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Team Management Models by Operational Excellence Consulting

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This presentation is a collection of PowerPoint diagrams and templates used to convey 26 different Team Management models and frameworks.

INCLUDED MODELS/FRAMEWORKS:

1. Mintzberg's Management Roles Model
2. Butler & Waldroop's Four Dimensions of Relational Work Model
3. Lencioni's Five Dysfunctions of a Team
4. Birkinshaw's Four Dimensions of Management Framework
5. Waldroop & Butler's Six Problem Behaviors
6. The GRPI Model
7. Tuckman's Model of Team Development Stages
8. Cog's Ladder: A Model for Group Development
9. Belbin's Team Roles Model
10. The JD-R Model
11. Margerison-McCann Team Management Profile
12. Blanchard & Thacker's Training Needs Analysis Framework
13. The ADDIE Model
14. The Conscious Competence Learning Model
15. Kirkpatrick's Four-Level Training Evaluation Model
16. Heron's Six Categories of Intervention
17. The Emotional Competence Framework
18. The Nine-Box Grid for Talent Management
19. The GROW Model
20. Gibb's Reflective Cycle
21. Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs
22. Hertzberg's Motivators & Hygiene Factors
23. The Johari Window
24. Lewin's Three Stage Change Model
25. Kotter's Eight Phases of Change
26. De Bono's Six Thinking Hats

To download this presentation, go to http://www.oeconsulting.com.sg

Published in: Business

Team Management Models by Operational Excellence Consulting

  1. 1. © Operational Excellence Consulting. All rights reserved. This presentation is a collection of PowerPoint diagrams and templates used to convey 26 different Team Management models and frameworks. Team Management Models Diagrams and Templates of Team Management Models and Frameworks
  2. 2. © Operational Excellence Consulting. All rights reserved. 2 Contents 1. Mintzberg’s Management Roles Model 2. Butler & Waldroop’s Four Dimensions of Relational Work Model 3. Lencioni’s Five Dysfunctions of a Team 4. Birkinshaw’s Four Dimensions of Management Framework 5. Waldroop & Butler’s Six Problem Behaviors 6. The GRPI Model 7. Tuckman’s Model of Team Development Stages 8. Cog’s Ladder: A Model for Group Development 9. Belbin’s Team Roles Model 10. The JD-R Model 11. Margerison-McCann Team Management Profile 12. Blanchard & Thacker’s Training Needs Analysis Framework 13. The ADDIE Model NOTE: This is a PARTIAL PREVIEW. To download the complete presentation, please visit: http://www.oeconsulting.com.sg
  3. 3. © Operational Excellence Consulting. All rights reserved. 3 Contents 14. The Conscious Competence Learning Model 15. Kirkpatrick’s Four-Level Training Evaluation Model 16. Heron’s Six Categories of Intervention 17. The Emotional Competence Framework 18. The Nine-Box Grid for Talent Management 19. The GROW Model 20. Gibb’s Reflective Cycle 21. Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs 22. Hertzberg’s Motivators & Hygiene Factors 23. The Johari Window 24. Lewin’s Three-Stage Change Model 25. Kotter’s Eight Phases of Change 26. De Bono’s Six Thinking Hats
  4. 4. © Operational Excellence Consulting. All rights reserved. 4 Mintzberg’s Management Roles Model defines ten essential roles or behaviors that managers play in an organization Mintzberg’s Management Roles Model Source: Henry Mintzberg Category Roles Interpersonal • Figurehead • Leader • Liaison Informational • Monitor • Disseminator • Spokesperson Decisional • Entrepreneur • Disturbance Handler • Resource Allocator • Negotiator
  5. 5. © Operational Excellence Consulting. All rights reserved. 5 The “Four Dimensions of Relational Work” can help you match team members’ natural aptitudes and skills to specific tasks or projects Butler & Waldroop’s Four Dimensions of Relational Work Model Source: Timothy Butler & James Waldroop Influence Interpersonal facilitation Relational creativity Team leadership
  6. 6. © Operational Excellence Consulting. All rights reserved. 6 Lencioni’s Five Dysfunctions of a Team DESCRIPTION  The pursuit of individual goals and personal status erodes the focus on collective success.  The need to avoid interpersonal discomfort prevents team members from holding one another accountable.  The lack of clarity or buy-in prevents team members from making decisions they will stick to.  The desire to preserve artificial harmony stifles the occurrence of productive ideological conflict.  The fear of being vulnerable with team members prevents the building of trust within the team. Inattention to Results Avoidance of Accountability Lack of Commitment Fear of Conflict Absence of Trust Source: Patrick Lencioni Patrick Lencioni’s Model
  7. 7. © Operational Excellence Consulting. All rights reserved. 7 The Four Dimensions of Management framework can be used to develop a more effective management model that suits your strategy and business practices Birkinshaw’s Four Dimensions of Management Framework Source: Julian Birkinshaw Managing Across: Activities Managing Down: Decisions Managing Objectives Managing Individual Motivation Bureaucracy Alignment Hierarchy Extrinsic Emergence Intrinsic Obliquity Collective Wisdom Traditional Alternative Dimension Principles
  8. 8. © Operational Excellence Consulting. All rights reserved. 8 The GRPI Model can clarify your team’s purpose, set priorities, increase efficiency, and identify and prevent potential problems The GRPI Model Source: Richard Beckhard Clear direction Shared values Sense of purpose Defined responsibilities Clear ‘rules’ for working together Understanding of what each other does Clear communication Decision-making authority Dispute management Trust Mutual support Genuine friendliness Goals Roles Interpersonal Relationships Processes
  9. 9. © Operational Excellence Consulting. All rights reserved. 9 Tuckman’s Model of Team Developmental Stages for Small Groups Forming  Team members meet each other  Team members learn about the task  All team members learn what their roles will be Storming Norming Performing  Team members learn how to work together  Team members learn about other member’s abilities  Leader focuses the team  Team starts to work and act together  Roles evolve into helping the team succeed  Team members are more likely to express opinions  Team members work hard toward goal  Members are flexible and help each other  Leader’s role is blurred – everyone is focused Source: Adapted from Bruce W. Tuckman Tuckman’s Model of Team Development Stages
  10. 10. © Operational Excellence Consulting. All rights reserved. 10 The Cog’s Ladder profiles successful group work as a linear progression with five identifiable stages Cog’s Ladder Source: George O. Charrier Why We’re Here Stage Co-operation Stage Esprit Stage Bid For Power Stage Polite Stage Getting acquainted, sharing information, holding back, seeking approval, hidden agendas, low conflict, etc. Clarifying purposes, sharing values, forming cliques, some risk-taking, questioning, etc. Competition, win-lose arguments, withdrawing, controlling, criticism, etc. Listening, collaboration, shared leadership, consensus, group identity, etc. Creativity, trust, support, caring, openness, respect, acceptance etc.
  11. 11. © Operational Excellence Consulting. All rights reserved. 11 Belbin’s Team Roles Model identifies nine team roles that underlie team success and can be used to develop its strengths and manage its weaknesses Belbin’s Team Roles Model Source: Dr Meredith Belbin Action Oriented Roles Shaper Challenges the team to improve Implementer Puts ideas into action Completer Finisher Ensures through, timely completion People Oriented Roles Coordinator Acts as a chairperson Team Worker Encourages cooperation Resource Investigator Explores outside opportunities Thought Oriented Roles Plant Presents new ideas and approaches Monitor-Evaluator Analyzes the options Specialist Provides specialized skills
  12. 12. © Operational Excellence Consulting. All rights reserved. 12 The Job Demands-Resources (JD-R) Model can be used to analyze and improve a team’s well-being and engagement The JD-R Model Source: Bakker and Demerouti Low High Demands Resources LowHigh Low Strain Average Motivation High Strain Low Motivation Average Strain High Motivation Low Strain High Motivation
  13. 13. © Operational Excellence Consulting. All rights reserved. 13 The Margerison-McCann Team Management Profile helps you recognize the roles necessary for your team to operate at its best, and determine which individuals are best for each role The Margerison-McCann Team Management Profile Source: Adapted from Margerison and McCann Explorers Controllers Advisors Organizers Explorer Promoter Assessor Developer Thruster Organizer Concluder Producer Controller Inspector Creator Innovator Reporter Advisor Upholder Maintainer LINKER
  14. 14. © Operational Excellence Consulting. All rights reserved. 14 The Training Needs Analysis (TNA) framework provides a systematic approach to identify gaps in employee training and related training needs The TNA Framework Source: Blanchard & Thacker Performance Gap Person Analysis Organizational Analysis Operational Analysis Non-Training Needs Training Needs Identify Performance Discrepancy and its Causes
  15. 15. © Operational Excellence Consulting. All rights reserved. 15 ADDIE Model is a systematic instructional design model comprising five phases: Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation & Evaluation The ADDIE Model
  16. 16. © Operational Excellence Consulting. All rights reserved. 16 DESCRIPTION Unconscious Incompetence  At this level, you are blissfully ignorant: you have a complete lack of knowledge and skills in a specific area, and you're unaware of this. Your confidence therefore far exceeds your abilities. Conscious Incompetence  By this stage, you have discovered that you need to learn new skills. You realize that others are much more competent than you are, and that they can easily do things that you are struggling with. Conscious Competence  At this level, you know that you have acquired the skills and knowledge you need. You put your learning into practice regularly, and you gain even more confidence as you use your new skills. Unconscious Competence  At this level, you use your new skills effortlessly, and you perform tasks without conscious effort. You are completely confident of success. Once you master one set of skills, it's important to learn more if you want to continue to grow. Description of the Conscious Competence Learning Model
  17. 17. © Operational Excellence Consulting. All rights reserved. 17 Kirkpatrick’s Four-Level Training Evaluation Model can be used to objectively analyze the effectiveness and impact of the training Results To what degree targeted outcomes occur, as a results of the learning event(s) and subsequent reinforcement Behavior To what degree participants apply what they learned during training when they are back on the job Learning To what degree participants acquire the intended knowledge, skills and attitudes based on their participation in the learning event Reaction To what degree participants react favorably to the learning event Level 1 Level 4 Level 3 Level 2 Source: Donald Kirkpatrick
  18. 18. © Operational Excellence Consulting. All rights reserved. 18 Heron’s Six Categories of Intervention – What to say and ask Heron's Six Categories of Intervention Source: John Heron Authoritative Prescriptive  Give advice and guidance  Tell the other person how they should behave  Tell then what to do Informative  Give your view and experience  Explain the background and principles  Help the other person get a better understanding Confronting  Challenge the other person’s thinking  Play back exactly what the person has said or done  Tell them what you think is holding them back  Help them avoid making the same mistake again Facilitative Cathartic  Help the other person express their feelings or fears  Empathize with them Catalytic  Ask questions to encourage fresh thinking  Encourage the other person to generate new options and solutions  Listen and summarize, and listen some more Supportive  Tell the other person you value them (their contribution, good intention or achievements)  Praise them  Show them they have your support and commitment
  19. 19. © Operational Excellence Consulting. All rights reserved. 19 The Emotional Competence Framework facilitates team members to develop themselves in five dimensions of emotional intelligence Source: Adapted from the works of Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence and Working with Emotional Intelligence Self-Awareness • Emotional awareness • Accurate self- assessment • Self-confidence Empathy • Understanding others • Developing others • Service orientation • Leveraging diversity • Political awareness Motivation • Achievement drive • Commitment • Initiative • optimism Self-Regulation • Self-control • Trustworthiness • Conscientiousness • Adaptability • innovation Social Skills • Influence • Conflict management • Change catalyst • Collaboration and cooperation • Communication • Leadership • Building bonds • Team capabilities Personal Competence The Emotional Competence Framework
  20. 20. © Operational Excellence Consulting. All rights reserved. 20 The Nine-Box Grid for Talent Management provides a useful framework for evaluating team members’ talent The Nine-Box Grid for Talent Management (a.k.a. Performance & Potential Matrix) Low High Performance Potential LowHigh Consider reassignment, reclassification to a lower level or exit from the organization. Effective performer, but may have reached career potential; try to coach employee on becoming more innovative, focus on lateral thinking. May be considered for job enlargement at the same level, but may need coaching in several areas, including people management. With coaching, could progress within level; focus on stretch goals for this employee. Experienced high performer but has reached limit of career potential. Still a valuable employee and can be encouraged to develop communications and delegation skills. Current role may still provide opportunity for growth/development; focused on tactical; focus should be on helping improve strategic thinking. Does extremely well at current job with potential to do more; give stretch assignments to help prepare for next level. Seasoned professional capable of expanded role, but may be experiencing problems that require coaching and mentoring. Consistently performs well in a variety of assignments; superstar employee. Big picture thinker; problem solver; self motivated. Medium Medium
  21. 21. © Operational Excellence Consulting. All rights reserved. 21 The GROW Model is a simple four-step process that helps you structure coaching and mentoring sessions with team members The GROW Model WILL OPTIONS REALITY GOAL Establish the goal Examine the current reality Explore the options Establish the will
  22. 22. © Operational Excellence Consulting. All rights reserved. 22 Gibb’s Reflective Cycle is useful for helping people learn from situations that they experience regularly, especially when these don't go well Gibb’s Reflective Cycle Source: Graham Gibbs Description Feelings EvaluationConclusions Action
  23. 23. © Operational Excellence Consulting. All rights reserved. 23 Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs Self-actualization needs Esteem needs Social needs Safety needs Physiological Needs
  24. 24. © Operational Excellence Consulting. All rights reserved. 24 Herzberg’s Motivators & Hygiene Factors Improving the motivator factors increases job satisfaction Improving the hygiene factors decreases job dissatisfaction Herzberg’s Two-Factor Principles Job Dissatisfaction Job Satisfaction Influenced by Hygiene Factors _________________  Working conditions  Coworker relations  Policies and rules  Supervisor quality  Base wage, salary Influenced by Motivator Factors _________________  Achievement  Recognition  Responsibility  Work itself  Advancement  Personal growth
  25. 25. © Operational Excellence Consulting. All rights reserved. 25 The Johari Window is a communication model that is used to improve understanding between team members The Johari Window Source: Joseph Luft & Harry Ingham 1: Open Area 2: Blind Area 3: Hidden Area 4: Unknown Area Feedback Shared Discovery Self-Disclosure Self-Discovery Ask Tell Known by Others Unknown by Others Known by Self Unknown by Self
  26. 26. © Operational Excellence Consulting. All rights reserved. 26 Lewin’s Three Stage Change Process – Practical Steps Source: Kurt Lewin 1. Determine what needs to change 2. Ensure there is strong support from upper management 3. Create the need for change 4. Manage and understand the doubts and concerns Unfreeze RefreezeChange 1. Communicate often 2. Dispel rumors 3. Empower action 4. Involve people in the process 1. Anchor the changes into the culture 2. Develop ways to sustain the change 3. Provide support and training 4. Celebrate success! Lewin’s Change Model
  27. 27. © Operational Excellence Consulting. All rights reserved. 27 Kotter's Eight Phases of Change Source: John Kotter Need for Change Change Behavior Change Direction Change Sustainability 1. Establish a Sense of Urgency 2. Form a Powerful Guiding Coalition 3. Create a Vision 4. Communicate the Vision 5. Empower Others to Act on the Vision 6. Plan for and Create Short Term Wins 7. Consolidate Improvements & Produce More Change 8. Institutionalize New Approaches Committed Leadership Kotter's Change Model
  28. 28. © Operational Excellence Consulting. All rights reserved. 28 De Bono’s thinking hats represents six ways of thinking about strategies and helps us to see potential opportunities Source: Edward de Bono De Bono’s Six Thinking Hats The White Hat - Facts White hat thinking focuses on data, facts, information known or needed. The Yellow Hat - Benefits Yellow hat thinking focuses on values and benefits. Why something may work. The Red Hat - Feelings Red hat thinking focuses on feelings, hunches, gut instinct and intuition. The Black Hat - Cautions Black hat thinking focuses on difficulties, potential problems. Why something may not work. The Blue Hat - Process Blue hat thinking focuses on managing the thinking process, focus, next steps, action plans. The Green Hat - Creativity Green hat thinking focuses on creativity: possibilities, alternatives, solutions, new ideas.
  29. 29. © Operational Excellence Consulting. All rights reserved. About Operational Excellence Consulting
  30. 30. © Operational Excellence Consulting. All rights reserved. 30 About Operational Excellence Consulting • Operational Excellence Consulting is a management training and consulting firm that assists organizations in improving business performance and effectiveness. • The firm’s mission is to create business value for organizations through innovative operational excellence management training and consulting solutions. • OEC takes a unique “beyond the tools” approach to enable clients develop internal capabilities and cultural transformation to achieve sustainable world-class excellence and competitive advantage. For more information, please visit www.oeconsulting.com.sg
  31. 31. © Operational Excellence Consulting. All rights reserved. To download this presentation, please visit us at: www.oeconsulting.com.sg END OF PARTIAL PREVIEW

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