Week One Lecture Part 1

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Week One Lecture Part 1

  1. 1. LIGHTING DESIGN Instructor: Deborah Ogden
  2. 2. DO YOU HAVE ANY ROOMS WITH A SINGLE LIGHT SOURCE?
  3. 3. <ul><li>Rooms with a single source of light: unflattering! </li></ul><ul><li>Single source lighting is harsh and contrast-y </li></ul>
  4. 4. LAYERED LIGHTING IS SOFTER, MORE NATURAL, AND MORE PLEASING
  5. 5. <ul><li>Focus is on art and floral arrangement </li></ul><ul><li>Light sources are concealed </li></ul><ul><li>Texture of wood and wall highlighted </li></ul><ul><li>Room appears inviting </li></ul>
  6. 6. CREATING A DRAMATIC FOCAL POINT IS ONE FUNCTION OF LIGHTING
  7. 7. <ul><li>What is highlighted in this room? </li></ul><ul><li>The table top is noticed first </li></ul><ul><li>Then the plant in background, and then area near window </li></ul>
  8. 8. LIGHTING CAN HELP CREATE AN ILLUSION
  9. 11. <ul><li>(cove lighting used on previous slide) </li></ul>
  10. 12. <ul><li>These pools of light create drama and interest by highlighting the stone floor </li></ul><ul><li>They also subtly direct the viewer to the next room </li></ul>
  11. 13. <ul><li>Accent lights draw attention to art or architecture </li></ul>
  12. 14. <ul><li>Notice the spot shining above the fireplace? </li></ul><ul><li>On the tree? </li></ul><ul><li>On the statue on the far wall? </li></ul><ul><li>Lamp on the end table? </li></ul>
  13. 15. <ul><li>Spots on stone, beams, hearth, dining table </li></ul><ul><li>Highlight texture and shadow with wall-washers </li></ul>
  14. 16. <ul><li>Up-lights on glass table– </li></ul><ul><li>with glass art objects </li></ul>
  15. 17. Architecture highlighted: Lighting in shelf area, spot over fireplace, down-lights on sofa tables
  16. 18. <ul><li>Lighting is ideal for creating ceiling interest </li></ul><ul><li>Plant shadows are one way to bring in some lighting “texture” </li></ul><ul><li>Picture light, lamps, up-light in plant, spot on round table </li></ul>
  17. 19. Now that is a bedroom ceiling! This could be built into any high-ceilinged room…Note the cove lighting
  18. 20. <ul><li>A restaurant ceiling with cove lighting and gold leaf </li></ul><ul><li>See the ceiling spots? </li></ul><ul><li>Table lamps? </li></ul><ul><li>Torchiere? </li></ul>
  19. 21. Avoid the “black mirror” effect by placing lighting on objects outside a glass wall or door
  20. 23. THERE ARE THREE MAIN TYPES OF LIGHTING: TASK LIGHTING AMBIENT LIGHTING ACCENT LIGHTING
  21. 24. <ul><li>Task lighting is focused and specific lighting </li></ul><ul><li>Task lighting is not intended to light an entire room </li></ul>
  22. 25. Bedside task light can be wall or table lamps. Measure height of the seated user’s eye level, and place opaque shades just above shoulder, or place the center of a translucent shade at their eye level.
  23. 26. A single center-mounted ceiling light is often not a good task light. In this case, the user’s body blocks the light from shining on the task area.
  24. 27. Track lighting and down-lights also need to be placed where they will shine on the task and not on those performing the task.
  25. 28. Under-cabinet lighting mounted at the front of the cabinet bounces light off the backsplash and onto the countertop—the task area
  26. 29. Lighting a counter and backsplash made from glossy material takes extra care--to avoid glare and veiling reflections: mount adjustable recessed luminaires to give cross-illumination
  27. 30. Another example of a single source of light giving harsh shadows and no “fill” light
  28. 31. Linear task lights mounted near the back of the upper cabinet create a distracting glare for a seated diner—mount at front and use a fascia strip
  29. 32. <ul><li>Sconces are a good source of task light and “fill” light in a bathroom </li></ul>

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