The problem  for which euthanasia is offered as  a solution  is essentially this:  today and in the foreseeable future at ...
<ul><li>Further, Raanan Gillon’s summary of Dr. Exton-Smith’s study of 220 terminally ill patients in a London geriatric h...
<ul><li>Indeed, Henry Miller,  physician and formerly the vice chancellor of the University of Newcastle, may be right whe...
<ul><li>But the frequency of such requests – and there will always be some – is not directly relevant to the question of w...
<ul><li>“ Precisely because the dying process has now begun, man’s positive intervention is not an arrogant usurping of th...
<ul><li>mercy killing (“positive intervention”) is not </li></ul><ul><li>“ an arrogant usurping of the role of God” </li><...
Options and Alternatives <ul><li>What are the options? </li></ul><ul><li>What ar c e the alternatives? </li></ul><ul><li>W...
<ul><li>But  the acceptance of passive euthanasia and the rejection of active euthanasia  is a position with serious  theo...
<ul><li>legalization of eutha.  </li></ul><ul><li>settle the issue of its legalization </li></ul><ul><li>Prohibited by law...
<ul><li>a society  may legitimately use  the law  to shape  its basic institutions and practices  to accord with its  deep...
<ul><li>a society  may legitimately use  the law  to shape  its basic institutions and practices  to accord with its  deep...
<ul><li>a society  may legitimately use  the law  to shape  its basic institutions and practices  to accord with its  deep...
<ul><li>In a similar fashion, it could be argued that a  society  which is  opposed mercy killing on moral principal  may ...
<ul><li>The possibility of gross abuse </li></ul><ul><li>..once euthanasia is legalized, we will have opened the door to t...
<ul><li>1986 a Roper pall commissioned by the Hemlock Society </li></ul><ul><li>“ When a person has a painful and distress...
<ul><li>1987 California poll by Mervin Field </li></ul><ul><li>“ Should an incurably ill patient have the right to ask for...
<ul><li>1977 the National Opinion Research Center </li></ul><ul><li>“ When a person has a disease that cannot be cured, do...
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RCA Posing the Problem - Atsuko Watanbe

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RCA Posing the Problem - Atsuko Watanbe

  1. 1. The problem for which euthanasia is offered as a solution is essentially this: today and in the foreseeable future at least some people will be dying painful and prolonged deaths from incurable diseases, or they will pass the final stages of their life in an irreversible coma, existing in what is often described as a vegetative state.
  2. 2. <ul><li>Further, Raanan Gillon’s summary of Dr. Exton-Smith’s study of 220 terminally ill patients in a London geriatric hospital confronts us with the full extent of the problem : “For it is not only pain …..” </li></ul><ul><li>Richard Sarjeant’s litany of suffering can be joined with Gillon’s: “The suffereing from…” </li></ul><ul><li>This, then, is the problem . The remedy being offered is euthanasia for those who desire it. </li></ul>
  3. 3. <ul><li>Indeed, Henry Miller, physician and formerly the vice chancellor of the University of Newcastle, may be right when he claims, “There are few fatal illnesses in which the last weeks or months cannot be made tolerable by the generous use of drugs.” </li></ul><ul><li>That is, there may be few people who will face an agonizing death that cannot be relieved by drugs and fewer still who request euthanasia even when they knowingly face such an unpleasant prospect. </li></ul><ul><li>But the frequency of such requests – and there will always be some – is not directly relevant to the question of whether such requests ought to be granted. </li></ul>
  4. 4. <ul><li>But the frequency of such requests – and there will always be some – is not directly relevant to the question of whether such requests ought to be granted. </li></ul>
  5. 5. <ul><li>“ Precisely because the dying process has now begun, man’s positive intervention is not an arrogant usurping of the role of God but rather in keeping with the process which is now encompassing the person.” </li></ul><ul><li>man’s positive intervention- mercy killing </li></ul><ul><li>not an arrogant usurping of the role of God- (Wennberg’s explanation) </li></ul><ul><li>dying is not brought about by human intervention because that is already a fact of the situation and is not the patient’s own doing </li></ul><ul><li>keeping with the process which is now encompassing the person - </li></ul><ul><li>a process has enveloped the patient which will lead to an inevitable and imminent death </li></ul>
  6. 6. <ul><li>mercy killing (“positive intervention”) is not </li></ul><ul><li>“ an arrogant usurping of the role of God” </li></ul><ul><li>because the patient is already dying – that is, a process has enveloped the patient which will lead to an inevitable and imminent death. </li></ul><ul><li>Further, the dying is not brought about by human intervention because that is already a fact of the situation and is not the patient’s own doing; mercy killing in these circumstances will simply serve to bring to a close a process that is unalterably present and whose inescapable terminus is death. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Options and Alternatives <ul><li>What are the options? </li></ul><ul><li>What ar c e the alternatives? </li></ul><ul><li>What is the difference btn active & passive euthanasia? </li></ul><ul><li>When the author uses the term “euthanasia” what type of euthanasia does it refer to? </li></ul><ul><li>What is the purpose of options and alternatives? s </li></ul>
  8. 8. <ul><li>But the acceptance of passive euthanasia and the rejection of active euthanasia is a position with serious theoretical tensions that emerge most powerfully upon protracted reflection. Indeed, this position has come under serious attack in the professional literature, though it is not without able defenders . (l. 31- 35, p. 260) </li></ul>
  9. 9. <ul><li>legalization of eutha. </li></ul><ul><li>settle the issue of its legalization </li></ul><ul><li>Prohibited by law </li></ul><ul><li>Permitted by law </li></ul><ul><li>Crime </li></ul><ul><li>Euthanasia = crime </li></ul><ul><li>Q of its morality </li></ul><ul><li>determining the moral status of eutha </li></ul><ul><li>All morally objectionable acts </li></ul><ul><li>All acts that are intrinsically unobjectionable </li></ul><ul><li>Sin </li></ul><ul><li>Euthanasia = sin? </li></ul>
  10. 10. <ul><li>a society may legitimately use the law to shape its basic institutions and practices to accord with its deepest convictions about right and wrong . </li></ul><ul><li>a society may choose to recognize only hetrosexual, monogamous marriges while refusing to grant similar recognition to homosexual or polygaoums unions , and would claim to do so solely for moral reasons, thereby expressing values ultimately rooted in the Judeo-Christian tradition. </li></ul>
  11. 11. <ul><li>a society may legitimately use the law to shape its basic institutions and practices to accord with its deepest convictions about right and wrong . </li></ul><ul><li>as Islamic society with different beliefs about the nature of marriage would understandably and legitimately structure matters differently. </li></ul>
  12. 12. <ul><li>a society may legitimately use the law to shape its basic institutions and practices to accord with its deepest convictions about right and wrong . </li></ul><ul><li>Thus a society has a right to be guided by its own moral lights when it comes to shaping, by use of the law , its basic intuitions and practices . </li></ul><ul><li>In a similar fashion, it could be argued that a society which is opposed mercy killing on moral principal may legally prohibit the practice solely because it violates moral beliefs deeply ingrained in that society. </li></ul>
  13. 13. <ul><li>In a similar fashion, it could be argued that a society which is opposed mercy killing on moral principal may legally prohibit the practice solely because it violates moral beliefs deeply ingrained in that society. </li></ul><ul><li>For to legalize and regulate euthanasia would involve a recognition of, an involvement with, and a sanctioning of an activity that, we might supposed, would offend the moral sensibilities of society, and this, it would be argued, is too much to ask of any society . </li></ul>
  14. 14. <ul><li>The possibility of gross abuse </li></ul><ul><li>..once euthanasia is legalized, we will have opened the door to tragic consequences: </li></ul><ul><li>we will become cavalier in our attitude twd life </li></ul><ul><li>euthanasia will become less & less voluntary </li></ul><ul><li>troublesome categories of patients will be eliminated for the convenience of society </li></ul><ul><li>physicians will be encouraged to have a defeatist attitude in the fact of death </li></ul>
  15. 15. <ul><li>1986 a Roper pall commissioned by the Hemlock Society </li></ul><ul><li>“ When a person has a painful and distressing terminal disease, do you think doctors should or should not be allowed by law to end the patient’s life if there is not hope of recovery and the patient requests it?” </li></ul>
  16. 16. <ul><li>1987 California poll by Mervin Field </li></ul><ul><li>“ Should an incurably ill patient have the right to ask for and get life-ending medication?” </li></ul>
  17. 17. <ul><li>1977 the National Opinion Research Center </li></ul><ul><li>“ When a person has a disease that cannot be cured, do you think doctors should be allowed by law to end the patient’s life by some means if the patient and his family request it?” </li></ul>

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