In what order did different
fonts develop + from which
cultures?
First ever
font!
The first typeface was
created by Johannes
Gutenberg for his
movable type press.
His font was designed in...
First Roman
Font!
After Johannes’
creation, even
more people
began to create
their own
typefaces.
The next
influential sty...
Now for more common fonts!
1932

Times New
Roman
Serif typeface
It was originally
commissioned by
‘The Times’
newspaper.
Created by Victor
Lardent.
I...
1955

Courier
Monospaced Slab
Serif typeface
Designed by
Howard Kettler in
1955.

“Designed to resemble the output from a ...
Impact

1965

Sans Serif
typeface

The font was created
mainly for headlines
and titles.
Been included on
Microsoft comput...
1982

Arial
Sans Serif
typeface
Created by a
team of 10, lead
by Robin
Nicholas (from
Kent!) and
Patricia
Saunders.
Many d...
1991

Century Gothic
Geometric Sans
Serif typeface
Designed for
Monotype
Imaging in 1991.
The typeface
design is inspired
...
1993

Georgia
Transitional Serif
typeface
Designed by Matthew
Carter for Microsoft!
It was created in
1993. However, it
wa...
1994

Tahoma
Humanist Sans
Serif typeface
Designed by
Matthew Carter
for Microsoft in
1994.
First designed as
a Bitmap fon...
1994

Comic
Sans
Sans Serif
typeface
Designed by
Vincent Connare.
It was released
by Microsoft in
1994.

“Designed to imit...
1996

Verdana
Humanist Sans
Serif typeface
Designed by
Matthew Carter
and released in
1996.
This was another
typeface to b...
Basic structure of type anatomy +
why does it apply?
Anatomy of a typeface…
Understanding type + type anatomy can help greatly when working on a
project.
One of the main things it allows you to do, ...
With thanks to Mr. Wikipedia!
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Typography Presentation - OUGD404

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Typography Presentation - OUGD404

  1. 1. In what order did different fonts develop + from which cultures?
  2. 2. First ever font! The first typeface was created by Johannes Gutenberg for his movable type press. His font was designed in the style of Gothic Blackletter. This was so that books printed by Johannes could still look like the books from around that time which were handwritten instead of printed. This font was created around 1436-50!!
  3. 3. First Roman Font! After Johannes’ creation, even more people began to create their own typefaces. The next influential styles to arrive were ‘Roman’ + ‘Italics’. The first true Roman typeface was created by Nicholas Jenson around 1460!
  4. 4. Now for more common fonts!
  5. 5. 1932 Times New Roman Serif typeface It was originally commissioned by ‘The Times’ newspaper. Created by Victor Lardent. It made its first appearance in The Times on the 3rd of October, 1932. Still used in a lot of printed books today. “One of the most widely used typeface in history!”
  6. 6. 1955 Courier Monospaced Slab Serif typeface Designed by Howard Kettler in 1955. “Designed to resemble the output from a strike-on typewriter” IBM commissioned the design of the original Courier typeface. However, they decided not to copyright protect or secure legal exclusivity of the font.
  7. 7. Impact 1965 Sans Serif typeface The font was created mainly for headlines and titles. Been included on Microsoft computers since ’98. Designed by Geoffrey Lee in 1965. It was released by the ‘Stephenson Blake Foundary’. This font has very thick lettering with very narrow spacing – compressedlooking.
  8. 8. 1982 Arial Sans Serif typeface Created by a team of 10, lead by Robin Nicholas (from Kent!) and Patricia Saunders. Many different styles of this font, e.g.: italic, bold, bold italic… Now known as a ‘system font’. One of the most used typeface families in the world!
  9. 9. 1991 Century Gothic Geometric Sans Serif typeface Designed for Monotype Imaging in 1991. The typeface design is inspired by Sol Hess’s ‘Twentieth Century’ font. However, that was drawn between 1937 and 1947. Century Gothic has been inspired by older font design!
  10. 10. 1993 Georgia Transitional Serif typeface Designed by Matthew Carter for Microsoft! It was created in 1993. However, it wasn’t actually released for a few extra years, in 1996. It was created to look clear at any size on a computer screen. It’s very much like Times New Roman
  11. 11. 1994 Tahoma Humanist Sans Serif typeface Designed by Matthew Carter for Microsoft in 1994. First designed as a Bitmap font. Been used as the default type setting in quite a lot of cases! E.g.: Skype, Windows 2000 + XP
  12. 12. 1994 Comic Sans Sans Serif typeface Designed by Vincent Connare. It was released by Microsoft in 1994. “Designed to imitate the look of comic book lettering” Should only be used in informal work. This typeface has been greatly criticized due to its childlike style!
  13. 13. 1996 Verdana Humanist Sans Serif typeface Designed by Matthew Carter and released in 1996. This was another typeface to be created for Microsoft! Another font to be included in the Microsoft operating system! Designed to be easily readable on computer screens at any size.
  14. 14. Basic structure of type anatomy + why does it apply?
  15. 15. Anatomy of a typeface…
  16. 16. Understanding type + type anatomy can help greatly when working on a project. One of the main things it allows you to do, is pick the most ideal font for the work you’re currently doing. As you know all about the differences in typefaces + the differences these can make to work, you can be very picky with the fonts you choose. “Think about the size + shape of the fonts for each project” (designshack.net) For example: For an organised feel, stick to the baseline rule. If you’re wanting to create disarray + work freely, stray from the baseline rule. “For digital projects, select fonts from the standard set to ensure that your project has the look you intended.” You also have to make sure the typeface is readable. However, if you understand the anatomy rules, it will help you to perfect all these details!
  17. 17. With thanks to Mr. Wikipedia!

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