The Method of Historical Inquiry<br />Why Do We Study History?<br />
The Hall of Remembrance, USHMM<br />Recall<br />History is what we choose to remember about the past. <br />Our common exp...
Interpretation<br />History involves explaining people and events.<br />Historians read between the lines.<br />History ca...
Interpretation and Illustration<br /><ul><li>What is happening in the image?
Which side created the image? Why?</li></li></ul><li>Application<br />Use the past to understand the present.<br />The pas...
Analysis<br />History involves figuring out complicated situations.<br />Break the event down into its parts: Which parts ...
Illustration: Analysis<br />
Synthesis<br />History involves making sense out of a jumble of facts. <br />You can search for patterns.<br />You can spe...
Hiroshima, Japan after the A-bomb<br />Synthesis: Creating A New Idea<br /> Draw your own conclusions: Dropping the atomic...
Evaluation<br />History involves making judgments about people in events.<br />Example: You can examine all sides of the C...
Evaluation<br />You can examine the advantages and disadvantages of the strategy of non-violence.<br />You can judge wheth...
Why Study History?<br />“If a nation expects to be ignorant and free, it expects what never was and never will be.” — Thom...
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Why history

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Why history

  1. 1. The Method of Historical Inquiry<br />Why Do We Study History?<br />
  2. 2. The Hall of Remembrance, USHMM<br />Recall<br />History is what we choose to remember about the past. <br />Our common experience binds us together.<br />
  3. 3. Interpretation<br />History involves explaining people and events.<br />Historians read between the lines.<br />History can illustrate ideas.<br />Speculation means guessing about the past.<br />
  4. 4. Interpretation and Illustration<br /><ul><li>What is happening in the image?
  5. 5. Which side created the image? Why?</li></li></ul><li>Application<br />Use the past to understand the present.<br />The past must engage in dialogue with the present.<br />Use personal experiences to make sense of the past.<br />Examine situations in the past.<br />
  6. 6. Analysis<br />History involves figuring out complicated situations.<br />Break the event down into its parts: Which parts can you identify? Which battle was the turning point of the Civil War? <br />Examine each part. How are the battles related?<br />Try to create a time line of events: Which are causes? effects?<br />
  7. 7. Illustration: Analysis<br />
  8. 8. Synthesis<br />History involves making sense out of a jumble of facts. <br />You can search for patterns.<br />You can speculate: Guessing at reasons for outcomes.<br />You can predict: Could World War II have been avoided?<br />You can make generalizations: broad statements that summarize.<br />
  9. 9. Hiroshima, Japan after the A-bomb<br />Synthesis: Creating A New Idea<br /> Draw your own conclusions: Dropping the atomic bomb - justified or unjustified?<br />
  10. 10. Evaluation<br />History involves making judgments about people in events.<br />Example: You can examine all sides of the Civil Rights issue.<br />You can debate the pros and cons of integrating the schools.<br />You can describe the strengths and weaknesses of the President's policy.<br />
  11. 11. Evaluation<br />You can examine the advantages and disadvantages of the strategy of non-violence.<br />You can judge whether a person, policy, or event measured up to a high standard.<br />Example: To what extent did Dr. Martin L. King, Jr. measure up to the standard of the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and the Golden Rule?<br />
  12. 12. Why Study History?<br />“If a nation expects to be ignorant and free, it expects what never was and never will be.” — Thomas Jefferson<br />

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