Connecting Liberal Arts and Business Education: Lesson's Learned from UMD's B.A. in Cultural Entrepreneurship

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In this presentation, we (Olaf Kuhlke and Mike Mullins) would like to share the process and experience of building the B.A. program in Cultural Entrepreneurship at UMD. This new major, starting in Fall 2013, integrates entrepreneurship education traditionally housed in business schools with liberal arts skills, particularly focusing on foreign languages, communication and creative thinking. Cultural entrepreneurship is an emerging academic discipline that examines the economic impact of culture and cultural activities. Scholarship in this realm of study has included the examination of a wide field of activities, including agriculture, agritourism, outdoor recreation, the food and beverage industry, sports, digital media, place marketing, and citizen diplomacy. Cultural entrepreneurship merges education in cultural traditions and heritage with an examination of entrepreneurial principles, as they can be applied to the for-profit and non-profit organization.

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Connecting Liberal Arts and Business Education: Lesson's Learned from UMD's B.A. in Cultural Entrepreneurship

  1. 1. Connecting Liberal Arts and Business Education: Lessons learned from UMD's B.A. in Cultural Entrepreneurship Olaf Kuhlke Associate Dean College of Liberal Arts, UMD Mike Mullins, Instructor of German Department of Foreign Lang. and Lit., UMD
  2. 2. 1. Why a new degree in the Liberal Arts? 1. The status of the Liberal Arts 2. Recent reconceptualizations of the Liberal Arts 3. What is Cultural Entrepreneurship? 4. Cultural Entrepreneurship in the Liberal Arts 2. The UMD B.A. Degree in Cultural Entrepreneurship 1. The three pillars of Cultural Entrepreneurship 1. Culture 2. Language 3. Entrepreneurship Overview
  3. 3. Overview 3. Situating Cultural Entrepreneurship in the Liberal Arts Curriculum The United States and World Languages 1. The four I’s and CUE 1.Discussion/Interaction
  4. 4. Why a new Degree in the Liberal Arts? The Current Status of the Liberal Arts United States: Constant pressures from external forces Practicality of degrees Application of skills Misunderstanding of liberal arts skills
  5. 5. “This is an intensely practical utilitarian age, and men virtually worship the “money-god,” and will not cease until they are convinced that there are nobler and purer shrines at which to worship. . . . While we recognize in the bustling activity around us the necessity for practical education, we do not pander to that depraved, money-born cry, ‘Nothing but the practical!’ That education which, ignoring culture, burdens the student’s mind with tables and technical terms, simply because these may be of use to him in his business or profession, is not practical but injurious in the extreme. The education founded upon comparison of what is best in Science and Literature, giving development to mind and heart, building strong by building deep and broad, is truly practical. The student who has learned to think, not merely to memorize, who has secured permanent culture and wisdom, who has absorbed and assimilated, but has not been stuffed and gorged, is the one who will be felt, wherever he may be.” (Hendrix College,1890-91, pp. 10-11).
  6. 6. Why a new Degree in the Liberal Arts? The Current Status of the Liberal Arts Worldwide: Resurgence of Liberal Arts in Europe and Asia Emphasis on the value of communication and arts skills for job search and placement
  7. 7. Recent Reconceptualizations of the Liberal Arts How have the Liberal Arts responded? By repositioning the Liberal Arts: marketing traditional skills in a modern context By starting discussions about integration with business/entrepreneurial skills By pointing to shifting economic trends that favor liberal arts skills
  8. 8. Repositioning
  9. 9. Integration
  10. 10. Shifting Economic Trends - the emerging creative economy
  11. 11. and then… Cultural Entrepreneurship appears...
  12. 12. What is Cultural Entrepreneurship? Cultural entrepreneurs…solve problems by disrupting belief systems—using television shows like Glee to initiate viewers into the disability or GLBTQ rights frameworks…. CULTURAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP AS A FORM OF THEORY
  13. 13. What is Cultural Entrepreneurship? Cultural Entrepreneurs are cultural change agents and resourceful visionaries who organize cultural, financial, social and human capital, to generate revenue from a cultural activity. Their innovative solutions result in economically sustainable cultural enterprises that enhance livelihoods and create cultural value and wealth for both creative producers and consumers of cultural services and products. CULTURAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP AS A (BUSINESS) PRACTICE
  14. 14. Cultural Entrepreneurship as an Academic Discipline combining theory and practice CUE combines three intellectual traditions and practical approaches 1. Entrepreneurship: Students learn the fundamentals of business management and entrepreneurship. Content is tailored to creative sector business creation, and includes both for profit and non-profit sector INTELLECTUAL ORIGIN: DUTCH CULTURAL ECONOMICS
  15. 15. Cultural Entrepreneurship as an Academic Discipline combining theory and practice CUE combines three intellectual traditions and practical approaches 2. Cultural and Creative Competencies: Courses allow students to explore and expand their creative skills, global understanding and interdisciplinary thinking. INTELLECTUAL ORIGIN: HOWARD GARDNER’S MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES
  16. 16. Cultural Entrepreneurship as an Academic Discipline combining theory and practice CUE combines three intellectual traditions and practical approaches 3. Foreign Language Instruction: Critical competency for global security, diplomacy and commerce. INTELLECTUAL ORIGIN: PAUL SIMON, THE TONGUE-TIED AMERICAN
  17. 17. World Languages and cultures in US 1. Paul Simon The Tongue-Tied American, 1988 2. Dessert or 3.Geopolitical tool for too long.
  18. 18. Americanization and cultural and linguistic pluralism 1. Assimilate 1. Integrate 1. Lose the rich fabric of the cultural integration and intercultural competency
  19. 19. Why is it so difficult putting language learning in our schools? 1. NDEA in 1957 Eisenhower Sputnik 2. CASL Center for Advanced Language Study @ Univ of Maryland Critical languages Strategic choice Security interests 3. Great variation in K-12 and Higher Ed L2 requirements
  20. 20. Changing World Economy 1. Economic power axis developments EU and BRIC nations 2. New thoughts on how to market New intercultural and linguistic challenges To buy is easy; but to sell is an art 3. Meeting cultures on “their” terms L2 language and cultural competencies 4. Schipol in the Netherlands in 1980
  21. 21. 4 I’s of Cultural Entrepreneurship 1. Interdisciplinary 2. International 3. Inspiring 4. Individualized
  22. 22. Ambidexterity in Curricular design 1. Cross disciplinary in thought and articulation HIST 1027 History of Islam (Meaning) GER 4044 Contemporary Germany 4044 ( Symphony and Synthesis) 2. Embedded and Articulated Requires 2 languages and cultures 2 semesters and 5 semesters 3. L2 Language and Culture: centrality in curriculum
  23. 23. Language embedded in the curriculum design 1. Mestenhauser Lecture in 2013 Betty Leask: Prof. of Applied Linguistics from Univ of South Australia ●Not just enrichment ●Local, regional, national and global content ●Embedded and articulated throughout 2. Functional and notional L2 language proficiency and cultural competency ( ACTFL)
  24. 24. Proficiency and Competency 1. Proficiency in a language A description of what an individual can do with a language 2. Competency in a culture To be able to interact with people of differing cultures and socio-economic backgrounds
  25. 25. Business and language connection 1. Utah as an example Information from Elaine Tarone from CARLA 35% residents speak a 2nd language Not just missionary work but business 2. Skullcandy/Backcountry.com and 110 venture capitalist firms 3. Public investment in Higher Education USTAR $100 million dollars
  26. 26. National Public Radio http://www.npr.org/2012/03/12/148252561/on-utahs-silicon-slopes-tech-jobs-get-a-lift The Secret Weapon: Language Proficiency and Cultural Competency
  27. 27. Cultural Appropriateness and Competency Inglorious Basterds von Quentin Tarantino Competency in a 2nd culture can be life-saving: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BDB_yCvuTlE
  28. 28. Conclusions on Language Integration ● Language and Culture is central to this degree ● Language and Culture study must be embedded and articulated ● Language and Culture study is a key aspect of an internationalized campus and curriculum ● Opting for anything less such as global enrichment is denying students their future
  29. 29. Discussion and Interaction Questions for the audience: Please share your experiences with interdisciplinary curriculum integration. Rewards Challenges Student Demand and Response Market Demand and Response
  30. 30. Discussion and Interaction Questions for the audience: What are your perspectives on integrating liberal arts, arts, sciences or medical education with business/entrepreneurship training? Rewards Challenges Student Demand and Response Market Demand and Response
  31. 31. Linkedin Groups The Cultural Entrepreneurship Group: http://www.linkedin.com/groups/Cultural-Entrepreneurship-Group-4726 Global Citizens for International Curricula: http://www.linkedin.com/groups/Global-Citizens-Internationalization-Cu Contact

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