13 shape and form

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13 shape and form

  1. 1. Visual Imagination
  2. 2. The terms shape and form are often used, interchangeably, in everyday speech, even in many textbooks. In this class, shape will refer to the “surface definition” of two-dimensional entities, or those entities that have flat surfaces. Shape is, also, the visual counterpart to the conceptual - “plane”. Form will refer to the “surface definition” of three dimensional or voluminous entities, otherwise known as solids.
  3. 3. A square drawn on paper is a shape; a cube is a form.
  4. 4. THERE ARE TWO MAJOR CATEGORIES OF SHAPES AND FORMS: 1. GEOMETRIC 2. ORGANIC Geometric shapes are those made with by mechanical means: straight lines, circles and/or parts of circles -- the shapes you can make with a ruler and a compass.
  5. 5. SOME REGULAR GEOMETRIC SHAPES SOME IRREGULAR GEOMETRIC SHAPES
  6. 6. SOME REGULAR GEOMETRIC FORMS SOME IRREGULAR GEOMETRIC FORMS
  7. 7. Geometric forms can be simple or complex. Think of the inside of a clock or other piece of machinery. Mechanical shapes and forms are often associated with control and order.
  8. 8. COSTUMES CAN DISPLAY GEOMETRIC SHAPES Nathalie Gontcharova – costume Design – “Liturgy”
  9. 9. Rendering Realized Costume Michel Larionof - costume for “Chout” - 1922
  10. 10. … AS WELL AS GEOMETRIC FORMS O. Schlemmer – Bauhaus Costume design -“Triadic Ballet”
  11. 11. … AS CAN SETTINGS Robert Edmund Jones - Macbeth
  12. 12. Organic shapes are shapes found in nature, and the shapes you draw freehand. They are, generally, complex and have a natural, spontaneous feel to them. Think of the enormous variety and complexity of plant and animal life.
  13. 13. Some organic shapes
  14. 14. Shapes and forms have a contour, an outline, or visible limits.* Because of this, they acquire a particular line quality. • Since shapes are two dimensional, they are always viewed frontally and under assigned lighting conditions. Forms, on the other hand, are viewed in given light conditions and against a background and thus acquire an “illusory” contour.
  15. 15. 1. Cube under normal light. Full contour visible. 3. Same cube with color And background contrast removed 2. Same cube with no contrast in the background. Loss of some contour. 4. Same cube with no light. No contour – No form
  16. 16. Actors also have forms.
  17. 17. …as do dancers.
  18. 18. Like organic shapes, organic forms are found in nature – and may be simulated in the production of art and artifact. They can be complex, amorphous (free form) and have a natural, spontaneous feel to them.
  19. 19. Some natural organic forms
  20. 20. SOME MAN MADE ORGANIC FORMS
  21. 21. Because shapes and forms, as inspired by natural models, may be interpreted, they may also be: simplified, complicated, abstracted, stylized or distorted.
  22. 22. Ralph Koltai – Model for set for Don Giovanni Shapes and forms may have both geometric and organic elements.
  23. 23. Forms need not only be opaque. They may be suggested or transparent. Masks for two different productions of Equus.
  24. 24. Similar to lines, shapes and forms can also be expressive, and carry some psychological or emotional weight.
  25. 25. Members of the Nicolais Dance Company using Spandex tubing to create various forms.
  26. 26. Loie Fuller – “Fire Dance” - 1910 Note the expressive quality of form.
  27. 27. Expressive quality of form achieved through the use of mask, costume and movement. Masked figure interpreting Domy Reiter-Soffer’s – “Journey”
  28. 28. Form in costume defining the physical attributes of the character. Laura Crow – costume Warp - 1973
  29. 29. In nature, forms often change or alter with development and maturation. This process of changing from one form to another is often termed metamorphosis, or “morphing” We have seen this change in the development of a butterfly from a caterpillar.
  30. 30. … or the maturation of a frog from a fertilized egg.
  31. 31. In the theatre, performers undergo a kind of metamorphosis, often changing shape as well as personality from actor to character. .. A beard, a latex nose , a little hair, some high and low lights and voila! A new person!
  32. 32. Designers employ morphing techniques to aid in visualizing these incremental changes from one entity to another, or just for fun.
  33. 33. Flip books are morphic in nature, because they show incremental change, in this case, story development.
  34. 34. Another example of morphing.
  35. 35. Computer morphing.

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