Big ideas in science 2011

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Big ideas in science 2011

  1. 1. Big Ideas in Science presented by Oscar Newman, NBCT EA Science 6-8 Grade Science & Math Teacher Chicago Academy Elementary School [email_address] [email_address]
  2. 2. Introductions <ul><li>Your presenter </li></ul><ul><li>This workshop </li></ul>
  3. 3. Rationale <ul><li>Crisis in Science education... </li></ul><ul><li>National Standards? </li></ul><ul><li>Science Illiteracy </li></ul><ul><li>Solution: Let's Do Science! </li></ul>
  4. 4. Science as Activities
  5. 5. Science as Inquiry <ul><li>But what is Inquiry? </li></ul>
  6. 6. “ The actions of teachers are deeply influenced by their perceptions of science as an enterprise and as a subject to be taught and learned...Teachers can only be effective guides for students learning if they have an opportunity to examine their own beliefs...[as well as the rationale for science standards].” from the National Science Education Standards
  7. 7. Your Charge <ul><li>Your Understandings </li></ul><ul><li>Content Knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Pedagogical Content Knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Systematic instruction </li></ul><ul><li>Familiarity with Unifying Concepts and Processes </li></ul><ul><li>A model of what inquiry means... </li></ul><ul><li>Classroom Activities </li></ul><ul><li>Authentic experiences </li></ul><ul><li>Relevant experiences </li></ul><ul><li>Inquiry as a primarily cognitive enterprise </li></ul><ul><li>experiential, conceptual, attitudinal foundation... </li></ul>
  8. 8. <ul><li>“ The key question for teachers to consider is not What is taught? but How is the topic taught? ” </li></ul>
  9. 9. Practice! <ul><li>Unifying Concepts and Processes </li></ul><ul><li>systems, order, and organization; </li></ul><ul><li>evidence, models, and explanation; </li></ul><ul><li>constancy, change, and measurement; </li></ul><ul><li>evolution and equilibrium; </li></ul><ul><li>form and function </li></ul><ul><li>Does the statement... </li></ul><ul><li>identify a theme and unifying concept or process? </li></ul><ul><li>respond to student knowledge, natural curiosities, experiences, or diversity of students? </li></ul><ul><li>Make a clear connection between math and science in the statement? </li></ul><ul><li>reflect an enlightened understanding of science as inquiry? </li></ul><ul><li>appear part of a systematic approach to science and math instruction? </li></ul>
  10. 10. Questions?
  11. 11. Bye!

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