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Lean Poster

The Lean Poster highlights the Lean Management Framework (a.k.a. the "House of TPS"), the concept of Value-added Activities and Non-value-added Activities (waste), the Eight Types of Waste, the Five Lean Principles and the generic PDCA Approach to Waste Elimination.

The Lean Poster comes in two themes: color and blue. Formatted in PDF, the poster can be easily printed on an A3-sized paper.

The Lean Poster complements the Lean Thinking, Lean Manufacturing and Lean Office training presentation materials. It is a useful and cost-effective tool that can be printed and distributed to attendees of your Lean awareness or workshop session. It serves as a takeaway and summary of your Lean Management presentation.

The Lean Poster provides a description of the key Lean Concepts and Principles. It includes:

1. The Lean Management Framework
Includes the five "pillars" such as Stability, Standardization, Just-In-Time, Jidoka and Involvement

2. The Five Lean Principles
2.1 Define value from the customer's perspective and provide what they want
2.2 Identify the value stream or process for each product or service and reduce or eliminate steps that do not add value
2.3 Align the value-added steps so they flow continuously
2.4 Allow the level of customer demand to pull the process, i.e., produce only what is ordered
2.5 Pursue perfection through continuous improvement

3. The Eight Types of Waste
Over-production, Waiting, Motion, Transportation, Inventory, Defects, Over-processing and Intellectual waste

4. Value-added Activities vs. Non-value-added Activities
Value-added activities
Non-value-added activities: Incidental waste
Non-value-added activities: Pure Waste

5. The PDCA Approach to Waste Elimination
Eight-step PDCA problem-solving process

The Lean Poster highlights the Lean Management Framework (a.k.a. the "House of TPS"), the concept of Value-added Activities and Non-value-added Activities (waste), the Eight Types of Waste, the Five Lean Principles and the generic PDCA Approach to Waste Elimination.

The Lean Poster comes in two themes: color and blue. Formatted in PDF, the poster can be easily printed on an A3-sized paper.

The Lean Poster complements the Lean Thinking, Lean Manufacturing and Lean Office training presentation materials. It is a useful and cost-effective tool that can be printed and distributed to attendees of your Lean awareness or workshop session. It serves as a takeaway and summary of your Lean Management presentation.

The Lean Poster provides a description of the key Lean Concepts and Principles. It includes:

1. The Lean Management Framework
Includes the five "pillars" such as Stability, Standardization, Just-In-Time, Jidoka and Involvement

2. The Five Lean Principles
2.1 Define value from the customer's perspective and provide what they want
2.2 Identify the value stream or process for each product or service and reduce or eliminate steps that do not add value
2.3 Align the value-added steps so they flow continuously
2.4 Allow the level of customer demand to pull the process, i.e., produce only what is ordered
2.5 Pursue perfection through continuous improvement

3. The Eight Types of Waste
Over-production, Waiting, Motion, Transportation, Inventory, Defects, Over-processing and Intellectual waste

4. Value-added Activities vs. Non-value-added Activities
Value-added activities
Non-value-added activities: Incidental waste
Non-value-added activities: Pure Waste

5. The PDCA Approach to Waste Elimination
Eight-step PDCA problem-solving process

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Lean Poster

  1. 1. Lean Concepts & Principles © Operational Excellence Consulting. All rights reserved. PDCA APPROACH TO WASTE ELIMINATION VALUE-ADD VS. NON-VALUE ADD 1. Define value from the customer’s perspective and provide what they want 2. Identify the value stream or process for each product or service and reduce or eliminate steps that do not add value 3. Align the value-added steps so they flow continuously 4. Allow the level of customer demand to pull the process, i.e., produce only what is ordered 5. Pursue perfection through continuous improvement LEAN MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK LEAN PRINCIPLESWORK VS. WASTE Over-production Producing more than what the customer needs Inventory Building and storing extra products the customer has not ordered Transportation Moving product from one place to another Defects Reprocessing, or correcting work Over-processing Adding excess value when the customer does not require it Motion Extra physical or mental motion that does not add value Intellect Not using employees’ full intellectual contribution Waiting Employees waiting for another process or a machine/tool Waste § Transform or shape material or information § Customer wants it and willing to pay for it § Done right the first time § No value created but required by current thinking § No value created but required by process limitations § No value created but required by current technology § No value created but required by government/ business regulations § Consume resources but creates no value for the customer § Could be stopped and it would be invisible to the customer Value-Added Activities Non-Value Add: Incidental Waste Non-Value Add: Pure Waste Value-Add Non-Value Add: Incidental Waste Non-Value Add: Pure Waste EIGHT TYPES OF WASTE Stability Standardization Just-In-Time Jidoka Involvement1 2 3 4 5 Stability Just-In-Time • Continuous flow • Takt time • Pull system • Flexible workforce Jidoka • Separate man & machine work • Abnormality Identification • Poka yoke • Visual Control Goals: highest quality, lowest cost, shortest lead times Involvement 1 3 4 5 Heijunka Standardized Work Kaizen2 Select the Theme Plan the Schedule Grasp the Present Situation Establish the Target Analyze the Cause & Identify Corrective Action Implement Corrective Action Evaluate the Result Standardize & Follow-up 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 PLAN ACT CHECK DO
  2. 2. Lean Concepts & Principles © Operational Excellence Consulting. All rights reserved. PDCA APPROACH TO WASTE ELIMINATION VALUE-ADD VS. NON-VALUE ADD 1. Define value from the customer’s perspective and provide what they want 2. Identify the value stream or process for each product or service and reduce or eliminate steps that do not add value 3. Align the value-added steps so they flow continuously 4. Allow the level of customer demand to pull the process, i.e., produce only what is ordered 5. Pursue perfection through continuous improvement LEAN MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK LEAN PRINCIPLESWORK VS. WASTE Over-production Producing more than what the customer needs Inventory Building and storing extra products the customer has not ordered Transportation Moving product from one place to another Defects Reprocessing, or correcting work Over-processing Adding excess value when the customer does not require it Motion Extra physical or mental motion that does not add value Intellect Not using employees’ full intellectual contribution Waiting Employees waiting for another process or a machine/tool Waste § Transform or shape material or information § Customer wants it and willing to pay for it § Done right the first time § No value created but required by current thinking § No value created but required by process limitations § No value created but required by current technology § No value created but required by government/ business regulations § Consume resources but creates no value for the customer § Could be stopped and it would be invisible to the customer Value-Added Activities Non-Value Add: Incidental Waste Non-Value Add: Pure Waste Value-Add Non-Value Add: Incidental Waste Non-Value Add: Pure Waste Stability Standardization Just-In-Time Jidoka Involvement1 2 3 4 5 Stability Just-In-Time • Continuous flow • Takt time • Pull system • Flexible workforce Jidoka • Separate man & machine work • Abnormality Identification • Poka yoke • Visual Control Goals: highest quality, lowest cost, shortest lead times Involvement 1 3 4 5 Heijunka Standardized Work Kaizen2 EIGHT TYPES OF WASTE Select the Theme Plan the Schedule Grasp the Present Situation Establish the Target Analyze the Cause & Identify Corrective Action Implement Corrective Action Evaluate the Result Standardize & Follow-up 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 PLAN ACT CHECK DO
  3. 3. © Operational Excellence Consulting. All rights reserved. 3 Operational Excellence Consulting is a management training and consulting firm that assists organizations in improving business performance and effectiveness. Based in Singapore, the firm’s mission is to create business value for organizations through innovative design and operational excellence management training and consulting solutions. For more information, please visit www.oeconsulting.com.sg

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