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Utilising Open Education Resources in support of curriculum transformation at Africa Nazarene University: a participatory action research approach

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Utilising Open Education Resources in support of curriculum transformation at Africa Nazarene University: a participatory action research approach

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Tony Mays
University of Pretoria

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  1. 1. 1 OER Africa Utilising Open Educational Resources in support of curriculum transformation at Africa Nazarene University Tony Mays
  2. 2. Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world. Nelson Mandela (1918 – 2013) Nobel Laureate, 1993
  3. 3. Overview Context Theoretical framework Methodology x2 Questions, findings, recommendations
  4. 4. CONTEXT Utilising OER at ANU
  5. 5. Context 1. OER Africa has facilitated engagement with OER in Africa since 2008 2. Currently it is engaged intensively with four institutions: OUT, UFS, UP and ANU 3. ANU has experienced increased demand for non- traditional, non-campus-based provision 4. MoU, D. study 5. Duration of engagement 2013 to date 6. Duration of study <2015-2016>
  6. 6. THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK Utilising OER at ANU
  7. 7. Theoretical framework Ontology Determinist X Non-determinist Epistemology Idealist X Realist Positivist X Interpretivist Education paradigm Transmission Transaction X Transformation Transcendence Educational meta- theories Logical Empiricism Critical rationalism x Systems theory X Phenomenology x Hermeneutics X Critical theory x Existentialism/ African philosophy x/ Feminism/ Post modernism x Nihilism Pedagogical choices Particular limited uses of behaviourist / associationist theory; learning as purposeful and linked to outcomes statements providing these are open to change; belief in connecting ideas in increasingly complex ways – from concrete to abstract, from known to unknown Practice informed primarily by cognitive and social constructivist approaches seeking to work towards consensus understandings that allow teams of people to work together towards agreed common goals in communities of learning and practice. While encouraging groups to work towards consensus understandings and work plans, there is need to create some dissonance to challenge uncritical group think; agree that technology opens new possibilities for learning; believe learning should be activity-based.
  8. 8. METHODOLOGY X2 Utilsing OER at ANU
  9. 9. Project methodology
  10. 10. Study methodology • Lead participant – Interpretivist • Ethnography – Autoethnography » Analytic autoethnography – self, setting, others> theory • Data sources – Documents: existing internal, existing external, created in process – Workshops: 4 + 3 – FGDs: 10 + 10 – IIs: 6 + 10 – OER maturity analysis and planning tool x2 – 5 Kenya visits and 1 SA study visit • Analysis and review: iterative reports and chapters
  11. 11. QUESTIONS, FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS Utilising OER at ANU
  12. 12. Questions • What conditions are necessary for successfully mainstreaming the use of OER in support of curricular and pedagogic transformation in a mixed mode higher education institution such as Africa Nazarene University? – What kinds of pedagogical transformation are envisaged at ANU and within what timeframes are these changes expected to be introduced? How does this align with the OER community’s understanding of the transformative educational potential of OER? – To what extent can use of OER constitute an effective catalyst in driving or supporting these envisaged pedagogical changes? – In what ways can a focus on pedagogical transformation serve to embed effective OER practices into mainstream institutional activities and systems, rather than these practices operating parallel to the mainstream? – What opportunities already exist within ANU that can be used to drive this kind of pedagogical transformation and how can these opportunities most effectively be harnessed? – What policy, procedural, systemic, cultural, and logistical challenges and barriers inhibit these changes within ANU? – What strategies need to be implemented to overcome these challenges? – What levels of institutional political support or championing are needed for changes made to become institutionalized?
  13. 13. Findings • Institutional environment for and against • IODL (cross-cutting board but isolated in practice) • Willingness to engage but issues relating to DE model and part-timers • Business model? • OER/IPR Policy, HR Policy, QA, ICT Policy • Changing demand (competition, ICT, cost) • Move to resource-based learning: CAMS/Enaz? • Strategic leadership?
  14. 14. Recommendations • Strategic plan 2017+ • National voice in policy and regulation • Resource- and activity-based learning with varying levels of additional support (and cost) • Business model (market analysis, needs analysis, differentiated programmes and budgets, development/implementation and review/teach-out, data analytics) • Focus on quality rather than breadth
  15. 15. Open ecology OER ODeL OEP Vision and mission
  16. 16. Integrated modelling
  17. 17. OER for Africa… and the world OER show-cases African intellectual capital – allowing us our rightful participation as contributors to the global knowledge economy.
  18. 18. “Education is a human right with immense power to transform. On its foundation rest the cornerstones of freedom, democracy and sustainable human development.” Kofi Anan Nobel Laureate, 2001
  19. 19. tony.mays@up.ac.za Mays, T.J. 2017. Utilising Open Educational Resources in support of curriculum transformation at Africa Nazarene University: a participatory action research approach, Open Education Global Conference 2017, CTICC. Johannesburg: Saide/OER Africa/UP This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License Thank you

Editor's Notes

  • Image: http://www.dailymaverick.co.za/images/uploaded_images/article/madiba%20in%20hospital%20again.jpg

    Nelson Mandela was awarded the 1993 Nobel Peace Prize for his work for the peaceful termination of the apartheid regime, and for laying the foundations for a new democratic South Africa.
    See: http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/peace/laureates/1993/mandela-wall.html
  • Most of my work involves facilitating consensus agreements on the design and implementation model for particular programmes, for particular target audiences at particular moments in time – hence I work mostly in a transactional space (but that does not mean that other perspectives do not also influence decisions made). I have the greatest affinity for systems thinking and hermeneutics but also draw frequently on other perspectives. Similarly, my dominant teaching approach is influenced by cognitive and social constructivism, but it is also influenced by aspects of associationist/behaviourist theory on the one hand and connectivist and neuroscience theory on the other.
  • OER Africa defines PAR as ‘collaborative research, education and action used to gather information to use for change on social issues’. It involves people who are concerned about or affected by an issue and who take a leading role in producing and using knowledge about it. A PAR approach has the following features:
    It is driven by participants;
    It offers a democratic model of who can produce, own and use knowledge;
    It is collaborative at every stage, involving discussion, pooling skills and working together;
    It is intended to result in some action, change or improvement on the issue being researched.
    By its very nature, PAR requires strong engagement with, and leadership from, key participants to be effective. A specific research methodology for the PAR agenda will emerge through specific engagement with our partner institutions.
    Pain, R. et al. Participatory Action Participatory Action Research Toolkit: An Introduction to Using PAR as an Approach to Learning, Research and Action. Durham University.
  • Challenge: institutional lead within a PAR process; own voice and assumptions but tempered by context and feedback on draft documents. Attempts at triangulation through document review, discussion and interviews and direct in-country observation.
  • Because OER allows flexibility in module and course design and in the long-term, cuts costs
    No Royalties; Choose how to share; Freely available
    Allows contextualisation of existing quality resources
    Facilitates conversations about institutional and national policy necessary to support quality teaching, learning and research
    OER is a tool that enables Africa to share with the rest of the world its wealth of knowledge!
  • OER is a powerful tool towards transforming higher education in Africa. This is a transformation that will see Africa take its rightful place as a major actor in the transformation of our societies, livelihoods, economies, politics, the practice of science and the performance of the arts. Africa’s contribution to the global knowledge economy is vital.


    Picture: http://static.goal.com/100000/100084.jpg
    Quote from : http://www.unicef.org/sowc99/sowc99a.pdf – The State of the World’s Children (1999) [downloaded Sept 20th 2014)
    Kofi Annan was awarded the Peace Prize for having revitalized the UN and for having given priority to human rights. The Nobel Committee also recognized his commitment to the struggle to contain the spreading of the HIV virus in Africa and his declared opposition to international terrorism.
    (http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/peace/laureates/2001/annan-facts.html)
    He served as the seventh Secretary-General of the United Nations from January 1997 to December 2006.
  • Description

    Tony Mays
    University of Pretoria

    Transcript

    1. 1. 1 OER Africa Utilising Open Educational Resources in support of curriculum transformation at Africa Nazarene University Tony Mays
    2. 2. Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world. Nelson Mandela (1918 – 2013) Nobel Laureate, 1993
    3. 3. Overview Context Theoretical framework Methodology x2 Questions, findings, recommendations
    4. 4. CONTEXT Utilising OER at ANU
    5. 5. Context 1. OER Africa has facilitated engagement with OER in Africa since 2008 2. Currently it is engaged intensively with four institutions: OUT, UFS, UP and ANU 3. ANU has experienced increased demand for non- traditional, non-campus-based provision 4. MoU, D. study 5. Duration of engagement 2013 to date 6. Duration of study <2015-2016>
    6. 6. THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK Utilising OER at ANU
    7. 7. Theoretical framework Ontology Determinist X Non-determinist Epistemology Idealist X Realist Positivist X Interpretivist Education paradigm Transmission Transaction X Transformation Transcendence Educational meta- theories Logical Empiricism Critical rationalism x Systems theory X Phenomenology x Hermeneutics X Critical theory x Existentialism/ African philosophy x/ Feminism/ Post modernism x Nihilism Pedagogical choices Particular limited uses of behaviourist / associationist theory; learning as purposeful and linked to outcomes statements providing these are open to change; belief in connecting ideas in increasingly complex ways – from concrete to abstract, from known to unknown Practice informed primarily by cognitive and social constructivist approaches seeking to work towards consensus understandings that allow teams of people to work together towards agreed common goals in communities of learning and practice. While encouraging groups to work towards consensus understandings and work plans, there is need to create some dissonance to challenge uncritical group think; agree that technology opens new possibilities for learning; believe learning should be activity-based.
    8. 8. METHODOLOGY X2 Utilsing OER at ANU
    9. 9. Project methodology
    10. 10. Study methodology • Lead participant – Interpretivist • Ethnography – Autoethnography » Analytic autoethnography – self, setting, others> theory • Data sources – Documents: existing internal, existing external, created in process – Workshops: 4 + 3 – FGDs: 10 + 10 – IIs: 6 + 10 – OER maturity analysis and planning tool x2 – 5 Kenya visits and 1 SA study visit • Analysis and review: iterative reports and chapters
    11. 11. QUESTIONS, FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS Utilising OER at ANU
    12. 12. Questions • What conditions are necessary for successfully mainstreaming the use of OER in support of curricular and pedagogic transformation in a mixed mode higher education institution such as Africa Nazarene University? – What kinds of pedagogical transformation are envisaged at ANU and within what timeframes are these changes expected to be introduced? How does this align with the OER community’s understanding of the transformative educational potential of OER? – To what extent can use of OER constitute an effective catalyst in driving or supporting these envisaged pedagogical changes? – In what ways can a focus on pedagogical transformation serve to embed effective OER practices into mainstream institutional activities and systems, rather than these practices operating parallel to the mainstream? – What opportunities already exist within ANU that can be used to drive this kind of pedagogical transformation and how can these opportunities most effectively be harnessed? – What policy, procedural, systemic, cultural, and logistical challenges and barriers inhibit these changes within ANU? – What strategies need to be implemented to overcome these challenges? – What levels of institutional political support or championing are needed for changes made to become institutionalized?
    13. 13. Findings • Institutional environment for and against • IODL (cross-cutting board but isolated in practice) • Willingness to engage but issues relating to DE model and part-timers • Business model? • OER/IPR Policy, HR Policy, QA, ICT Policy • Changing demand (competition, ICT, cost) • Move to resource-based learning: CAMS/Enaz? • Strategic leadership?
    14. 14. Recommendations • Strategic plan 2017+ • National voice in policy and regulation • Resource- and activity-based learning with varying levels of additional support (and cost) • Business model (market analysis, needs analysis, differentiated programmes and budgets, development/implementation and review/teach-out, data analytics) • Focus on quality rather than breadth
    15. 15. Open ecology OER ODeL OEP Vision and mission
    16. 16. Integrated modelling
    17. 17. OER for Africa… and the world OER show-cases African intellectual capital – allowing us our rightful participation as contributors to the global knowledge economy.
    18. 18. “Education is a human right with immense power to transform. On its foundation rest the cornerstones of freedom, democracy and sustainable human development.” Kofi Anan Nobel Laureate, 2001
    19. 19. tony.mays@up.ac.za Mays, T.J. 2017. Utilising Open Educational Resources in support of curriculum transformation at Africa Nazarene University: a participatory action research approach, Open Education Global Conference 2017, CTICC. Johannesburg: Saide/OER Africa/UP This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License Thank you

    Editor's Notes

  • Image: http://www.dailymaverick.co.za/images/uploaded_images/article/madiba%20in%20hospital%20again.jpg

    Nelson Mandela was awarded the 1993 Nobel Peace Prize for his work for the peaceful termination of the apartheid regime, and for laying the foundations for a new democratic South Africa.
    See: http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/peace/laureates/1993/mandela-wall.html
  • Most of my work involves facilitating consensus agreements on the design and implementation model for particular programmes, for particular target audiences at particular moments in time – hence I work mostly in a transactional space (but that does not mean that other perspectives do not also influence decisions made). I have the greatest affinity for systems thinking and hermeneutics but also draw frequently on other perspectives. Similarly, my dominant teaching approach is influenced by cognitive and social constructivism, but it is also influenced by aspects of associationist/behaviourist theory on the one hand and connectivist and neuroscience theory on the other.
  • OER Africa defines PAR as ‘collaborative research, education and action used to gather information to use for change on social issues’. It involves people who are concerned about or affected by an issue and who take a leading role in producing and using knowledge about it. A PAR approach has the following features:
    It is driven by participants;
    It offers a democratic model of who can produce, own and use knowledge;
    It is collaborative at every stage, involving discussion, pooling skills and working together;
    It is intended to result in some action, change or improvement on the issue being researched.
    By its very nature, PAR requires strong engagement with, and leadership from, key participants to be effective. A specific research methodology for the PAR agenda will emerge through specific engagement with our partner institutions.
    Pain, R. et al. Participatory Action Participatory Action Research Toolkit: An Introduction to Using PAR as an Approach to Learning, Research and Action. Durham University.
  • Challenge: institutional lead within a PAR process; own voice and assumptions but tempered by context and feedback on draft documents. Attempts at triangulation through document review, discussion and interviews and direct in-country observation.
  • Because OER allows flexibility in module and course design and in the long-term, cuts costs
    No Royalties; Choose how to share; Freely available
    Allows contextualisation of existing quality resources
    Facilitates conversations about institutional and national policy necessary to support quality teaching, learning and research
    OER is a tool that enables Africa to share with the rest of the world its wealth of knowledge!
  • OER is a powerful tool towards transforming higher education in Africa. This is a transformation that will see Africa take its rightful place as a major actor in the transformation of our societies, livelihoods, economies, politics, the practice of science and the performance of the arts. Africa’s contribution to the global knowledge economy is vital.


    Picture: http://static.goal.com/100000/100084.jpg
    Quote from : http://www.unicef.org/sowc99/sowc99a.pdf – The State of the World’s Children (1999) [downloaded Sept 20th 2014)
    Kofi Annan was awarded the Peace Prize for having revitalized the UN and for having given priority to human rights. The Nobel Committee also recognized his commitment to the struggle to contain the spreading of the HIV virus in Africa and his declared opposition to international terrorism.
    (http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/peace/laureates/2001/annan-facts.html)
    He served as the seventh Secretary-General of the United Nations from January 1997 to December 2006.
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