PBHP DYC 20th anniversary 1993 to 2012

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The PBHP Dhamma Youth Camp (DYC) 20th Anniversary Commemorative Booklet

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PBHP DYC 20th anniversary 1993 to 2012

  1. 1. Dhamma Youth Camp 20th Anniversary 1993 – 2012 Compiled By Bro. Oh Teik Bin Vice President Of PBHP Adviser of Dhamma Youth Camp Persatuan Buddhist Hilir Perak 1125 A-B, Jalan Jawa, 36000 Teluk Intan, Perak Tel: 05-6217657 Fax: 05 – 6237850 Email: pbhpti@streamyx.com
  2. 2. Contents Messages and Articles 1 Buddha Puja 20 Tiratana Vandana 22 Metta Bhavana 27 The Triple Gem 30 The Noble Eightfold Path 31 The Wonderful 5 Precepts 34 Universal Prayer and Aspirations 35 Kalama Sutta 38 Great Sayings Of The Buddha 39 Camp Creed For DYC Participants 42 Contemplation Before & After Meals 43 Themes For DYC 1993 – 2012 44 Theme Songs For DYC 1993 – 2012 73 The PBHP Song 93 The DYC…Just A Memory? 94 Down Memory Lane 105 In The Master’s Steps…Dhammapada Verses 114 The Talent Night 115 10th DYC…Nyonya and Baba 116 Leadership and Management Skills 131 A Recipe To Beat Stress 135 Time-Table Of The 20th DYC 141 Good Dhamma & Educational Websites 142 Keeping In Touch 144 Acknowledgements
  3. 3. , 1 The 20th year of PBHP Dhamma Youth Camp is one of the big milestone anniversaries. As we celebrate this special 20th DYC anniversary, with gratitude and love, we should reflect on the commitment to the Dhamma propagation work we have made. It represents the sincerity and dedication in imparting Dhamma to the youths over the last 20 years…with loving-kindness. As a Buddhist organization, we strive to promote Buddha- Dhamma to the youths and educate them to actively promote the sublime teachings of the Buddha for peace and harmony. The DYC uses innovative and interactive ways to let the youths learn Dhamma through Dhamma talks/discussion, dynamics, role play, talent shows, outdoor activities and so on. Organizing a Youth Camp in English in a small town requires a lot of good conditions like capable manpower, creativity, dedication and hard work to ensure success. PBHP has to face a lot of challenges in providing the organizational leadership and management. We are really appreciative of the hard work, dedication and commitments of all who have helped. Their contributions and services are remarkable. In this 20th Anniversary, let us reflect on the great gift of the Dhamma that has been given over the past years. We should be very inspired to continue promoting Dhamma to the youths. On behalf of PBHP, I would like to express my sincerest gratitude and appreciation to the DYC organizing committees for their commitments and services for the past twenty years. This 20th DYC anniversary is acknowledging the significance of what they’ve accomplished in their noble Dhammaduta work. With deep joy and happiness, I extend my thanks to the organizing committee for giving me the opportunity to dedicate my best wishes and share my sincere thoughts here. Congratulations to the DYC on their 20th Anniversary! Sadhu! Message From Sis. Dr Hea Ai Sim President of Persatuan Buddhist Hilir Perak
  4. 4. 2 22 Mega Sadhu! To PBHP on the 20th annual Dhamma Youth Camp that will be held this year. Participants of all the DYCs remember with fond memories and appreciation for all the good they have obtained from them, for example, learning the importance and usefulness of Dhamma in their lives, getting the training to speak in public, making new valuable friends who practice the Dhamma etc. When I meet young adult Buddhists who say they were from Teluk Intan, I usually ask if they know the pillars of PBHP, namely Bro. Oh Teik Bin, Bro. Hor Ah Ha, Sis. Hea Ai Sim, Sis. Ooi Choon Peng etc. Many will exclaim with joy and pride in their faces that they were from PBHP, and express some of the fond memories they carry with them! Buddhism is nowadays recognized as one of the superior religions advocating peace, love and compassion, non- violence, cultivation of mind etc and its popularity is growing. Many people have informed me that the Dhamma has changed their lives, and they are extremely grateful for all the teachings. I’m happy to be associated with the annual DYC the last few years, and I hope that PBHP will continue this important aspect of their work to give our youths the basic foundation of Dhamma knowledge. With all good wishes: Ven. Dhammavuddha Mahathera 17 April 2012 Message From Ven. Dhammavuddho Mahathera Abbot of Vihara Buddha Gotama, Temoh, Perak
  5. 5. Modern civilization is full of imbalances. As for mankind, it is very much inclining towards materialism. Spirituality, like having a religious belief based on Truth, is neglected. This gap between materialism and spirituality is the main cause of social problems and ills. As a result, our behavior and attitudes have become aggressive, rude, egoistic and impatient. We seldom reflect on our wrong doings and be determined to make a change. Mankind has indulged more on gadgets than spending time to cultivate the mind. That is the reality of the modern mind. The damaging effect is underestimated. There is an assumption that happiness is to be found when our desires are fulfilled. This assumption grows from an early age whenever we get what we want and this gets stronger as we grow up under the influence of society’s trends. Depression, insomnia and mental disturbances are common diseases arising from unwholesome desires. This will become serious when we are in the denial mode. This contradicts with the ancient Truth of knowing suffering and transforming oneself. We will surrender to our desires as long as the mind is lack of right understanding. Our world has become more dangerous to live in. Not only have we to struggle to make a living, suffer from the ill effects of our contradictions within but we also have to cope with the external impact of climate change and natural The Dis-ease of Modern Life By Venerable Sampanno Venerable Sampanno born in 1962, ordained as a monk at 23. He has been giving Dhamma talks in English and Cantonese dating back to the early 1990s in various Buddhist societies, temples and Dhamma Camps. 3
  6. 6. 4 disasters. Have you ever asked yourself why the world as we know has come to this dire situation? Isn’t it better to prepare oneself for the path of harmony rather than becoming yet another victim of circumstances? We can always make the first move into the inward journey and be blessed with understanding and compassion or do we give tons of excuses to protect our ignorance? This is the choice we have to make in order to secure the future. One will realize that the Buddha is a nature lover; He was born, enlightened and passed away amid natural surroundings. Surely a natural environment with trees and plants creates a conducive place for cultivating the mind, creativity and inspiration. This is an important step to be in. The Buddha emphasized more on the internal aspect, just the opposite of what the majority does. Preparations for the inward journey resemble the building of the foundation of a house. When we are more mature in the understanding of the mind, we would be able to counsel or help others out of their problems. Cultivate first and share later. Understanding and happiness follows if the mind is in harmony. May The Blessings Of The Triple Gem Be Upon All Of You
  7. 7. 5 In 1990, there was an attempt to have an English Dhamma Youth at PBHP but only about five students wanted to join. The first Dhamma Youth Camp took off in 1993 with the Theme “Good Heart, Clear Mind”. Since then the PBHP DYC has come a long way. In the 19th DYC in 2011 with the Theme “Mindful Ways, Peaceful Days”, there was a grand total of 100 participants. In 1999, Bro.Yip Kah Kit, the Camp Leader of the 1998 DYC, started the PBHP DYC Alumni with the objectives of providing fellowship and a sense of belonging among the hundreds of ex- Campers scattered all over the country and world. Apart from attempting to form a ‘bonding’, the DYC Alumni had the vision of helping PBHP to promote the Dhamma . Sad to say, for the last few years the Alumni had been quite ‘dormant’. There is a lack of committed young Dhammafarers among the Alumni members. In a world of the Internet, Smartphones, Facebook and Twitter, too many young ones are caught in material and sensual pursuits to the extent there is little time and attention given to Dhamma learning, practice and realization. This is unfortunate as all will one day realize that ultimately what really matters in life is the treasure of the Dhamma. It is Dhamma realization and Kamma that is our true wealth, the wealth that follows us from life to life until we attain true happiness, bliss and liberation, the goal of Nibbana. As Dhammaduta workers, despite challenges and obstacles, we will continue to strive on, to impart the Sublime Teachings of the Buddha for the happiness and peace of all. Let us all aspire to live by the theme of the 1st DYC, “Good Heart, Clear Mind” and to walk “In The Master’s Steps” ( the theme for the 20th DYC 2012 ). “May more DYC Alumni Members become Dhammafarers.” Reflections On The DYC By Bro. Oh Teik Bin Bro. Oh is a retired teacher. He is the Vice President of Persatuan Buddhist Hilir Perak and has been associated with the DYC since its inception in 1993. From the 1st DYC onwards, Bro. Oh has served in various capacities. Currently he is the Adviser of the DYC.
  8. 8. 66 20 years ago when the 1st DYC was first mooted, there was only a handful of adult committee members to run the camp. We were multi-tasking our chores and I can vividly remember how the late Sis. Wong and a few kitchen helpers prepared all the meals. The highlight of the Camp was the Talent Night. The participants practiced very hard and the Talent Night was excellent…a memorable event to cherish. Running the first English DYC in Teluk Intan and possibly in Perak was tiring but most fulfilling. DYC has come a long way and is still going strong after two decades. Today the essence and the purpose of the Camp is still the same – to plant the Dhamma seed in the younger generation. It is so difficult to encounter the Dhamma; the participants now have a chance to know the Buddha’s teachings. Indeed no gifts excel the gift of Dhamma. It may be a fun camp but the Campers get to see the way…The Middle Way. The working committee also benefits in many ways. In making Dhamma known to others, they too will learn leadership, social and organizational skills. Most of all, they will have the privilege to serve the Triple Gem. Their sacrifice of selfless service and time is utmost important for the DYC to continue. I sincerely hope the DYC will continue for the years to come. As our country speeds to modernization and materialism, the spiritual needs are ever more pressing and wanting. Sadhu! The DYC…Thoughts From Bro. Chiew Siew Peng Bro. Chiew was the Chairman of the 1st and 2nd DYC in 1993 and 1994. He has been for many years and is still a Committee Member of PBHP.
  9. 9. 7 It has been 20 years since the first Dhamma Youth Camp! I was there at the first camp, not as a participant, but as a helper and I have been in all the camps since then. I became the Chairperson for the first time during the 5th Dhamma Youth Camp and had held this position till the 13th Dhamma Youth Camp. In between then, there was one year I did not become Chairperson. And now after a lapse of 6 years, here I am the Chairperson again, of the 20th Dhamma Youth Camp. Everything happens for a reason. Ever since my childhood, many have asked why I was not sent to a Chinese school. My father did not know what to decide for our education. My second sister and I were sent to English medium schools just because we drew on a piece of paper some English words and my 2 youngest siblings penned a few Chinese words on the pieces of paper! When I was accepted to the Teacher’s Training College in Kuala Terengganu, I was very thankful for being exposed to Dhamma by my seniors and also the Terengganu Buddhist Association. I am also very grateful to PBHP for this is the place I’ve learnt the Dhamma and this is also the best place where I can serve Dhamma. Many parents gave us feedback that their children have changed to be better persons after camps. I have to make them realize that that would soon pass for most cases unless the children or youths are continuously guided and constantly practicing the Dhamma. Whatever it is, I’m not disappointed if things don’t always turn out the way we want. Our aim here is to plant Dhamma seeds. I always make these aspirations: “May all what I’m doing be a great success and may they all be beneficial to all.” I always have the faith that if we set ourselves to do something good, we will have all the Blessings of the Triple Gem. DYC, The Dhamma And Me By Sis. Ooi Choon Peng Sis. Ooi is the Deputy President of PBHP and has been involved many years in Dhamma education for children and youths. She is an English teacher.
  10. 10. First of all, “Happy Birthday” and Congratulations to the DYC for celebrating its 20th birthday this year! And Sadhu to all the Bodhisattvas in the PBHP who planted the seeds and nurtured the DYC since 1993. I am indeed grateful that I am part of it. Being involved in the DYC for some years I consider myself very fortunate to have found the most precious treasure in PBHP and the DYC. The people I met in DYC, the senior teachers and devoted Dhammadutta workers from all walks of life have demonstrated great persistence and patience overcoming all the challenges in making the DYC a success throughout the past 20 years. Sadhu! With the sincere dedication of the Dhammadutta workers and the Blessings of the Triple Gem, the DYC is getting greater support; it has become one of the most greatly anticipated annual happenings for teenagers in Teluk Intan. “Like the seeds of the lotus we are, with the sunshine and rain we’ll grow…” The lyrics from the Buddhist hymn “The Lotus Seed” make us reflect. The DYC has played and is playing a tremendous part to promote the Dhamma to the young …Dhamma that will help us to understand the true nature of existence. In this way, we learn to rid ourselves of the defilements of greed, anger and delusion that have caused us much suffering. With Dhamma, we will grow to cope with the trials and tribulations of life. Lastly, my heartfelt gratitude to all my dearest kalyanamitras or spiritual friends, Uncles and Aunties, all my dear teachers and colleagues , who have led and guided me in righteous ways ever since my younger days. You all have cared and planted the Dhamma seeds….I need to nurture these seeds that will one day bloom into the full lotus. May all of you be well, happy and peaceful! A Heartfelt Message From Sis. Ong Peck Ing Peck Ing was a Camp Leader in 1995 and the DYC Chairperson from 2006 – 2008. She is a Physics teacher in a school in T.I. 8
  11. 11. As an ex-chairperson in the 17th to 19th Dhamma Youth Camp (from 2009 to 2011 ), it was a challenge for me to lead a group of teenagers in the Organizing Committee of the PBHP DYC. However, looking back, I feel very happy and proud to see them learning and growing in the Dhamma. Time passes very fast and the Dhamma Youth Camp is already 20 years old. Through Dhamma camps such as this, I can say that many youths are trained in good leadership, human relationships and also in walking the Noble Eightfold Path. Here I would like to thank Brother Oh Teik Bin and Sister Ooi Choon Peng who as advisors in the last three DYCs when I was the Chairperson provided me guidance and moral support in the organization of the Dhamma Youth Camp. At times, being a chairperson of the DYC, it was difficult to find a group of youths to work together with me as committee members but by the blessings of the Triple Gem, we managed to run the various activities and programs of the Camp smoothly. Although there were problems and challenges to meet, they were overcome and they served as Life lessons for me as well as the members of the Organizing Committee of the Camp. I want to thank all the 17th – 19th DYC Exco members who worked hard and co-operated with me in ensuring the Camp activities could be carried out in the best possible ways. I would like to wish all the DYC Committee Members and 20th DYC participants “Happy 20th DYC Anniversary 2012”. I hope that in future more teenagers or secondary students will join the DYC so that they can learn important Dhamma and also strive on diligently in the practice of Dana, Sila and Bhavana. May you all be well and happy! 17th DYC – 19th DYC…Looking back By Bro. Cheang Chee Hoo Chee Hoo, a Committee Member of PBHP is a teacher in a school in Teluk Intan. He is also pursuing his degree in Mathematics Education through UPSI. 9
  12. 12. I am delighted to learn that the DYC is celebrating its 20th anniversary. It has grown from strength to strength and has brought lots of benefits to the youths. I participated in the camp thrice; the Buddha's Teaching that I gained has benefited me in many ways. It has made me a happy, calm and peaceful person. As a practising Buddhist, I have learned to be moderate, taking the middle path and doing the right thing in any situation. Living in an era of a developed global village, most of us are chasing for external happiness, external excitement and material wealth. All these give us a false sense of happiness and security. True happiness can only be derived when we practice the Noble Eightfold Path and moderation. In short, adopt a simple and righteous life. The introduction of loving-kindness meditation at the DYC was the first exposure I had in meditation. Contemplating in Metta (loving-kindness) brings harmony and compassion into our relationship with people. It helps to overcome hatred, anger, jealousy and all sorts of negative thoughts of others. Love of oneself and love for others bring peacefulness and avoid conflicts. All of us are subjected to Cause and Effect and our ignorance and craving have caused much suffering. Do not give up seeking the real Truth. I hope all participants at the DYC will benefit from the Dhamma and put The Buddha’s Teachings into daily practice. May you all be free from suffering. May you all be well and happy. Wishing you all a fruitful and enjoyable Camp. Sadhu! Sadhu! Sadhu! The DYC, Dhamma and Me… Neoh Ein Yau was the Camp Leader in the 9th DYC of 1999. After his STPM at St. Anthony’s Secondary School in Teluk Intan, he pursued his tertiary education in Dentistry at the Universiti Sains Malaysia. He is now a practicing Dentist in the Klang Valley. 10
  13. 13. I joined the PBHP Dhamma Youth Camp (DYC) 14 years back thinking of expanding my social circle, especially knowing more female friends. What I had never thought of was that this event turned out to be a turning point in my life. I got to know the Dhamma (teachings of the Buddha) and this has helped to develop the spiritual aspect within me. Previously, I was afraid of failure in life. Every time there was an exam, I could not sleep well worrying about the results. This started when I was in Primary 5 and it had been on-going until I got a breakthrough in Secondary 5. I was able to manage my fears better when I was taking my Sijil Pelajaran Malaysia (SPM)…at least I got a good night sleep before taking the exam the next day. What helped me? Hmm…I guess my daily reflection: learning to see and accept things as they are; understanding impermanence; meditation; and applying mindfulness in life. However, as I continued to practise the Dhamma, the journey has not been smooth-sailing and fear will get the better of me at times and I will fall back into the “black hole”. As such, I continue to apply mindfulness in my daily life so as to allow me to be at peace with myself. I always remind myself not to be emotionally overwhelmed as it affects my judgment and objectivity. If you happen to read this article, hesitate no more. Come and join DYC and learn that life is more than just results, career, money, status, etc; I learn the beauty of having spiritual friendship; I learn to appreciate every moment of my life. All in all, I am grateful to DYC for opening the door of my heart to the Dhamma and it has changed my life. Are you ready to change yours? What I Learnt From The DYC Chuah Chong Hong obtained a B.Sc degree in Life Sciences from NUS; subsequently he got a Graduate Diploma in Social Work from SIM University. He is currently a Social Worker at a Social Service Agency in Singapore. 11
  14. 14. My first impression of DYC was that it just another fun camp. But later, I realize that DYC is more than that. To new participants, it may be their first proper introduction to the Dhamma, a time when the Dhamma seed is sown. For some ‘veterans’, it was refreshing fellowship with the Dhamma. More importantly, the DYC is a platform that binds youths together, connects Kalyanamitras and motivating them to continue to walk the Dhamma path together. Memories and experiences gained in DYC are unforgettable too. I can always recall those good times. We DYCians spent time together in PBHP in so many programs and rehearsing for the talent night. It was enjoyable to work together. My first action dance was learned from the 6th DYC. There was also fun helping the Dhamma sisters in the kitchen. However, the DYC is also a beginning of the Dhamma journey for me. The Dhamma helps transform my heart to see the right from the wrong and good from bad. It helps me to view my life and the world from a perspective not blinded by greed, hatred and delusion while realizing the importance of generating loving kindness towards oneself and others. When I feel lost, I remind myself of the verse “Reject anything which when accepted and practiced leads to more anger, more greed and more delusion. Accept anything which when accepted and practiced leads to unconditional love, contentment and wisdom”. This is the Teaching in the Kalama Sutta. May all of us continue to mind our ‘monkey mind’ throughout our life and may the Dhamma grow strongly in Nostalgic Thoughts of The DYC By Bro. Chooi Yit Seng Yit Seng, a Biotechnology grad is now pursuing his Master’s degree. He was the Camp Leader in the 9th DYC 2001. 12
  15. 15. all of us. “Reverend, is it possible to travel through time?” “Of course, it’s possible. We are travelling through time even as we speak!” That was a part of my conversation with Rev. Abhinyana that still remains vivid in my mind. It was after the conclusion of the Dhamma Youth Camp (DYC) that I attended in 1997 that Rev. Abhinyana answered many of our questions. During my student days that I had the privilege to attend 3 DYCs, twice as a member and once as a committee member. I must say that DYC really stood out in its own unique way. One of my most vivid memories of DYC was during meal time when our insatiable appetite and restless temperament was put to the test. While going through a vegetarian diet for the first time was easy thanks to the delicious dishes prepared by the kind aunties, focusing my restless mind on the act of eating alone minus all the unnecessary chatter was indeed a challenge. That was when I first got to grip with the importance of mindfulness. Another aspect of DYC that had a lasting impression on me was metta bhavana (loving kindness meditation) that we practised before bedtime. It not only trained us to have loving kindness for everyone around us (including our enemies and evil spirits!), but also helped to calm down our mind before sleep, an exercise which I found extremely useful in my subsequent years as a working adult in order to have a sound relaxing sleep. I also forged many wonderful friendships with my DYC mates which have lasted until today. In conjunction with the 20th anniversary of DYC, I sincerely hope that more and more youths in Teluk Intan will continue to benefit from the DYC experience and may the light of the Dharma shine upon you Lasting Impressions From The DYC By Bro. Yip Kah Kit Kah Kit graduated with a LL.B from the London School Of Economics on a Bank Negara Scholarship. He is a Senior Legal Executive at Bank Negara. Kah Kit was the 1998 DYC Camp Leader. 13
  16. 16. All in all, I have participated in 5 DYCs , each of them focusing on a theme from which important Life lessons were imparted. In the DYC, we often get to listen to talks by monks, brothers and sisters; we learned while we laughed and sometimes reflected in deep thought. We also enjoyed various sports and meaningful games; we really had great fun. We also practiced hard to make a great show for the Talent Night, one of the most anticipated events by many of us. Lastly and most importantly, we enjoyed the delicious meals prepared by our Dhamma sisters and aunties. I learned to cook with Metta or loving-kindness and the food turned out extra delicious. Apart from the fun activities in the DYC, I have learned very beneficial Dhamma teachings. Two important ones I treasure: Firstly, there is the teaching of Anicca or impermanence. When bad things happen, I tell myself: “It will pass” and so I don’t get too upset. When good things happen, I tell myself: “It will pass” and so I don’t get too excited. Then, I have learned to stay happy in a simple way. That is, to always keep in mind that I can still choose to be happy no matter what happens and so, I stay happy. Oh yes! Before I say goodbye, there are two things I want to say to you. First, “Practice what you have learned from DYC in your life.” Second, “ Don’t just join DYC; join other PBHP activities as well”. You will all then grow in compassion and wisdom. May The Blessings Of The Triple Gem Be Always Upon The PBHP Dhamma Youth Camp and may the DYC continue for as long as it can to plant the Dhamma seeds in the young. Learning Dhamma From The DYC By Bro. Chooi Yit Tsin Yit Tsin completed his A-Levels in Help University College and will be pursuing his Degree in Economics. He was the Camp Leader in the 19th DYC 2011. 14
  17. 17. I am glad to be given this opportunity to write a few words for the 20th Anniversary of PBHP DYC. Time really flies. It’s already 20 years of the DYC. I still remember my very first time joining the DYC. I was in Form 1. It was the 9th DYC. I felt so shy and dared not voice out anything! . Luckily, I found many seniors who were so nice and friendly. I vowed to join such camps again. I did …for 3 consecutive years. Because of DYC, I started to have interest in meditation. After one of the camps, I joined a meditation retreat because I wanted to know more about it. I am proud to say that I was the youngest in the retreat amongst all the uncles and aunties. With 4 years experience of being a participant, I was chosen to be a Camp Leader for the 14th and 16th DYC. Luckily, I had a group of spiritual friends always beside me during the ups and downs. We spent weeks of preparation together and spent time recording for the camp theme song. Conducting a camp is much more difficult than joining one. Running a camp needs leadership and communication with all the committee members. I have really learnt a lot through conducting camps. There are many obstacles and challenges throughout the whole camp. I need to make decisions and take wise steps to let the camp flow smoothly. Naturally, I have learnt from mistakes and this has helped me grow. I must say that DYC is a great life enriching experience. There are so many Life lessons to be learnt fro the camp. I hope that DYC will continue on and on, to enable the young to reap tremendous benefits. Sadhu! Fond Memories Of The DYC By Sis. Lee Siew Ling Siew Ling is a teacher in a Primary School and is also pursuing her degree in education at a Teaching College. She was the DYC Camp Leader in 2004 and 2006 15
  18. 18. Being A Dhamma Youth… Aik Wei Shen “Walk the Path with Heart” was the theme for the 8th Dhamma Youth Camp (DYC), the first DYC I attended. The theme not only signifies the beginning of my journey as a Dhamma Youth, but also serves as a reminder to walk this path in accordance to the eightfold path. The meaning of Dhamma Youth requires some clarification. As the Dhamma generally means the truth, a Dhamma Youth is someone who aspires to seek the truth beyond the boundaries set by any religion or culture. This was the main message I brought with me from the DYCs. Bhante Kovida, an inspiring Dhamma teacher whom I got to know from the 9th DYC once said that he is a student of the Dhamma (as opposed to merely being a Buddhist), probably hinting that he aspires to learn beyond Buddhism. My journey in the Dhamma continued with the Cambridge University Buddhist Society and interestingly, also with the Queens’ College Chapel of Anglican Christian tradition. I learnt the universal virtues such as metta (loving-kindness) and mindfulness that transcend culture and religion. The uplifting spiritual experiences, be it from praying in the chapel or radiating metta in the temple, are ultimately teaching me to learn the Dhamma with an open heart. To the new participants who are lucky enough to participate in this year’s 20th Anniversary DYC, have lots of fun, know lots of friends, and more importantly, bring home a message. I hope one day you can share this message with me. Special thanks to all the brothers and sisters who gave me the guidance and the good memories in the DYCs that I was part of. I still remember the cold air-conditioned rooms, the morning wake-up bells, the outdoor trips, and the delicious vegetarian meals. Wei Shen was the Camp Leader in the 10th DYC (2002) and 12th DYC (2004). He graduated in Natural Sciences from the University of Cambridge and is currently a D Phil student in Chemical Biology at the University of Oxford. 16
  19. 19. It was 1997. That part of my life was called “Seedling”. I participated in a Library Camp and became a librarian at PBHP. I met new friends and we became Kalyana Mitras till today. That year, I started to know about Buddhism. I am so glad that I met great teachers there (Bro Oh, Sis Ooi, Bro Hor and many more) who guided me to realise the importance of learning the Dhamma. I was given a lot of opportunities to take up responsibilities and learn to be a leader. In 1998, I became the Secretary of DYC, and in 2000, I was the Camp Leader. I admit that I didn’t learn much about Dhamma that time. All I did was getting to know more friends and learning to organise activities. However, that was the place where my journey began That was where the seed of Dhamma in me started to grow. In 2002, I went to USM to further my studies. That part of my life was called “Growing”. I joined the USM Buddhist Society and continued to learn the Dhamma. Along the way, I started to realise how PBHP and DYC had influenced my life. I realised that I had started to build my faith and confidence in Buddhism since 1997. My learning journey became much easier with the basics that I had learned from PBHP and DYC. That is why I am so proud and grateful to be born in Teluk Intan! I will no bet who I am today without the Dhamma. I couldn’t imagine how my life would be today if I never started my journey 15 years ago. I am a bigger tree today. I am still growing and spreading more seeds of Dhamma. Hope that the seeds will grow to be trees and spread more seeds around the world. Thank you very much PBHP! The Seeds Of Dhamma Foo Kok Keong is an Entrepreneur and Educator. He is the Founder and CEO of an Educational Company in Penang, He holds a B.Sc. Hons and an M.A. in Education and is currently doing his Ph.D in USM.. He also instructs at W.O.U. 17
  20. 20. What is optimal health? By Dr Tan Cheng Chin Time flies! DYC is already twenty years old. I was very fortunate to be able to participate in the DYC activities. It was enriching experience. It gave me the opportunity to learn about Dharma. Thanks. It is an absolute privilege to be asked to write for your 20th Anniversary Booklet. When I was in the Medical College I had a classmate who was a top student. But he failed his final examination. Why? He felt sick and was not able to sit for the exam. So you see health is so important. What is health? It is not just the absence of disease or illness. It is a state of physical, emotional and mental well being. What is optimal health? It consists of:- 1. Exercise 2. Attitude 3. Rest 4. Nutrition 5. Stress management Exercise Just be active and move. You exercise to improve you lung and heart functions. Exercise also gives you a sense of well being. Attitude It is important to have a positive mental attitude. Buddhism teaches us about the following: Dr Tan is a private medical practitioner with vast experience. He is also a popular motivational Speaker and has been the Medical Adviser for many DYCs of PBHP. 18
  21. 21. * Gain and loss 19 * Honour and dishonour * Praise and blame * Happiness and sorrow – this understanding will help us to gain positive mental attitudes. Rest The ideas of having rest is for the body * to repair damaged tissue * to replace worn out tissue * to maintain the functioning tissue Nutrition You need carbohydrates, proteins and fats for energy. You need micronutrients to help to convert the food to energy. They are vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and phytochemicals. Don’t forget your water (2 liters per day) and fiber too. Stress Being a student is stressful- homework, study and extra- curricular activities. How can you have good stress management? The following are important: * Meditation and * The central teachings of the Buddha like The 4 Noble Truths, The 5 Precepts, Dana ( Charity and Service ), Mindfulness When you understand the Dhamma Teachings and their applications, you will have less stress. So do remember the acronym EARNS Exercise, Attitude, Rest, Nutrition, Stress Optimal health does not just happen! A person EARNS it!
  22. 22. hefty household bills of all sorts we need to pay monthly. When we are all burdened with unnecessary commitments, we have little time for so may important things that really matter in life – learning about and developing the mind, showing kindness to others, rendering services to the needy, spending time with our loved ones and cultivating our spirituality. We lead our lives as if they will not end; we fail to realize that life is uncertain and death is certain. The gratitude we owe our parents is tremendous. It’s indeed sad that many children abandon their parents or give little attention and care to their parents. Reason? They are in deep ‘busy-ness’. Filial piety and gratitude are among the virtues we need to practice if we wish to realize true happiness and peace. Buddha Puja 20 NAMO BUDDHAYA NAMO DHARMAYA NAMO SANGHAYA NAMO TASSA BHAGAVATO ARAHATO SAMMA SAMBUDDHASSA ( 3X ) ( Homage to Him, the Blessed One, the Exalted One, The Fully Enlightened One ) Buddham Saranam Gacchami Dhammam Saranam Gacchami Sangham Saranam Gacchami ( I go to the Buddha as my refuge. I go to the Dhamma as my refuge. I go to the Sangha as my refuge. ) Dutiyampi Buddham Saranam Gacchami Dutiyampi Dhammam Saranam Gacchami Dutiyampi Sangham Saranam Gacchami ( For the second time I go to the Buddha as my refuge. For the second time I go to the Dhamma as my refuge. For the second time I go to the Sangha as my refuge. ) Tatiyampi Buddham Saranam Gacchami Tatiyampi Dhammam Saranam Gacchami Tatiyampi Sangham Saranam Gacchami ( For the third time I go to the Buddha as my refuge. For the third time I go to the Dhamma as my refuge. For the third time I go to the Sangha as my refuge. ) ( Homage To Buddha, Dhamma and Sangha )
  23. 23. Panatipata Veramani Sikkhapadam Samadiyami ( I undertake to observe the precept to abstain from killing living beings. ) Adinnadana Veramani Sikkhapadam Samadiyami ( I undertake to observe the precept to abstain from taking things not given. ) Kamesu Micchacara Veramani Sikkhapadam Samadiyami ( I undertake to observe the precept to abstain from sexual misconduct. ) Musavada Veramani Sikkhapadam Samadiyami ( I undertake to observe the precept to abstain from false speech. ) Surameraya-Majja-Pamadatthana Veramani Sikkhapadam Samadiyami ( I undertake to observe the precept to abstain from liquor causing intoxication and heedlessness. ) SADHU! SADHU! SADHU! ( Excellent! Excellent! Excellent! ) Sharing of Merits with Devas and all beings Etta-vataca amhehi Sambhatam punna sampadam Sabbe deva Sabbe bhuta Sabbe satta anumodantu Sabba sampatti siddhiya ( May all sentient beings participate in the merits we have accrued by these offerings and all other good actions for the benefit of all. Bliss to them all. ) Transference of Merits to the departed Idam me natinam hotu Sukhita hontu natayo ( 3 X ) ( Let this merit accrue to our departed relatives and may they be happy ) 21
  24. 24. Ti – Ratana Vandana 22 Salutation To The Triple Gem NAMO TASSA BHAGAVATO ARAHATO SAMMA SAMBUDDHASSA ( 3X ) Iti’ pi so bhagava araham samma-sambuddho Vijja-carana-sampanno sugato loka-vidu Anuttaro purisa-damma-sarathi Sattha deva-manussanam buddho bhagava’ti Buddham jivita-pariyantam saranam gacchami Ye ca Buddha atita ca Ye ca Buddha anagata Paccupanna ca ye Buddha Aham vandami sabbada N’atthi me saranam annam Buddho me saranam varam Etena sacca-vajjena Hotu me jayamangalam Svakkhato bhagavato dhammo Sanditthiko akaliko ehipassiko opanayiko Paccattam veditabbo vinnuhi ti Dhammam jivita-pariyantam saranam gacchami Ye ca dhamma atita ca Ye ca dhamma anagata Paccupanna ca ye dhamma Aham vandami sabbada
  25. 25. N’atthi me saranam annam 23 Dhammo me saranam varam Etena sacca-vajjena Hotu me jayamangalam Supatipanno bhagavato savakasangho Ujupatipanno bhagavato savakasangho Nayapatipanno bhagavato savakasangho Samicipatipanno bhagavato savakasangho Yadidam cattari purisa-yugani Attha-purisa-puggala Esa bhagavato savakasangho Ahuneyyo pahuneyyo dakkhineyyo Anjali-karaniyo Anuttaram punnakkhettam lokassati Sangham jivita-pariyantam saranam gacchami Ye ca sangha atita ca Ye ca sangha anagata Paccupanna ca ye sangha Aham vandami sabbada N’atthi me saranam annam Sangho me saranam varam Etena sacca-vajjena Hotu me jayamangalam
  26. 26. 24 Blessings Bhavatu sabba-mangalam Rakkhantu sabba-devata Sabba-buddhanubhavena Sada sotthi bhavantu te Bhavatu sabba-mangalam Rakkhantu sabba-devata Sabba-dhammanubhavena Sada sotthi bhavantu te Bhavatu sabba-mangalam Rakkhantu sabba-devata Sabba-sanghanubhavena Sada sotthi bhavantu te Sadhu! Sadhu! Sadhu!
  27. 27. Tiratana Vandana (Salutation To The Triple Gem) Salutation To The Buddha ( Iti’ pi so …) Such indeed is He, the Blessed One, Holy, Fully and Perfectly Awake. Complete in Knowledge and Conduct, Well-gone, Knower of the Worlds, Guide Unsurpassed of Persons to be tamed. All my life I go for refuge to the Buddha. The Buddhas of the past. The Buddhas yet to be. The Buddhas that now are. All of them I worship. No other refuge than the Buddha. Refuge supreme, is there for me. By the virtue of this Truth, May blessed victory be mine! Salutation To The Dhamma (Svakkhato…) Well-communicated is the Teaching of the Blessed One, to be self-realized, timeless, for one to ‘come and see’, leading onward, to be known individually by the wise. All my life I go for refuge to the Dhamma. The Dhammas of the past, the Dhammas yet to be, the Dhammas that now are. All of them I worship. No other refuge than the Dhamma. Refuge supreme, is there for me. By the virtue of this Truth, May blessed victory be mine! Salutation To The Sangha (Supatipanno… ) Of good conduct is the Order of the Disciples of the Blessed One, Of upright conduct…Of proper conduct …Of dutiful conduct… The four pairs of Persons, the eight Individuals, are this very Order of the Disciples Of the Blessed one, worthy of worship, worthy of hospitality, worthy of offerings, worthy of salutation with folded hands, an incomparable field of merit to the world. 25
  28. 28. All my life I go for refuge to the Sangha. The Sanghas of the past, The Sanghas yet to be, The Sanghas that now are, All of Them I worship. No other refuge than the Sangha, Refuge Supreme, is there for me. By the virtue of This Truth, may blessed victory be mine! Blessings (Bhavatu… ) May all blessings be yours May all the gods protect you By the power of all the Buddhas, may happiness be yours. May all blessings be yours May all the gods protect you By the power of all the Dhammas, may happiness be yours. May all blessings be yours May all the gods protect you By the power of all the Sangha, may happiness be yours. 26
  29. 29. hefty household bills of all sorts we need to pay monthly. When we are all burdened with unnecessary commitments, we have little time for so may important things that really matter in life – learning about and developing the mind, showing kindness to others, rendering services to the needy, spending time with our loved ones and cultivating our spirituality. We lead our lives as if they will not end; we fail to realize that life is uncertain and death is certain. The gratitude we owe our parents is tremendous. It’s indeed sad that many children abandon their parents or give little attention and care to their parents. Reason? They are in deep ‘busy-ness’. Filial piety and gratitude are among the virtues we need to practice if we wish to realize true happiness and peace. Metta Bhavana – Meditation On Loving-Kindness What is METTA ? Metta is… Loving-Kindness, Goodwill, Friendliness, Benevolence, Concord, Love In Metta, there is a strong wish for the happiness and welfare of oneself and others. The heart opens unconditionally encompassing all that is. Metta is devoid of self-interest. One with Metta has the attitude of a friend who wants to give to another the best to further his or her well-being. Just as a mother gives her own life to protect her child, so Metta only gives and never wants anything in return. The 11 Benefits of Metta Bhavana 1 One sleeps happily. 2 One wakes up happily. 3 One has no bad dreams. 4 One is dear to human beings. 5 One is dear to non-human beings. 6 One is protected by the gods. 7 One’s countenance is radiant. 8 Fire, poison and weapons do not affect one. 9 One’s mind concentrates quickly. 10 One dies without bewilderment. 11 If one develops no further, one will reach at least to the Brahma World. 27
  30. 30. Metta Bhavana – Guidelines 1 28 We can spend some minutes a day on Metta Bhavana, sending thoughts of loving-kindness to all beings throughout the world. Metta Bhavana – Guidelines 2 1 Sit in a relaxed posture on the floor or a cushion. (cross- legged, semi-lotus or lotus position ) 2 Keep your back straight. 3 You may close your eyes. 4 Breathe in and out softly and naturally. 5 Allow your thoughts to dwell upon loving-kindness and compassion. Metta Bhavana – Guidelines 3 First, radiate thoughts of loving-kindness to yourself. Charge your heart and mind with thoughts such as : “May I be free from harm and danger. May I be free from mental suffering. May I be free from physical suffering. May I be well, happy and peaceful.” Metta Bhavana – Guidelines 4 You may repeat such thoughts of Metta until your concentration and calmness grow. Metta Bhavana – Guidelines 5 Next, radiate thoughts of loving-kindness to your parents and other family members as follows: “May they be free from harm and danger. May they be free from mental suffering. May they be free from physical suffering. May they be well, happy and peaceful.” Metta Bhavana – Guidelines 6 Radiate thoughts of loving-kindness to all your teachers and friends repeating mentally and fervently the four lines as before.
  31. 31. The Triple Gem Metta Bhavana – Guidelines 7 Radiate thoughts of loving-kindness to your enemies or people who are negative towards you, repeating mentally and fervently the four lines as before. Metta Bhavana – Guidelines 8 Lastly, radiate your thoughts of loving-kindness to all beings in the whole world, universe and all the realms of existence, repeating mentally and fervently the four lines as before. 28 The End May METTAMay METTA Grow and GrowGrow and Grow in you.in you. 29
  32. 32. The Triple Gem 30 In Buddhism, The Triple Gem refers to *THE BUDDHA * THE DHAMMA * THE SANGHA WHO IS THE BUDDHA? * He is the Blessed, Holy and Fully Enlightened One. * He is the Teacher of the Dhamma, the Truth that will lead all beings to Perfect Happiness and Bliss – NIBBANA * He is the incomparable Leader and Teacher of gods and men. * He is the Fully Awakened One, the Knower of the worlds. * He is the Blessed One endowed with clear vision and virtuous conduct. WHAT IS THE DHAMMA? * It is The TRUTH, The Way Things Really Are. * It refers to the Teachings Of The Buddha. * It is NATURE and The Universal Laws. * Dhamma can refer to Good or Righteous Conduct. By learning, understanding and practicing the Dhamma, we can 1 End our problems 2 Be happy and peaceful 3 Attain the Bliss of Nibbana WHAT IS THE SANGHA? * The Sangha can also refer to the spiritual people who practice and teach true Dhamma and guide us in the correct spiritual path to reach Nibbana. * The Sangha may also refer to the spiritual community that understands and practices the Dhamma to gain wisdom and liberation. True Refuge in The Triple Gem will lead one to Happiness, Peace, Bliss and Freedom Of The Mind. You can check out the following URL: http://www.slideshare.net/ohteikbin/the-triple-gem
  33. 33. The Noble Eightfold Path 31 The Ultimate Happiness is NIRVANA, the unconditioned state of Perfect Peace, Perfect Wisdom, Perfect Freedom * The Way to NIRVANA ( NIBBANA ) is known as The Noble Eightfold Path * To Reach The Goal, One has to 1 Practice Morality 2 Cultivate Mental Cultivation 3 Develop Wisdom Noble Eightfold Path – The Middle Way * MORALITY – Right Speech, Right Action, Right Livelihood * CONCENTRATION – Right Effort, Right Mindfulness, Right Concentration * WISDOM – Right Understanding, Right Thought 1 RIGHT UNDERSTANDING – * Knowledge of the Four Noble Truths ( The Truth of Suffering, the Cause of Suffering, the End of Suffering and the Way to the End * The Understanding of things as they really are The nature of wholesome and unwholesome actions * The Three Characteristics of Life ( All compounded things are impermanent, subject to suffering and without a Self ) * Law of Dependent Origination ( All phenomena are relative, conditioned states and do not arise independently of supportive conditions. )
  34. 34. 2 RIGHT THOUGHT 32 * Thoughts of detachment from worldly pleasures rather than being selfishly attached to them * Thoughts of benevolence, harmlessness, selflessness Thoughts filled with love and compassion 3 RIGHT SPEECH – * No Lying, No Slander, No Harsh Speech, No Frivolous Talk * Truthful speech, kind and harmonious speech, meaningful and beneficial speech 4 RIGHT ACTION – * No Killing, No Stealing, No Sexual Misconduct * Kind and compassionate action, generosity and charity, contentment and respect for personal relationship 5 RIGHT LIVELIHOOD – * No trading in human beings, in weapons, in flesh, in intoxicating drinks and drugs, in poisons. 6 RIGHT EFFORT – * Cultivate a positive attitude and have enthusiasm in the things we do * Effort to reject evil that has arisen in the mind Effort to prevent the arising of evil in the mind * Effort to develop unarisen good in the mind Effort to maintain the good which has arisen in the mind 7 RIGHT MINDFULNESS - * Mindfulness of the body * Mindfulness of the feelings
  35. 35. * Mindfulness of the thoughts 33 * Mindfulness of the mind states 8 RIGHT CONCENTRATION – * Developing one-pointedness of the mind * Concentrating, entering and remaining in in the jhanas ( deep mental absorption states ) May We All Walk The Path To Nibbanic Bliss – To Ultimate Happiness and Perfect Peace Please Check Out The Following; http://www.slideshare.net/ohteikbin/a-road-to- ultimate-happiness
  36. 36. The Wonderful 5 Precepts 34 Precepts are moral Training Rules one undertakes to observe in walking the Spiritual Path. First Precept: No Killing I undertake the precept to refrain from killing or harming any living being. (I will act for the welfare and happiness of all beings.) Second Precept: No Stealing I undertake the precept to refrain from stealing or cheating. (I will be honest, generous, and take delight in giving and sharing.) Third Precept: No Sexual Misconduct I undertake the precept to refrain from sexual misconduct. (I will be honest and sincere in my relationship with others, nurturing true love and compassion.) Fourth Precept: No Lying I undertake the precept to refrain from lying, slandering, speaking maliciously, harshly and frivolously. (I will speak the truth, promote concord and friendship, speak kindly, gently and beneficially.) Fifth Precept: No Intoxicants I undertake the precept to refrain from taking alcohol and drugs which are harmful to the mind and body. (I will strive to keep my mind pure, clear, alert, mindful, and unconfused as much of the time as possible.)
  37. 37. Universal Prayer and Aspirations 35 May my thoughts, speech and action be good and wise throughout the day May I be strong in moments of weakness, courageous in times of trouble and calm in the face of changing fortunes May I always act with kindness, patience and forgiveness in my dealings with others, including those unfriendly to me May my family and I be well, happy and peaceful May all my relatives, friends and people of the world be well, happy and peaceful May my country and the world be blessed with peace and prosperity May Wisdom be at my head, Love in my heart and Compassion at my side to protect and guide me always May I have the opportunity today to help someone in need of my love and support
  38. 38. May I not waste this life in useless pursuits but use it to bring benefit and happiness to the world If I have strayed from the Path of Truth, Love, Compassion and Wisdom, may I never do so again If I have carelessly hurt someone today, by word or deed, may I be more mindful the next time Oh the Enlightened Ones, help me to set my heart right. May my actions reflect Your Love, Compassion and Wisdom I shall strive to cleanse my heart from hate and envy, and live in harmony with all people I shall be close to Truth or Righteousness, in good as well as in difficult times When the moment comes for me to leave the world, may I do so without fear or regret because I leave the world a better person than when I came into it Whatever wrong someone may do to me, may I be compassionate and forgive him or her, and bear no hatred in my heart 36
  39. 39. I shall not forget to be grateful for the acts of Love and Consideration shown to me, no matter how small they appear to be May this life be a blessing and a source of happiness to all beings May I realize The Truth in all its aspects, The Path in all its stages May I attain The Supreme Happiness, Peace, Bliss and Wisdom May we all grow in love and compassion May we all grow in peace and wisdom 37
  40. 40. The Kalama Sutta 38 (The Buddhist Charter of Free Inquiry) Do not believe in anything through revelation. Do not believe in anything through tradition handed down from the past. Do not believe in anything through hearsay. Do not believe in anything because it accords with the scriptures. Do not believe in anything through logic. Do not believe in anything because it is a point of view. Do not believe in anything through having considered the reasons. Do not believe in anything through the testimony of some reliable person. Do not believe in anything thinking, “This person is a respected preacher.” Kalamas, when you yourselves know what is bad, blameworthy and censured by the (enlightened) wise, Abandon those things. When you yourselves know that these things are good, not blameworthy, but praised by the wise, accept and practice them.
  41. 41. * Thousands of candles can be lit from a single candle, and the life of the candle will not be shortened. Happiness never decreases by being shared. * However many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them? * All things appear and disappear because of the concurrence of causes and conditions. Nothing ever exists entirely alone; everything is in relation to everything else. * The secret of health for both mind and body is not to mourn for the past, worry about the future, or anticipate troubles, but to live in the present moment wisely and earnestly. * Better than a thousand hollow words, is one word that brings peace. * Whatever words we utter should be chosen with care for people will hear them and be influenced by them for good or ill. 39
  42. 42. * Teach this triple truth to all: A generous heart, kind speech, and a life of service and compassion are the things which renew humanity. * Your worst enemy cannot harm you as much as your own unguarded thoughts. * Develop the mind of equilibrium. You will always be getting praise and blame, but do not let either affect the poise of the mind: follow the calmness, the absence of pride. * The virtuous man delights in this world, and he delights in the next; he delights in both. He delights and rejoices, when he sees the purity of his own work. * Fools of little understanding have themselves for their greatest enemies, for they do evil deeds which must bear bitter fruits. * Just as treasures are uncovered from the earth, so virtue appears from good deeds, and wisdom appears from a pure and peaceful mind. To walk safely through the maze of human life, one needs the light of wisdom and the guidance of virtue. * Not in the sky, not in the midst of the sea, not if we enter into the clefts of the mountains, is there known a spot in the whole world where death could not overcome the man. * If a man offends a harmless, pure, and innocent person, the evil falls back upon that fool, like light dust thrown up against the wind. 40
  43. 43. * As a solid rock is not shaken by the wind, so the wise are not shaken by blame and praise. As a deep lake is clear and calm, so the wise become tranquil after they listen to the Truth. * An insincere and evil friend is more to be feared than a wild beast; a wild beast may wound your body, but an evil friend will wound your mind. * Even death is not to be feared by one who has lived wisely. * There are only two mistakes one can make along the road to truth; not going all the way, and not starting. * All wrong-doing arises because of mind. If mind is transformed can wrong-doing remain? * Do not overrate what you have received, nor envy others. He who envies others does not obtain peace of mind. * Holding on to anger is like grasping a hot coal with the intent of throwing it at someone else; you are the one who gets burned. May we grow in Compassion and Wisdom May The Blessings Of The Triple Gem Be Upon You And Your Family 41
  44. 44. CREED FOR PBHP DYC PARTICIPANTS I’m a participant of the Dhamma Youth Camp …… Committed to the Vision Of promoting the growth of Buddhism and creating a better world For all sentient beings. I shall strive To create an environment Conducive for the study And practice of Dhamma. I shall give selfless service and the necessary support For more people to follow the Noble Path And realize their true potentials. And the Triple Gem I shall take As my daily guide and refuge. I shall be guided by wisdom and compassion And aspire for the highest Truth. This is my pledge to my Fellow Buddhists The Buddha Dhamma And Humanity. 42
  45. 45. Contemplation Before Meals 43 I take this food not for beauty or pleasure but for the sustenance of my body. With this food, I maintain my strength to seek the Truth. Just as my body needs material food for sustenance, even so should I constantly feed my mind with the food of Dhamma to grow in wisdom and compassion. May the Triple Gem, the source of inspiration be my guiding light. Contemplation After Meals I dedicate the positive merits I have generated to all beings. May I and those around me, now and in all our future lives, never be separated from the Triple Gem. May I continuously make offerings to the Triple Gem and receive deep inspiration from them. May those involved in the preparation of this food be blessed with good health, happiness and peace. The food I took relieved me from suffering of hunger for a while. I seek to overcome all forms of suffering completely. May I not forget or slacken in my effort to seek the Truth that releases me from all suffering. Sadhu! Sadhu! Sadhu!
  46. 46. Theme For 1st DYC 1993 ‘Good Heart, Clear Mind’ The Buddha Says… * Not harming living beings, not speaking lies, taking nothing in all the world unasked, nor going to the wives of other men, and never drinking intoxicants: One who gives up these five harmful acts and does not engage in them is truly called a virtuous man. * In every virtue all accomplished with wisdom full and mind composed, looking within and ever mindful – thus one crosses the raging flood. * To one who is without evil, always striving for purity, a wrong the size of a hair tip seems as big as a rain cloud. * The world is led around by mind; by mind the world is plagued. Mind is itself the single thing which brings all else beneath its sway. * Live without covetous greed, fill your mind with benevolence. Be mindful and one-pointed, inwardly stable and concentrated. * My mind is firm like a rock, unattached to sensual things, not shaking in the midst of a world where all is shaking. My mind has thus been well-developed, so how can suffering come to me? * No mother nor father nor any other kin can do greater good for oneself than a mind directed well. 44
  47. 47. Theme For 2nd DYC 1994 ‘Reaching Out, Looking In’ The Buddha Says… * Generosity, kind words, doing a good turn for others, and treating all people alike; these bonds of sympathy are to the world what the linchpin is to the chariot wheel. * Compassion is that which makes the heart of the good move at the pain of others; thus, it is called compassion. It is called compassion because it shelters and embraces the distressed. * May all creatures, all living things, all beings one and all, experience good fortunes only. May they not fall into harm. * Though he may conquer a thousand times, a thousand men in battle, yet he indeed is the noblest victor who would conquer himself. * Difficult to detect and very subtle, the mind seizes whatever it wants; so let a wise man guard his mind, for a guarded mind brings happiness. * Not excited by mental phenomena, one knows them through mindfulness; thus with a mind well detached, one understands and does not cling. * Possessed of persevering energy, practicing the Foundations of Mindfulness, bedecked with the blossoms of Freedom, you will be cooled and undefiled. 45
  48. 48. Theme For 3rd DYC 1995 ‘Walk The Dhamma Way’ The Buddha Says… * The good luck of virtue never fades; faith also brings great good. Wisdom is man’s most precious gem, merit no thief can ever steal. * Speak kind words, words rejoiced and welcomed, words that bear ill-will to none; always speak kindly to others. * Thoroughly understanding the Dhamma and freed of the longing through insight, the wise one rid of all desire is as calm as a pool unstirred by wind. * By doing evil, one defiles oneself; by avoiding evil, one purifies oneself. Purity and impurity depend upon oneself; no one can purify another. * Peaceful, quiet and restrained, speaking little, without conceit – such a one shakes off all evil as wind shakes leaves off a tree. * He who takes delight in harmlessness, sharing love with all that live, finds enmity with none. * The straight Path has been clearly shown; walk forward and don’t turn back. Urge yourself onwards by yourself; in that way attain Nibbana. * The flood is crossed by faith; by vigilance the sea is crossed; pain is overcome by vigour; by wisdom one is purified. 46
  49. 49. Theme For 4th DYC 1996 ‘Mind Matters, Love Conquers’ The Buddha Says… * When a man speaks or acts with good intentions, then happiness follows him like his shadow that never leaves him. * From meditation, wisdom arises; without meditation, wisdom wanes. * It is good to train the wandering mind. A mind under control brings great happiness. * He whose mind does not flutter by contact with worldly contingencies, sorrowless, stainless and secure – this is the Highest Blessing. * Hatred is never appeased by hatred; it is appeased by Love. This is an Eternal Law. * Just as a mother would protect her only child even at the risk of her own life, even so let one cultivate a boundless heart towards all beings. * A mind composed, well-concentrated, purified and undefiled, full of kindness towards all beings – this is the Way that leads to the Highest. * See yourself in others. Then whom can you hurt? What harm can you do? * A man is not noble if he injures any living creature. The noble man is gentle to all living creatures. 47
  50. 50. Theme For 5th DYC 1997 ‘Living Virtuously, Acting Mindfully’ The Buddha Says… * Here in the world one should train carefully to purify virtue; for virtue when well cultivated brings all success to hand. * Virtue is the foundation, the forerunner and origin of all that is good and beautiful; therefore one should purify virtue. * Virtue is a mighty power, virtue is a mighty weapon, virtue is the supreme adornment, virtue is a wonderful armour. * One is not low because of birth nor does birth make one holy. Deeds alone make one low, deeds only make one holy. * Train yourself in doing good that lasts and brings happiness. Cultivate generosity, the life of peace, and a mind of boundless love. * Even when the obstacles crowd in, the Path to Nibbana can be won by those who establish mindfulness and bring to perfection equipoise. * Knowing that the other person is angry, one who remains mindful and calm acts for his own best interest, too. * If your mind runs wild among sensual pleasure and things that arise, quickly restrain it with mindfulness as one pulls the cow from the corn. 48
  51. 51. Theme For 6th DYC 1998 49 ‘Right Vision, Good Action’ “Right Vision” * This is Right Understanding in the Buddhs’s Teaching. Primarily, it is an understanding of the Four Noble Truths: 1 The First Noble Truth of Dukkha or Unsatisfactoriness 2 The Second Noble Truth of the Cause of Dukkha 3 The Third Noble Truth of the Cessation of Dukkha 4 The Fourth Noble Truth of the Path leading to the cessation of Dukkha * Right Vision or View is the first aspect of the Noble Eightfold Path * In the practice of Dhamma, we must have Right Understanding of the basic things for example, The 3 Signs of Suffering, Impermanence, Non-Self; The Law of Kamma and Rebirth. “Good Action” * When we have Right Vision, then we will practice GOOD. We will lead a life of virtue. * As lay Buddhists, we should observe the Five Precepts: i ) No Killing ii ) No Stealing iii) No Sexual Misconduct iv ) No Lying v ) No Intoxicants * An important aspect of “Good Action” is the practice of DANA or Charity/Giving/Generosity
  52. 52. Theme For 7th DYC 1999 50 ‘Buddha My Guide, Dhamma My Light’ Buddha My Guide * I accept the Buddha as the highest ideal in life. * I honour and pay homage to the Buddha, The Blessed One, The Worthy One, The Fully Enlightened One * The Buddha is the Perfect Guide, the Perfect Teacher of gods and men. * The Buddha shows us the Way to Perfect Happiness, Peace, Bliss and Freedom. * The Buddha has realized the Ultimate Truth – the Truth that ends all suffering * We too can become Buddhas through practicing and realizing the Dhamma – The Teachings Of The Buddha * Let us cultivate the 10 Perfections of the fully Enlightened Buddha: Dana (Generosity), Sila (Morality), Nekkhamma (Renunciation), Panna (Wisdom), Viriya (Energy), Khanti (Patience), Sacca (Truthfulness), Adhitthana (Determination), Metta (Loving-Kindness), and Upekkha (Equanimity) Dhamma My Light * The Dhamma, The Teachings of The Buddha, is the Light that dispels the darkness of Ignorance or Delusion * I follow the Dhamma in my life. The Dhamma will lead me to overcome all problems, conflicts and suffering. * Through my learning, understanding, practicing and realizing the Four Noble Truths, I will attain Perfect Happiness and Bliss – NIBBANA
  53. 53. * The Four Noble Truths are: 51 1 The First Noble Truth of Suffering 2 The Second Noble Truth of the Cause of Suffering 3 The Third Noble Truth of the Cessation of Suffering 4 The Fourth Noble Truth of the Way leading to the Cessation of Suffering ( Noble Eightfold Path ) * The Noble Eightfold Path consists of - Right Understanding - Right Thought - Right Speech - Right Action - Right Livelihood - Right Effort - Right Mindfulness - Right Concentration * I practice the Dhamma with dedication, diligence and determination until I reach my Goal.
  54. 54. Theme For 8th DYC 2000 52 ‘Walk The Path With Heart’ Everybody wants to be perfectly happy and peaceful… The Buddha taught The Four Noble Truths… The First Noble Truth of Suffering The Second Noble Truth of the Cause of Suffering The Third Noble Truth of the Cessation of Suffering The Fourth Noble Truth of the Way or Path leading to the Cessation of Suffering ( The Middle Way or The Noble Eightfold Path ) The Supreme Goal of all Buddhists is Nibbana (the state of Perfect Happiness, Peace, Bliss and Freedom) To reach the Goal of Nibbana, we must follow The Noble Eightfold Path… The Noble Eightfold Path consists of… Right Understanding, Right Thought, Right Speech, Right Action, Right Livelihood, Right Effort, Right Mindfulness, Right Concentration. In following the Path, compassion is an integral aspect. We need to have a compassionate heart towards all beings. Only then can we eventually realize our Buddha Nature via Compassion and Wisdom In walking the Path, we are faced with all sorts of obstacles and hindrances such as the temptation of sensual desires, restlessness, mental laziness, boredom and so on. We have to walk The Noble Eightfold Path with a heart full of dedication, diligence and determination until we reach the Supreme Goal. Let us cultivate patience, understanding and mindfulness as we “Walk The Path With Heart”.
  55. 55. Theme For 9th DYC 2001 53 ‘Minding My Monkey Mind’ “Mind is the forerunner of all things. All that we are arises with our thoughts.” Buddha – Dhammapada Until we are Enlightened and completely liberated, our minds are defiled – filled with Greed, Hatred and Delusion. This gives rise to Dukkha or Suffering. It is imperative that we train our “monkey mind” and conquer: * Unwholesome Sensual Desire * Restlessness and Worry * Ill-will * Sloth and Torpor * Skepticism and Doubt The Buddha said, “It is good to control the mind. To master it brings happiness.” How subtle and elusive the mind is! The task is to quiet it – by ruling the mind, peace and happiness are found “With single-mindedness The Master quells His thoughts. He ends their wandering. Seated in the cave of the heart He finds Freedom.” Mindfulness is the Way to Peace, Bliss and Freedom. Train your mind to be awake; reflect and watch. Work with care and attention. Live in the Way – The Noble Eightfold Path – and the Light will grow in you. Let us make this Aspiration May I always live in the Dhamma Way and spend time Minding My Monkey Mind
  56. 56. Theme For 10th DYC 2002 54 ‘Sharing Dhamma, Speading Metta’ Dhamma refers to the Teaching of the Buddha. It is the Truth or the true nature of all things…all physical and mental phenomena. ‘The Gift Of Dhamma Excels All Other Gifts’. Hence to teach the Dhamma or to share the Dhamma with others is a most meritorious act of Dana or Charity. When one learns, understands, practices and realizes the Dhamma, one can - become more happy and peaceful - be more calm and tranquil - cope and solve problems and conflicts much better - grow in compassion and wisdom - cut one’s greed, hatred and delusion - have a good rebirth when one transits from this world - attain to the Bliss of Nibbana The central Teachings of the Buddha include the following: - The Four Noble Truths - The Noble Eightfold Path - The 3 Characteristics of Unsatisfactoriness, Impermanence and Non-Self - The Law of Kamma and Rebirth - The Law of Dependent Origination The promotion and propagation of Dhamma is the most noble and meritorious action. The Buddha exhorted His disciples to go forth to spread and share the Dhamma for the happiness and peace of all mankind. Let us all be Dhammafarers or Dhammaduta workers. Let our
  57. 57. commitment for the Dhamma cause grow and grow. 55 Metta is Loving-Kindness, a boundless and unconditioned love for all sentient beings. Metta is one of the four Brahma Viharas or Divine Abodes. This Sublime State brings benefits and happiness to oneself and others. The practice of Metta or Metta Bhavana (Meditation on Loving-Kindness) generates very good and wholesome Kamma. There are 11 benefits that one can obtain through the practice of Metta Bhavana. Our world today is filled with so much anger, aggression, ill- will, hatred, strife and enmity. It is indeed in need of loving- kindness and compassion. Let us spread Metta to all sentient beings. The Buddha said, “You should develop thoughts of love to friend and foe alike. And having reached perfection in love, you will attain Enlightenment.”
  58. 58. Theme For 11th DYC 2003 56 ‘Troubled Times, Dhamma Chimes’ Troubled Times * We are living in an age where there is much Dukkha – Suffering, Trouble, Conflicts, Problems, Physical and Mental Pain * Dukkha arises due to the Greed, Hatred and Delusion of Man * In the world today we can see or hear about so many negative happenings: natural calamities, wars and political conflicts, fatal diseases, stress and suicides, criminal and violent acts that besiege society, social ills like drug abuse etc. * More and more youths today have troubled minds in these troubled times. Dhamma Chimes * Dhamma refers to the Teachings of the Buddha or the understanding and realization of the true nature of all things – both physical and mental phenomena * ‘Chimes’ connotes ‘sweet ringing sounds’ * In such troubled times, all the more we need the ‘soothing’ messages of Dhamma – to learn, understand, practice and realize the Dhamma * Unless and until we follow the “Dhamma Chimes”, we cannot be really calm, peaceful and happy especially in these Troubled Times.
  59. 59. Theme For 12th DYC 2004 57 ‘Seeking Nature’s Peace And Bliss * Our world today is filled with trouble, problems, conflicts and natural disasters. * Despite all the scientific and technological advances, there is still so much DUKKHA or suffering. * We have interfered with and destroyed much of Nature – deforestation, pollution and ‘development’ projects rooted in greed and delusion. * In His search for Enlightenment, Siddhartha Gautama spent most of His time with or in Nature. He attained Enlightenment under the Bodhi Tree in the midst of Nature. He lived and preached the Dhamma mostly in an environment of Nature’s Peace. * It’s time we live more in harmony with Nature. One can attain much peacefulness and tranquility living in and appreciating the wonders of Nature. * The Peace and Bliss one can attain by being with Nature is truly beautiful and profound.
  60. 60. Theme For 13th DYC 2005 58 ‘Doing Good, Seeking Truth’ ‘Doing Good …’ • It is most important that we do good. The Law of Kamma essentially states : “Do good and good comes upon you; Do bad and bad comes upon you.” • An action is good if that action brings about peace, joy and happiness to oneself and others … it does not cause harm or suffering to oneself and others. • Good actions have their roots in generosity, kindness, compassion, mindfulness and wisdom. • A good Buddhist practices Sila or Morality. He follows the Five Precepts to his best ability. The Five Precepts are : * No killing * No stealing * No sexual misconduct * No lying * No intoxicants • Good actions like practicing Dana is most meritorious. Dana refers to generosity, charity and service to others out of kindness and compassion. ‘Seeking Truth …’ • More than 2500 years ago, Siddhartha Gautama left his worldly material possessions, wealth and luxuries in search of Truth …a Truth that will end all suffering, a Truth that leads man to perfect happiness, peace and freedom.
  61. 61. • To live meaningfully as a worthy human being, we need to fulfill a mission … a quest to seek and realize the Truth just as Siddhartha did … ( He attained Enlightenment … the mental state of complete bliss and freedom. ) • “Ehi passiko” ( ‘Come and See’) is a pertinent message in Buddhism. To learn, understand, practice and realize the Truth of the Dhamma is the greatest Treasure one can get in life. • There is an urgency for us to seek, learn and practice the Dhamma (Truth) … life is uncertain, death is certain. We must not waste this opportunity … to be born a human being is rare and privileged. Seeking and realizing Truth entails the practice of Dana ( Charity ), Sila ( Morality ) and Bhavana ( Meditation) 59
  62. 62. Theme For 14th DYC 2006 60 ‘Goodbye Samsara, Hello Nibbana’ “Goodbye Samsara” • ‘Samsara’ refers to the Realms of Birth and Death or the Cycle of rebirths. • As long as we are in Samsara, there is Dukkha – Suffering, Unsatisfactoriness, Problems, Conflict, Pain, Stress etc. • The Buddha essentially taught the Four Noble Truths , that is * The First Noble Truth - The Fact of Dukkha. * The Second Noble Truth – The Cause of Dukkha which is attachment and craving * The Third Noble Truth – The Cessation of Dukkha * The Fourth Noble Truth – The Path leading to the cessation of Dukkha. • As long as we are in Samsaric existence, we will have the mental defilements of Greed, Hatred and Delusion. • Unless and until we free ourselves from Samsara by getting rid of Greed, Hatred and Delusion, we will experience Dukkha in all its forms. • Let us start to say ‘Goodbye to Samsara’ by learning, understanding, practising and realizing the Dhamma. “Hello Nibbana” • Nibbana is the final goal of all Buddhists. • Nibbana is the unconditioned state of perfect happiness, peace and freedom.
  63. 63. • The Buddha taught that Dukkha ceases when Nibbana is attained. • The Way to Nibbana lies in the Noble Eightfold Path of Right Understanding, Right Thought, Right Speech, Right Action, Right Livelihood, Right Effort, Right Mindfulness and Right Concentration. • Nibbana is realized when we completely free our mind from any greed, anger or hatred and delusion. The Cycle of Birth and Death then comes to a stop ... we become Enlightened. • Let us walk The Path to Nibbana. Practise the Noble Eightfold Path. Observe the 5 Precepts of ‘No Killing. No Stealing. No Sexual Misconduct. No Lying. No Intoxicants.’ Practise Dana ( Charity ), Sila ( Morality ) and Bhavana ( Mental Cultivation ) . With this, we will be on the way to Nibbana. 61
  64. 64. Theme for 15th DYC 2007 62 ‘Ehipassiko – Life’s Lessons To Know’ * Ehipassiko literally means “Come and see”. * The Dhamma, The Teaching of the Buddha is not to be believed blindly ; it is not a set of beliefs or doctrines based on blind faith, superstitions, traditions or untested ‘philosophical principles’. * One has to ‘come and see’ the Dhamma – to listen, to read about it first, to try to understand and reflect on it, to question and investigate for oneself, to put the Dhamma teachings into practice to validate them … and when one actualizes the Dhamma in the mind or realizes it, one KNOWS … the question of blind belief has no place then. * Ehipassiko is tied up with a Discourse the Buddha taught, namely The Kalama Sutta, a Charter of Free Inquiry. * In the Kalama Sutta, The Buddha said : “ Come, Kalamas, Do not go upon what has been acquired by repeated hearing, nor upon tradition, nor upon rumor, nor upon scripture, nor upon surmise, nor upon axiom, nor upon specious reasoning, nor upon bias towards a notion pondered over, nor upon another’s seeming ability, nor upon the consideration “The monk is our teacher.” When you yourselves know: “These things are bad, blamable, censured by the wise; undertaken and observed, these things lead to harm and ill,” abandon them … When you yourselves know: “These things are good, blameless, praised by the wise; undertaken and observed, these things lead to benefit and happiness,” enter on and abide in them.
  65. 65. * The most important lessons of life lie in the Dhamma, which also refers to Truth, The Way things really are, the Universal Laws that govern all physical and mental phenomena. * When one learns, understands, practices and realizes the Dhamma, one develops compassion and wisdom and then one will eventually attain happiness, peace, bliss and freedom of the mind. * The most important Life’s Lesson lies in the Four Noble Truths, that is 1. The First Noble Truth – The Noble Truth of Dukkha 2. The Second Noble Truth – The Noble Truth of The Cause of Dukkha 3. The Third Noble Truth – The Noble Truth of the Cessation of Dukkha 4. The Fourth Noble Truth – The Noble Truth of The Path leading to the end of Dukkha. * The Fourth Noble Truth is the Noble Eightfold Path which is made up of (a) Right Understanding (b) Right Thought (c) Right Speech (d) Right Action (e) Right Livelihood (f) Right Effort (g) Right Mindfulness (h) Right Concentration 63
  66. 66. Theme for 16th DYC 2008 64 ‘Noble Thoughts, Righteous Ways’ There are two key words in this year’s DYC Theme “Noble Thoughts, Righteous Ways” Noble – arising from superiority of mind or character (Distinguishing qualities of a person) Righteous – acting rightly; upright; according to what is right. From the theme song of the PBHP 16th DYC, we can know more about Dhamma and the practice. Here are the explanatory notes on the 16th DYC Theme Song In noble thoughts and righteous ways, live by the Dhamma… This implies the importance of inculcating thoughts that are noble and behavior or actions that are righteous or blameless in our daily lives as practicing Buddhists. The Noble Truths, the Eightfold Way are the guiding stars The essence of the Buddha’s Teachings is often summarized into ‘Suffering and the cessation of suffering’. The Noble Truths and the Eightfold Way when properly understood and practiced will lead us out of the cycles of birth and death thus ending suffering. They are therefore the guiding stars which show us the way out of samsara. His voice resounds in the Suttas Although the Buddha passed away more than 2500 years ago, His Teachings are preserved in the sacred suttas. When we read and study the suttas, it’s like hearing the voice of the Buddha again and again, as though the Buddha is alive and
  67. 67. preaching endlessly. We should therefore cherish those teachings and use them to help us become Enlightened Beings. Within this very lifetime let’s find the fairer day…. Many teachers have taught that Enlightenment can be attained within one life-time. Let’s strive towards that. Who knows, some of you might be the fortunate ones! Rejoicing in true freedom where karma melts away Our karma follows as like a shadow into our subsequent rebirths. Our karma causes us to be reborn. What happens when karma exists no more? No more rebirths…no more suffering…freedom from being reborn…isn’t that true freedom to be rejoiced upon? Facing the dualities of life, take it all in your stride. The Buddha taught us the dualities in life – loss and gain, praise and blame, pleasure and pain, fame and shame. In life all of us have to face the dualities. We have no choice but to accept them as part and parcel of human existence and overcome them using the Dhamma. When seas are high with thunderous skies… For some, life is quite smooth and easy…for others, life can be extremely miserable. However, at one time or another, the sweetness of life can turn bitter due to unfortunate, inexplicable circumstances. So what are we going to do? Imagine yourself in a little boat in very high seas (waves) with thunder and lightning in stormy weather! We have no choice but to cultivate our minds and be in full control allaying our fears until the storm is over. We can survive (i.e. overcome or endure our hardship) by abiding in the Teachings of the Buddha. 65
  68. 68. Theme for 17th DYC 2009 66 ‘Open Heart, Radiant Mind’ What does it mean to have an open heart and a radiant mind? To have an open heart means to have unconditional, non- discriminating, free-flowing love. To have love for others that is equal to love for oneself. With that kind of love, your heart will be filled with great compassion and generosity to do things which are equally beneficial to yourself and others. Now, what is meant by a radiant mind? Radiant means showing great happiness and love. Imagine a person with open heart and radiant mind; what sort of person would that be? (Must be a very kind-hearted, very helpful, very understanding, knowledgeable, loving, lovable, calm, peaceful and happy person. ) Wouldn’t you wish to be such a person or to be in the company of such a person? Wouldn’t the world be a more pleasant place if there are more people with open heart and radiant mind Em, em Ok. Let’s look at some of the lyrics in the theme song. The Buddha’s Teachings…what did the Buddha teach? Practically the whole teaching of the Buddha deals in some way or other with the Noble Eightfold Path which can be grouped into: (a) Ethical conduct (Sila) – Right Speech, Right Action, Right Livelihood (b) Mental Discipline (Samadhi) – Right Effort, Right Mindfulness, Right Concentration
  69. 69. ( c ) Wisdom (Panna) – Right Thought, Right Understanding Let’s sing in praise and thank the Lord… Why? How? Whenever you can…observe the breath… Because He showed us how to escape from this suffering state that we live in. In the thousands of discourses, He urged us to meditate and practice the Dhamma and discover for ourselves what He had discovered. For that we are grateful and thankful. May this Theme serve as a little reminder of what is good and as a motivation for us to love , to serve and to learn and practice the Dhamma to the highest level. Sadhu! Sadhu! Sadhu! 1 67
  70. 70. Theme For 18th DYC 2010 68 ‘A Path To Peace And Bliss’ The Buddha taught The Four Noble Truths. They are: * The First Noble Truth of Dukkha or Suffering * The Second Noble Truth of the Cause of Suffering * The Third Noble Truth of the Ending of Suffering * The Fourth Noble Truth of The Path leading to the End of Suffering For a very, very long time we have been living many lives in Samsara, the cycle of birth, death and rebirth. We have lived and are living through experiences of problems, pain, conflict and suffering. None of us is free from the eight worldly conditions of pleasure and pain, gain and loss, praise and blame, honor and dishonor. Our worldly pleasures and happiness can never last…they will eventually fade away. Each of us must go through birth, ageing, sicknesses and death as long as we are unenlightened worldly beings. Suffering and pain is inevitable. The root cause of all our suffering is ignorance and craving or grasping. We crave for things and people and don’t get them; we meet with things and people we don’t want to; our loved possessions will finally leave us; our loved ones will eventually be separated from us. All these will cause much pain and suffering to us. The temporary pleasures we enjoy with our senses from time to time are not the real or true happiness or peace we seek. The highest happiness that is true peace and happiness is Nibbana. This is the ultimate goal of all Buddhists.
  71. 71. Theme For 19th DYC 2011 69 ‘Mindful Ways, Peaceful Days’ ‘Mindful Ways’ • To be mindful means to be aware, attentive, heedful, and to know what is happening in the mind moment to moment. • The mindful person has a mind that is alert; he or she remembers the things learnt; he is not careless or heedless in his thoughts, speech and bodily actions. • Right Mindfulness or Samma Sati is one of the 8 factors in the Buddha’s Noble Eightfold Path, the Way that leads one to Nibbana, the State of perfect happiness, peace and freedom of the mind. • The Four Foundations of Mindfulness are: * mindfulness of the body * mindfulness of feelings (or sensations) * mindfulness of mind (or consciousness) * mindfulness of mental objects • The practice of the four foundations of mindfulness leads one to insight and wisdom into the real nature of things. Dukkha or suffering will then be completely ended. ‘Peaceful Days’ • When one is unmindful, heedless and careless, one meets with a lot of problems, stress, conflicts and suffering.
  72. 72. * A peaceful mind is one free from unhappiness, stress and tension. The mind is happy, contented, tranquil and steady. • A person with a peaceful mind has a peaceful living. He is in harmony within himself, with the environment and with others. • To have a peaceful life, one must be mindful to avoid the ten unwholesome kamma. Practice 1 No killing 2 No stealing 3 No sexual misconduct 4 No lying 5 No slander 6 No harsh speech 7 No gossip 8 No covetousness 9 No Ill-will 10 No wrong views • To have peacefulness, one must remember to practice the ten meritorious deeds, that is, 1 Charity 2 Morality 3 Mental Culture 4 Reverence or respect 5 Service in helping others 6 Sharing merits with others 7 Rejoicing in the merits of others 8 Preaching and teaching the Dhamma 9 Listening to the Dhamma 10 Straightening views May we be always mindful. Then we will be happy, free and peaceful! 70
  73. 73. 71 Theme For The 20th DYC 2012 In The Master’s Steps Prince Siddhartha was born in Lumbini in 623 B.C. Receiving an excellent education, he married at 16 and had a son. When he was 29, after reflecting on the Four Sights of an old man, a sick man, a dead man and a peaceful mendicant, he realized the fleeting and unsatisfactory nature of life; he resolved to renounce his worldly life in search of peace and Truth. It was out of compassion for all the suffering of all beings in Samsara. After an arduous course of mental training for six strenuous years, he attained Supreme Enlightenment – He was 35 years old. He had found the Way to Perfect Happiness, Peace and Freedom. For 45 years, the Buddha expounded the Dhamma. He taught the Four Noble Truths: * The 1st Noble Truth of Dukkha or Unsatisfactoriness * The 2nd Noble Truth of The Cause of Dukkha * The 3rd Noble Truth of The Cessation of Dukkha * The 4th Noble Truth of The Path leading to the Cessation of Dukkha With compassion and wisdom, the Buddha diligently worked for the good and happiness of Mankind until His dying moment. His parting words are profound and important: “….Be diligent, mindful, and extremely virtuous. With thoughts collected, guard your mind. In this Doctrine and Discipline, by living strenuously, you will escape the cycle of rebirth and put an end to suffering.
  74. 74. Think not that you have no Teacher after my Death. Regard the Dhamma and Vinaya I have taught you as your Teacher. He who practices My Teachings best serves Me most. He who sees the Dhamma sees Me. Transient are all component things; strive on with diligence.” The Buddha passed into Parinibbana at Kusinara. He was 80 years of age. Brothers and Sisters in the Dhamma: In a world of troubled times, a world where there is so much suffering, let us resolve to Walk In The Master’s Steps … in an ardent, patient and determined quest to seek real happiness, peace and liberation of the mind and to attain the final Goal of Nibbana. The Path leading to the Cessation of all Suffering is The Noble Eightfold Way of * Right Understanding, Right Thought ( Wisdom ) * Right Speech, Right Action, Right Livelihood ( Morality ) * Right Effort, Right Concentration, Right Mindfulness ( Concentration ) To inspire and motivate us to walk in the Master’s Steps, let us reflect on what the Buddha said in Anguttara Nikaya: * We are all subject to ageing * We are all subject to sickness * We are all subject to death * There will be change and separation from all that we hold dear and near to us * We are the owners of our Kamma or actions, heir of our actions. We are born of our actions. We are related to our actions and we have our actions as refuge. Whatever we do, good or evil, of that, we will be the heir. May We Walk In The Master’s Steps Towards The Goal of Enlightenment! 72
  75. 75. hefty household bills of all sorts we need to pay monthly. When we are all burdened with unnecessary commitments, we have little time for so may important things that really matter in life – learning about and developing the mind, showing kindness to others, rendering services to the needy, spending time with our loved ones and cultivating our spirituality. We lead our lives as if they will not end; we fail to realize that life is uncertain and death is certain. The gratitude we owe our parents is tremendous. It’s indeed sad that many children abandon their parents or give little attention and care to their parents. Reason? They are in deep ‘busy-ness’. Filial piety and gratitude are among the virtues we need to practice if we wish to realize true happiness and peace. 73 Anthem Of Unity In unity we stand In harmony we strive The Cause shall never end As long as we’re alive We’re One ( We’re One ) Always ( Always ) We’re One always One Cause, One Cause Enfolding us Along Dhamma’s Way One Cosmic Brotherhood One purpose moulding us Bringing us all to good Kindling the Light in us Strive on ( Strive On ) Heedfully ( Heedfully ) Strive on heedfully… Along, along the Eightfold Way To Nirvana’s Day Music Victor Wee Lyrics Piyasilo 1st DYC 1993 Theme Song FortheSong,pleasecheckoutthefollowing: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iYutOwiJYZA
  76. 76. hefty household bills of all sorts we need to pay monthly. When we are all burdened with unnecessary commitments, we have little time for so may important things that really matter in life – learning about and developing the mind, showing kindness to others, rendering services to the needy, spending time with our loved ones and cultivating our spirituality. We lead our lives as if they will not end; we fail to realize that life is uncertain and death is certain. The gratitude we owe our parents is tremendous. It’s indeed sad that many children abandon their parents or give little attention and care to their parents. Reason? They are in deep ‘busy-ness’. Filial piety and gratitude are among the virtues we need to practice if we wish to realize true happiness and peace. 74 Reaching Out, Looking In We care, we give and share With all the faith we have Let Buddha be the Light That dispels ignorance Let’s hold each other’s hands In unity we stand With harmony we strive May Dhamma be our Guide Chorus: Open our hearts and mind Look in and try to find In this wheel of life… Reach out and lend a hand Look in, see the Blessed Path There’s peace within our hearts… ( Repeat Chorus: ) We care, we give and share With all the faith we have Let Buddha be the Light That dispels ignorance Let’s hold each other’s hands In unity we stand With harmony we strive May Dhamma be our Guide With harmony we strive May Dhamma be our Guide Music Hor Su Wei, & Mary Hor Lyrics Wendy Hor & Penny Hor 2nd DYC 1994 Theme Song FortheSong,pleasecheckoutthefollowing: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ykKh1t7PbvE
  77. 77. hefty household bills of all sorts we need to pay monthly. When we are all burdened with unnecessary commitments, we have little time for so may important things that really matter in life – learning about and developing the mind, showing kindness to others, rendering services to the needy, spending time with our loved ones and cultivating our spirituality. We lead our lives as if they will not end; we fail to realize that life is uncertain and death is certain. The gratitude we owe our parents is tremendous. It’s indeed sad that many children abandon their parents or give little attention and care to their parents. Reason? They are in deep ‘busy-ness’. Filial piety and gratitude are among the virtues we need to practice if we wish to realize true happiness and peace. 75 Walk The Dhamma Way In the still of the night The world is sleeping peacefully In the sky little friendly stars Twinkle merrily How fragrant are the blossoms offered To the Blessed One Serenade Lord Buddha in all His glory Chorus: Sorrow no more Let the true Buddha in us shine thru Let not our minds be lost in Samsara It’s true that life is not always that easy But keep on trying We only have to walk the Dhamma Way Dawn is breaking Sunny rays send darkness on the run Like the sun the Dhamma brings Light and Truth to our lives Let us not sleep the days away! Wake up and listen now The voice of Buddha echoes through the land Repeat Chorus Music Hor Su Wei, Hor Sue Lin & Mary Hor Lyrics Suellen Teh 3rd DYC 1995 Theme Song FortheSong,pleasecheckoutthefollowing: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b8SEdNvEJDI
  78. 78. hefty household bills of all sorts we need to pay monthly. When we are all burdened with unnecessary commitments, we have little time for so may important things that really matter in life – learning about and developing the mind, showing kindness to others, rendering services to the needy, spending time with our loved ones and cultivating our spirituality. We lead our lives as if they will not end; we fail to realize that life is uncertain and death is certain. The gratitude we owe our parents is tremendous. It’s indeed sad that many children abandon their parents or give little attention and care to their parents. Reason? They are in deep ‘busy-ness’. Filial piety and gratitude are among the virtues we need to practice if we wish to realize true happiness and peace. Mind Matters, Love Conquers Great is the power of the mind But it must be guided well With the light of the Triple Gem Open our minds and hearts We all have to love And to see things as they are Chorus: Let love grow And let the anger go Conquer hate Let us live in peace and harmony Oh……. Let love grow And let the anger go Conquer hate Let us live in peace and harmony Oh! Mind matters and love conquers Thoughts are created by the mind Let’s fill the thoughts with love For all living beings Be they wealthy or poor Whether little or old Be they wise or ignorant Chorus: Boundless is the love shown by Lord Buddha He’s really holy and wise Let us all follow His teachings To purify our minds To have love in our hearts ‘cause Mind Matters, Love Conquers Chorus: Let our love shine throughout the world Music Bro. Tan Lee Yew Lyrics Bro. Teoh Kean Lip 4th DYC 1996 Theme Song FortheSong,pleasecheckoutthefollowing: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c_Vkxls5PQA 76
  79. 79. hefty household bills of all sorts we need to pay monthly. When we are all burdened with unnecessary commitments, we have little time for so may important things that really matter in life – learning about and developing the mind, showing kindness to others, rendering services to the needy, spending time with our loved ones and cultivating our spirituality. We lead our lives as if they will not end; we fail to realize that life is uncertain and death is certain. The gratitude we owe our parents peace. Living Virtuously, 77 Acting Mindfully There is a light on the horizon It’s the starting of a new day Come and seize the moment Before it slips away # There is so much living to do Forget the past and future Come and see the rainbow before it disappears * Life is dear and short Now is all we’ve got Let us all practice the Dhamma Living Virtuously, Acting Mindfully Chorus We share in the beauty of life In the light of Dhamma Together we strive We share in the ocean of tears In the light of Dhamma We have no fears ( We all have no fears ) Repeat #, * and Chorus Life is uncertain Now is all we’ve got Live with virtue and mindfulness Together we strive for happiness Repeat : Chorus Music Bro. Tan Lee Yew Lyrics Bro. Teoh Kean Lip 5th DYC 1997 Theme Song FortheSong,pleasecheckoutthefollowing: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FIBgEmgMc8M
  80. 80. hefty household bills of all sorts we need to pay monthly. When we are all burdened with unnecessary commitments, we have little time for so may important things that really matter in life – learning about and developing the mind, showing kindness to others, rendering services to the needy, spending time with our loved ones and cultivating our spirituality. We lead our lives as if they will not end; we fail to realize that life is uncertain and death is certain. The gratitude we owe our parents is tremendous. It’s indeed sad that many children abandon their parents or give little attention and care to their parents. Reason? They are in deep ‘busy-ness’. Filial piety and gratitude are among the virtues we need to practice if we wish to realize Right Vision, Good Action 78 The world is made up of everything And everything makes the world we live in In ignorance we live But with Dhamma Light we know That we are all friends in Samsara There is beauty in all of us A beauty only few can see and touch In the darkness we dwell But with Dhamma Light we see That we are all friends in Samsara Chorus Right Vision…we need this so dearly Have a heart that can see The right from the wrong and good from bad Good Action…to the unfortunate ones Free your mind And Truth will follow with no more sorrow The stars shine their brightest at night We’ll succeed if we try with all our might To wash away the dust Let us strive on hand in hand With the Buddha’s guide together we can Repeat Chorus Music Bro. Tan Lee Yew Lyrics Bro. Teoh Kean Lip 6th DYC 1998 Theme Song FortheSong,pleasecheckoutthefollowing: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U3gbyGSrnx4
  81. 81. hefty household bills of all sorts we need to pay monthly. When we are all burdened with unnecessary commitments, we have little time for so may important things that really matter in life – learning about and developing the mind, showing kindness to others, rendering services to the needy, spending time with our loved ones and cultivating our spirituality. We lead our lives as if they will not end; we fail to realize that life is uncertain and death is certain. The gratitude we owe our parents is tremendous. It’s indeed sad that many children abandon their parents or give little attention and care to their parents. Reason? They are in deep ‘busy-ness’. Filial piety and gratitude are among the virtues we need to practice if we wish to realize true happiness and peace. Buddha My Guide, 79 Dhamma My Light * Sometimes the world can get you down It’s hard to see things clearly All your smiles turn to a frown All thoughts you think bitterly Sometimes the night may seem so long And morning seems so far away You feel like you don’t belong And wish you could run away Let the Buddha be your Guide Let Him be your Light Let the Dhamma be your Guide Let It be your Light Let the Buddha be your Guide Let the Dhamma be your Light In the Buddha and Dhamma we have faith* Don’t you ever think of giving up The Gem that you have inside Don’t you ever think of giving up For the pain will subside Don’t you ever think of giving up The search for Enlightenment For eventually, it will be found Repeat * * Let the Buddha be your Guide Let the Dhamma be your Light The joy we feel is truly great Music Seow Shi Ling & Ong Sing Yee Lyrics Bro. Teoh Kean Lip 7th DYC 1999 Theme Song FortheSong,pleasecheckoutthefollowing: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uqux23OZ2YU

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