MFC): 28 x 10^-6 m3 A/V-ratio: 25 m2/m3 Anode surface area (single chamber) = 7 x 10^-4 m2 Power = 0.165 mW Cost of single-chamber fuel cell: (lab-scale) Toray paper (10x10 cm): $ 11 XC-72 (10x10 cm): $65 Others (perspex, glue, wire): $ 25 Total = $ 100 Cost per Watt = $ 600/mW
  18. 18. Future More types of substrate Ammonia-treated anodes
  19. 19. Substrate Currently there is a limit to what can be used as a substrate for the bacteria. Scientists hope to increase these fuel types to include things like sewage and manure.
  20. 20. Ammonia-Treated Anodes Anodes of MFCs are naturally negative in charge. The anodes can be changed to a positive charge by being treated with ammonia. This will make the anode more receptive to the electron transfer from the bacteria. The energy trade-off to produce this might not be worth the increase in production.
  21. 21. Bibliography http://www.microbialfuelcell.org/ http://www.engr.psu.edu http://microbialfuelcell.wordpress.com/ http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/01/08010310113 7.htm http://peswiki.com/index.php/Directory:Penn_State_Micr obial_Fuel_Cells_Produce_Hydrogen_from_Waste_Water www.popsci.com/scitech/article/2009-08/microbial-fuel- cell-cleans-wastewater-desalinates-seawater-and- generates-power http://www.fuelcells.org/info/summer2007.pdf

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