Meeting the Needs of All Students in the Classroom: Exploring Integrated Delivery Systems -Handout2 programmodels

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June 27, 9 – 11:30am, Room: Union A
Based on the work of Dr. Elise Frattura from University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, this session will explore how to develop an integrated service delivery system that addresses the needs of all students, including those who have been marginalized, with a focus on students with disabilities. This session will look at some of the major problems caused by providing separate programs and classrooms for disabled students. Examining your current district, building or classroom, you will explore how to align your own delivery of highly effective practices in an integrated setting.
Main Presenter: Candi Hazelwood, Consultant, Education Service Center of Cuyahoga County
Co-Presenter(s): Peg Deibel, Consultant, State Support Team Region 9; Helen Flowers, Consultant, State Support Team Region 15; Becky Rees, Consultant, State Support Team Region 6

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Meeting the Needs of All Students in the Classroom: Exploring Integrated Delivery Systems -Handout2 programmodels

  1. 1. Why Program Models Don’t Work Capper and Frattura, 2007Problems with programs: 1. Separate programs perpetuate tracking of students of color and lower socioeconomic status and SWD. 2. Separate programs are quite costly. 3. A lot of time and money spent getting students to qualify for program (i.e a district spends thousands to qualify SWD.) 4. Separate programs allows some students to receive service and others not. 5. Separate programs fragment a student’s day. 6. Separate programs drain staff energy and give message to students that they do not belong. 7. Separate programs serve as an enabling function, the “fix” rather than looking for prevention. 8. Special programs lack transfer of student knowledge and skills Why Program Models Don’t Work Capper and Frattura, 2007Problems with programs: 1. Separate programs perpetuate tracking of students of color and lower socioeconomic status and SWD. 2. Separate programs are quite costly. 3. A lot of time and money spent getting students to qualify for program (i.e a district spends thousands to qualify SWD.) 4. Separate programs allows some students to receive service and others not. 5. Separate programs fragment a student’s day. 6. Separate programs drain staff energy and give message to students that they do not belong. 7. Separate programs serve as an enabling function, the “fix” rather than looking for prevention. 8. Special programs lack transfer of student knowledge and skills

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