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Education disrupted – education rebuild

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Präsentation von Andreas Schleicher, OECD-Bildungsdirektor, im Rahmen eines gemeinsamen Webinars von OECD Berlin Centre und Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung am 07. Mai 2020

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Education disrupted – education rebuild

  1. 1. PISA 2018 Results Programme for International Student Assessment Education disrupted – education rebuilt OECD Berlin Andreas Schleicher
  2. 2. school closures in response to the Covid-19 crisis
  3. 3. Evidence From Previous Epidemics Suggests That School-closure Can Prevent Up To 15% Of Infections 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% International travel restrictions Mass gatherings Internal travel restrictions Environmental hygiene School closure Community contact reduction Household quarantine Case isolation Workplace social distancing Source: OECD, Flattening the covid-19 peak: Containment and mitigation policies Reduction in the share (%) of the population contracting the disease
  4. 4. Reopening Schools May have A Different Impact Across Countries Contact matrices for home interaction Source: github.com/sbfnk/socialmixr
  5. 5. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Belarus Netherlands Ukraine Austria Portugal Finland Kosovo Poland Switzerland Iceland Germany Denmark Norway Lithuania Romania NorthMacedonia Hungary Luxembourg Serbia Belgium B-S-J-Z(China) Israel France Sweden Estonia Slovenia Latvia Spain Albania BosniaandHerzegovina Moldova Italy OECDaverage Canada Baku(Azerbaijan) Kazakhstan CzechRepublic Montenegro SlovakRepublic Ireland Russia UnitedKingdom Georgia NewZealand UnitedStates Croatia Australia Greece Uruguay Turkey Japan Malta Chile UnitedArabEmirates Qatar Korea SaudiArabia CostaRica Jordan Panama DominicanRepublic ChineseTaipei Bulgaria Macao(China) Lebanon Peru Brazil HongKong(China) Singapore Argentina Morocco Colombia Mexico BruneiDarussalam Malaysia Thailand Philippines Indonesia % Percentage of students that have access to a quiet place to study Average Disadvantaged schools Advantaged schools Access to a quiet place to study Fig A1
  6. 6. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Denmark Slovenia Norway Poland Lithuania Iceland Austria Switzerland Netherlands Sweden CzechRepublic Latvia Finland Australia Malta Belarus Canada Russia Portugal Serbia Israel Belgium Luxembourg NorthMacedonia Germany UnitedKingdom Macao(China) SlovakRepublic NewZealand Hungary Spain Croatia France Korea Bulgaria Italy BosniaandHerzegovina OECDaverage Ukraine Greece Montenegro Romania UnitedArabEmirates Singapore HongKong(China) UnitedStates Estonia Ireland Moldova Chile Kosovo Qatar Uruguay ChineseTaipei Georgia B-S-J-Z(China) Kazakhstan SaudiArabia CostaRica Argentina Albania Lebanon Baku(Azerbaijan) BruneiDarussalam Turkey Jordan Colombia Japan Panama Brazil Mexico Thailand Peru Malaysia Morocco DominicanRepublic Philippines Indonesia % Percentage of students that have access to a computer they can use for school work Average Disadvantaged schools Advantaged schools Access to a computer for school work Fig A2
  7. 7. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Singapore B-S-J-Z(China) Macao(China) Slovenia Qatar ChineseTaipei Lithuania Sweden UnitedArabEmirates Denmark UnitedStates Turkey Austria Estonia Canada NewZealand Australia Switzerland Indonesia Latvia Korea Netherlands Croatia Luxembourg Russia France CzechRepublic HongKong(China) Malta Italy Norway UnitedKingdom Thailand SlovakRepublic Poland OECDaverage Belgium Chile Kazakhstan Belarus Georgia SaudiArabia Romania Iceland Baku(Azerbaijan) Ireland Bulgaria Spain Serbia Lebanon Moldova Hungary BruneiDarussalam Greece Jordan Finland Portugal Israel BosniaandHerzegovina Germany DominicanRepublic Albania Philippines Montenegro Malaysia Uruguay CostaRica Ukraine Japan NorthMacedonia Mexico Panama Peru Argentina Colombia Morocco Brazil Kosovo % Percentage of students in schools whose principal agreed or strongly agreed that the number of digital devices connected to the Internet is sufficient Average Disadvantaged schools Advantaged schools Sufficient digital devices connected to the Internet Fig A4
  8. 8. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 B-S-J-Z(China) Lithuania Singapore Slovenia Denmark Sweden NewZealand Netherlands HongKong(China) Korea UnitedStates ChineseTaipei Canada Norway UnitedArabEmirates Belarus Indonesia Bulgaria Latvia Qatar Luxembourg Iceland Russia Turkey Romania Ireland UnitedKingdom Montenegro Estonia Switzerland Finland Australia Georgia CzechRepublic Croatia Thailand Belgium Macao(China) Austria OECDaverage Albania Kazakhstan Greece Malta Serbia SlovakRepublic Italy Moldova Poland Ukraine Chile France Spain Baku(Azerbaijan) Jordan BosniaandHerzegovina Hungary Lebanon Israel Japan DominicanRepublic SaudiArabia Philippines Malaysia CostaRica Uruguay BruneiDarussalam Portugal Mexico Germany NorthMacedonia Kosovo Peru Brazil Morocco Panama Colombia Argentina % Percentage of students in schools whose principal agreed or strongly agreed that the school’s Internet bandwidth or speed is sufficient Average Disadvantaged schools Advantaged schools Sufficient Internet bandwidth or speed Fig A5
  9. 9. • 1.7bn students impacted by school closures • Remote learning has become the lifeline for learning but doesn’t address the social functions of schools • Access, use and quality of online resources amplifying inequality • Accreditation at stake • Huge needs for just-in-time professional development • Re-prioritisation of curricula and strategies for re-opening of schools needed • But lots of highly innovative learning environments emerging ! 9 Impact of Covid-19 on education
  10. 10. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 B-S-J-Z(China) UnitedArabEmirates Philippines Qatar Kazakhstan Singapore Albania Russia Thailand Belarus SaudiArabia Lithuania Austria Korea SlovakRepublic Indonesia Ukraine Denmark Latvia Bulgaria Romania NorthMacedonia Poland Slovenia Mexico Montenegro Turkey Norway UnitedStates Malaysia Moldova Georgia UnitedKingdom Panama Kosovo Sweden ChineseTaipei BruneiDarussalam Serbia Switzerland Canada Macao(China) Australia BosniaandHerzegovina Jordan Baku(Azerbaijan) OECDaverage Lebanon Estonia CzechRepublic Greece Portugal Chile Croatia NewZealand Malta DominicanRepublic Luxembourg Germany France Israel Colombia Hungary Belgium CostaRica Peru Spain HongKong(China) Netherlands Brazil Italy Finland Uruguay Ireland Morocco Argentina Iceland Japan % Percentage of students in schools whose principal agreed or strongly agreed that teachers have the necessary technical and pedagogical skills to integrate digital devices in instruction Average Disadvantaged schools Advantaged schools Teachers have the necessary technical and pedagogical skills to integrate digital devices in instruction Fig A9
  11. 11. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 B-S-J-Z(China) UnitedArabEmirates Montenegro Slovenia Qatar Philippines Georgia Belarus Turkey Baku(Azerbaijan) Sweden BosniaandHerzegovina France Austria Kazakhstan NorthMacedonia Kosovo Albania Indonesia Serbia Croatia UnitedStates Russia Panama Poland Singapore SlovakRepublic Ukraine Switzerland Norway SaudiArabia DominicanRepublic Thailand Macao(China) Belgium Netherlands Colombia Lithuania ChineseTaipei Canada Malta Luxembourg Chile BruneiDarussalam Bulgaria Denmark UnitedKingdom Romania Mexico CzechRepublic OECDaverage Peru Greece Iceland Lebanon Italy Australia Moldova Morocco Korea Brazil Ireland Israel Estonia Portugal Malaysia Finland Germany CostaRica NewZealand Jordan Uruguay Argentina Spain HongKong(China) Hungary Latvia Japan % Percentage of students in schools whose principal agreed or strongly agreed that teachers have sufficient time to prepare lessons integrating digital devices Average Disadvantaged schools Advantaged schools Teachers have sufficient time to prepare lessons integrating digital devices Fig A10
  12. 12. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Singapore B-S-J-Z(China) Denmark Qatar Sweden Finland Slovenia UnitedStates Thailand ChineseTaipei NewZealand Norway Australia UnitedArabEmirates Kazakhstan Macao(China) Israel Malaysia HongKong(China) Austria Lithuania Estonia UnitedKingdom Turkey Canada Ukraine Georgia Indonesia Malta CzechRepublic Korea Philippines OECDaverage Spain Latvia Netherlands Montenegro Croatia SaudiArabia Switzerland Uruguay Belgium DominicanRepublic Italy Ireland Jordan Russia Iceland SlovakRepublic Baku(Azerbaijan) Moldova Bulgaria Serbia Chile Colombia Hungary France Lebanon Brazil Portugal Poland BruneiDarussalam Greece Mexico BosniaandHerzegovina Germany Albania Romania Morocco Belarus NorthMacedonia Peru Japan Luxembourg Panama Kosovo CostaRica Argentina % Percentage of students in schools whose principal agreed or strongly agreed that an effective online learning support platform is available Average Disadvantaged schools Advantaged schools An effective online learning support platform is available Fig A12
  13. 13. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Singapore Qatar B-S-J-Z(China) UnitedArabEmirates CzechRepublic Macao(China) Georgia Philippines Sweden Denmark Ukraine Estonia Austria Kazakhstan Russia Slovenia Bulgaria Lithuania Canada UnitedStates ChineseTaipei SlovakRepublic Thailand Turkey Italy NewZealand Croatia Norway Switzerland Australia Albania France Netherlands Montenegro Serbia DominicanRepublic Malaysia HongKong(China) Chile Poland Kosovo SaudiArabia Romania Luxembourg Belgium Indonesia OECDaverage UnitedKingdom Iceland Malta Panama Baku(Azerbaijan) Finland Belarus Lebanon Moldova BruneiDarussalam NorthMacedonia Latvia BosniaandHerzegovina Mexico Spain Portugal Korea Israel Colombia Argentina Peru Uruguay CostaRica Ireland Jordan Greece Brazil Morocco Germany Hungary Japan % Percentage of students in schools whose principal agreed or strongly agreed that effective professional resources for teachers to learn how to use digital devices are available Average Disadvantaged schools Advantaged schools Effective professional resources for teachers to learn how to use digital devices are available Fig A11
  14. 14. Use of ICT for class work is widespread overall, but not universal…
  15. 15. Innovative projects and the use of ICT can be useful strategies to address the current challenges to school 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Tell students to follow classroom rules Tell students to listen to what I say Calm students who are disruptive When the lesson begins, tell students to quieten down quickly Explain to students what I expect them to learn Explain how new and old topics are related Set goals at the beginning of instruction Refer to a problem from everyday life or work Present a summary of recently learned content Let students practise similar tasks Give tasks that require students to think critically Have students work in small groups to come up with a solution Let students to solve complex tasks Present tasks for which there is no obvious solution Let students use ICT for projects or class work Give students projects that require at least one week to complete OECD average-31 Teaching practices Percentage of teachers who frequently or always use the following practices in their class Classroom management Clarity of instruction Cognitive activation Enhanced activities %
  16. 16. Find out more about our work at www.oecd.org/education/TALIS – All publications – Country notes – Videos – The complete micro-level database Emails: Andreas.Schleicher@OECD.org and TALIS@oecd.org Twitter: SchleicherOECD and #OECDTALIS Wechat: AndreasSchleicher Thank you

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