Keynote borgatti

424 views

Published on

Published in: Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
424
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
10
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Keynote borgatti

  1. 1. 5th edition of Theory, Methods and Applications of Social Networks. International Seminar "Personal Networks: Methods and Applications"
  2. 2. Motivation • In some ways, personal or ego network analysis has  been poor cousin of full network analysis – Concepts that are emblematic of network analysis, such as  betweenness, closeness, and blockmodeling, are full  network analysis concepts • Yet … – a great deal of network research is actually based on ego  networks – Fundamental processes of tie formation and influence  occur at the level of individual choices and behavior – It can be argued, like politics, that all network processes  are local NOTE: I use “ego network” and “personal network” interchangeably
  3. 3. All is local • Part of the idea of network  and complexity science is  that faraway events can  affect each other through  causal chains – Butterfly flapping wings in  China ultimately determines a  hurricane in Florida • Yet I only interact with  those that I interact with: if  a faraway node affects me,  it is through my interactions  with my alters – My alters mediate my  interaction with the world Ann affects Bill, but only because she affects  Pam, who affects Holly who affects those that  interact with Bill
  4. 4. This is why I like eigenvector centrality • Even though it is a global  measure that requires full  network data … … it is grounded in a principle of  local action • The centrality of node i is a  simple sum of the  centralities of i’s alters (the  js)  – The centralities of the js are  determined by their ties to  nodes outside i’s circle but  that doesn’t matter because  that information is already  encoded in each j’s score   j jiji vav 1  vi is the centrality of i, λ is a constant, aij is the tie from i to j, vj is the centrality of j v(a) = .5/1.7 = 0.29 v(b) =  (.29+.58)/1.7 = 0.50 v(c) =  (.5+.5)/1.7 = 0.58 v(d) =  (.29+.58)/1.7 = 0.50 v(e) =  .5/1.7 = 0.29 a b c ed 0.29 0.50 .58 0.290.50 λ = 1.73205
  5. 5. Clarifying the topic … • Personal or ego networks can result from: – Data collected via ego network research design*  – Subgraphs collected via full network design *Referred to in this workshop as “personal network research”
  6. 6. Objective • Compare the analysis of ego  networks derived from these two  different kinds of research designs – ENRD: ego network research design* – FNRD: full network research design • Given that I’m only interested in  the direct network neighborhood  of a node, can I just use ego  network research design? – or are there reasons why FNRD is  superior even for investigating local  effects? *Referred to in this workshop as “personal network research”
  7. 7. Ego network research design (ENRD) • Sample a set of nodes (egos) from a population • For each ego, obtain list of nodes (alters) the ego  has ties with – For each alter, ask ego about • Ego’s relationship with alter:  are they friends? co‐workers? kin? • Ego’s perceptions of the alter’s attributes: how old is alter?  How happy is alter? – Ideally, ask ego to indicate ties among the alters Mary
  8. 8. Results of ego network data collection • Ego – attributes • Alters – List of alters – Multiple kinds of ties to ego – Perceived attributes of alters – (ties among alters) Mary
  9. 9. Full network research design (FNRD) • Select a set of actors to be the  nodes – Typically a culturally defined  group such as a gang, an  organization, a department,  attendees of an event, etc.  • Collect ties (usually of various  kinds/relations) among the  actors • For comparability with ENRD,  sample egos from full network  and extract the sub‐graph of  ties and nodes incident on the  ego
  10. 10. General comparison ENRD and FNRD Advantage: FNRD • Can answer context questions – how fragmented is the network as  a whole?  – How many links separate egos from  each other along the shortest  path?*  • Have incoming ties as well as out – ENRD can ask ego who likes him,  but is still ego naming the alters • Non‐ties are meaningful – Can model tie/non‐tie for each  dyad as outcome of decision‐ making process – in ENRD can ask ‘who do you not  like?’, but not ‘who do you have no  tie to?’ Advantage: ENRD • Can employ standard  sampling techniques – And so standard statistical  methods • Cheaper & easier to deploy – Can collect richer data – more  ties • Fewer privacy/ethical issues – May improve validity of data *how quickly can something flowing through the network reach this node?
  11. 11. Comparison – cont. • ENRD combines advantages of mainstream social  science data with social network perspective • And many network phenomena and measures do not  seem to require anything more than ego network data – E.g., degree centrality, homophily, structural holes • Or is this a misconception?  Full Network Analysis Mainstream Social Science Ego Networks perspectivedata
  12. 12. What can you do with ego net data? • (if you only have) Ties to alters – Network size for each kind of tie (e.g., number of  friends) • (if you also have) Alter attributes – Network composition (e.g., number of friends who  are top‐level managers) • Testing homophily • (if you also have) Ties among alters – Structural holes – All group‐level network measures (e.g., density of ties  among friends; avg distance; no. of components)
  13. 13. Number of ties • Basically, this is network size – Can be calculated different size for each type of tie, or all  ties combined • Very well studied variable; has been very productive – Health, power, satisfaction • And there is still more to study – Number of negative ties is understudied • how many enemies, rivals, competitors, energy‐drains do you  have? – Multiplex ties • Suppose most of your friends are also co‐workers – Most relationships A—B consist of both the friend and co‐worker tie • What are the consequences for ego? Less freedom? More strain?
  14. 14. Does FNRD have any advantages for  studying network size? • In context of defined groups, concept of non‐ties is  meaningful – E.g., can compare ego1’s number of work friends with  ego2’s number of work friends, because we know many  friends were possible in each work setting – If we want to use no. of friends as measure of ability to  make friends, we want to divide by size of potential  partners pool 1 2
  15. 15. Network Composition • Measures summarizing the kinds of people in a  person’s ego network – Frequencies (e.g., number of rich friends) – Central tendency (e.g., avg wealth of friends) • Measures describing the amount of  heterogeneity in a person’s ego network – Heterogeneity measures (e.g., Blau, IQV) • Measures describing the similarity of a person’s  own attributes with those of their alters – E.g., homophily measures
  16. 16. Network Composition Property of network: Categorical Attributes Continuous Attributes Summary of kind of alters ego  tends has, based on a given  attribute (e.g., wealth) Example: Does ego have  mostly rich or mostly poor  friends? How many of each? Example: What is the average  wealth of ego’s friends?  Measures: frequencies,  proportions Measures: mean, median Variability in the kinds of alter  an ego has, based on given  attribute Example: whether ego has  equal number of rich, middle,  and poor friends, or mostly  one kind Example: variance in wealth of  person’s friends Measures: Blau/Herfindahl heterogeneity; Agresti IQV Measures: std deviation,  variance Similarity of ego to alters with  respect to given attribute Example: Prop. of ego’s friends  who are same wealth class as  ego Example: Similarity between  ego’s wealth and friends’  wealth Measures: E‐I index; PBSC;  Yules Q; Q modularity Measures: avg euclidean distance; identity coef.
  17. 17. Direction of Causality SELECTION Ego selects alters based on  attributes INFLUENCE Ego influences alters to  have attribute Summary of kind of alter  an ego tends to have,  based on a given attribute  (e.g., wealth) Ego tends to seek out rich  friends Ego tends to give friends  money, opportunities for  investment Variability in the kinds of  alter an ego has, based on  given attribute Ego seeks out diversity and  has the skills to manage it Ego encourages alters to  develop unique  perspectives Similarity of ego to alters  with respect to given  attribute Homophily: ego attracted  by people similar to self Diffusion: ego’s attitudes  are contagious
  18. 18. Measurement of homophily* • What we can measure is the extent to which  alters resemble egos • So, can we measure homophily using ENRD  data?  – It would seem obvious that we can … *Actually, measurement of similarity – homophily implies a certain direction of  causality which can only be inferred by other means, if at all
  19. 19. Who do you discuss important matters with? Male Female Male 1245 748 Female 970 1515 Age < 30 30-39 40-49 50-59 60+ < 30 567 186 183 155 56 30 - 39 191 501 171 128 106 40 - 49 88 170 246 84 70 50 - 59 84 100 121 210 108 60 + 34 127 138 212 387 White Black Hisp Other White 3806 29 30 20 Black 40 283 4 3 Hisp 66 6 120 1 Other 21 5 3 34 Source: Marsden, P.V. 1988. Homogeneity in confiding  relations. Social Networks 10: 57‐76.  General Social Survey 1985. Ego network study of 1500 Americans • Rows are egos • Columns are alters • Cells are no. of ties  from type of ego to  type of alter
  20. 20. Homophily at the individual level • Across all alters for a given ego, compute  simple frequencies for the variable “has same  attribute value as ego or not” – E.g., number of alters that are same gender as ego  and number of alters that are not • Define a statistic such as percent homophily Same attrib value 1 0 Tie = 1 a b %H = 9/54 = 0.83 Same attrib value as ego 1 0 Tie = 1 45 9 %H = a/(a+b)
  21. 21. Alternative statistic: E‐I index • Given frequencies, compute – It is just a rescaling of %H = a/(a+b) • Example: Same attrib value 1 0 Tie = 1 a b Same gender as ego 1 0 Tie = 1 45 9 ab ab EI    EI = (9‐45)/(9+45) = ‐0.667
  22. 22. But there is a small problem • Suppose we did know the full network. As a  result, for a given ego we know their non‐ties as  well • Both %H and E‐I show strong homophily – Yet probability of being same gender is same for ties  and non‐ties – IOW, no preference for same gender. Independence. • The result from ENRD data is misleading  Same attrib value 1 0 Has tie 1 45 9 0 45 9 %H = 0.83 EI = ‐0.667
  23. 23. With FNRD we can define better  measures of homophily/influence • Yule’s Q takes into account non‐choices as  well: • Example cases Same attrib value 1 0 Tie 1 a b 0 c d %H = 0.83, EI = ‐0.667, YQ = 0.00 bcad bcad YQ    Same attrib value 1 0 Tie 1 45 9 0 45 9 Same attrib value 1 0 Tie 1 45 9 0 9 45 %H = 0.83, EI = ‐0.667, YQ = 0.92
  24. 24. Invariance property of Yule’s Q • Additional benefit of  Yule’s Q is insensitivity to  table marginals – What if you dichotomized  at different level and now  had twice as many 1s?  • keeping preference for  own kind the same – What if you had twice as  many same‐gender pairs  • but with same underlying  preference for own kind? Same  attrib 1 0 Tie 1 45 9 0 101 151 YQ = 0.76 %H = 0.83 EI = ‐0.67 Same attrib 1 0 Tie 1 180 18 0 202 151 YQ = 0.76 %H = 0.91 EI = ‐0.82 Twice as many ties and twice  as many same gender dyads Yule’s Q is not “fooled” by  multiplying a row or column by a  constant • Takes into account category  sizes An aside …
  25. 25. Homophily: preference vs opportunity • With ENRDs we have information on ties but not non‐ties – We can measure homophily as outcome, but not homophily as  choice • Adequacy of homophily in ENRD depends on research  question – If am American and 95% of my friends are American, this clearly  has certain effects on me • even if this is only because 95% of people in my world are American • So ENRD is ok – But if I am trying to measure nationalistic tendencies, I need to  know whether 95% is more or less than expected if a person  were making choices without regard for nationality • If 95% of my non‐ties are also American, we know that I am not  showing any preference for Americans – low nationalism score
  26. 26. Comparing individuals • With ENRD, can we at least  compare egos to each other? – Some ego’s have higher E‐I  index than others. Is this  interpretable as preference? • In principle, yes – if egos are drawn from the  same population, then … – … significantly higher  homophily score indicates  greater preference for own  kind • In practice, not clear what  “same population” means – People live in segregated  worlds due to choices made by  others • Example: Are male or female  students here at UAB more  homophilous with respect to  ethnic background? • For each person, we measure  homophily using %H or E‐I – Run t‐test/anova to compare  genders • If all students face same ethnic  environment, then significant  difference in avg homophily is  meaningful as difference in  preference
  27. 27. Propinquity • Do people tend to have ties with people who  are physically close by? 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0 20 40 60 80 100 Distance (meters) ProbofDailyCommunication From research by Tom Allen Distance short long Tie 1 10 500 0 10 500 • Same issues as  homophily – Lack of non‐ties  a problem for  modeling choice
  28. 28. Theoretical criteria • Until now we have examined specific  phenomena/measurements we are interested  in – E.g., homophily • Another way to compare ENRD and FNRD is in  terms of the explanatory mechanisms that are  used to understand node outcomes
  29. 29. Perspectives of action in SNA Structuralist In the social production of their existence, men inevitably enter into definite relations, which are independent of their will, namely relations of production appropriate to a given stage in the development of their material forces of production. The totality of these relations of production constitutes the economic structure of society, the real foundation, on which arises a legal and political superstructure and to which correspond definite forms of social conscious‐ ness. The mode of production of material life conditions the general process of social, political and intellectual life. It is not the consciousness of men that determines their existence, but their social existence that determines their consciousness. – Marx 1859 Preface to A Contribution to the Critique of Political Economy Cognitivist “If men define situations as real, they are  real in their consequences”  – W.I. Thomas Success information Actual no. of ties confidence Perceived no. of ties
  30. 30. Information benefits of structural holes • Burt argues that ego2  has an information  advantage over ego1 • It is shape of actual  network of  information flow, not  ego’s perception that  matters Ego 1 Ego 2
  31. 31. Feelings of support & belonging • Actual shape of network may be secondary to  ego’s perception Ego 1 Ego 2
  32. 32. Power • Ability to get things done may depend on the  relationship between actual and perceived  networks (Krackhardt) – i.e., accuracy
  33. 33. Perception and ENRD • With ENRD, all ties are perceived by ego • Therefore, ENRD works well when … • Predicting ego’s own behavior • Predicting ego outcomes based on ego’s behavior • Predicting ego outcomes AND we can assume ego is  accurate in perceiving ties • Hard to use ENRD when the topic of interest is  understanding perceptual accuracy – Can use hybrid designs where the alters are  interviewed about ties with ego
  34. 34. VARIANT EGO NETWORK DESIGNS
  35. 35. Variations in ego net research designs • Limited 2‐wave snowball • Key informant method – Focal individual method
  36. 36. 2‐wave snowball • Get alter list from ego • Now interview alters about egos and the other  alters • Allows us to examine accuracy/differences in  perceptions of ties
  37. 37. Key informant method • We are interested in ties among a set of  people, but can’t interview them – E.g., politicians, celebrities, criminals • Key informants are asked to provide the entire  network from their point of view • One version of this is the observational focal  individual method – Follow key informants around all day and record  interactions around them
  38. 38. Rushmore Chimpanzee study • Julie Rushmore – College of Veterinary Medicine;  University of Georgia • Each of 37 chimps is chosen to be  “focal” chimp for a day  • Researcher follows focal chimp for  entire day and records not only  his/her interactions but also all  other interactions within view • Result is 37 separate 37‐by‐37  matrices – a  3‐way, 1‐mode data cube rushmore@uga.edu
  39. 39. Sample Data AJ AL AT AZ BB BL BO BU ES AJ 33 33 33 33 17 17 20 33 AL 33 42 42 32 11 11 14 32 AT 33 42 42 32 11 11 14 32 AZ 33 42 42 32 11 11 14 32 BB 33 32 32 32 11 11 14 33 BL 17 11 11 11 11 17 17 11 BO 17 11 11 11 11 17 17 11 BU 20 14 14 14 14 17 17 14 ES 33 32 32 32 33 11 11 14 AJ AL AT AZ BB BL BO BU ES AJ 24 26 24 22 0 0 0 42 AL 24 24 24 19 0 0 0 24 AT 26 24 24 20 0 0 0 25 AZ 24 24 24 19 0 0 0 24 BB 22 19 20 19 0 0 0 20 BL 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 BO 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 BU 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ES 42 24 25 24 20 0 0 0 Interactions observed while  following AJ Interactions observed while  following KK Only first 9 chimps shown from a 37 by 37 matrix
  40. 40. Correlations among focal matrices AJ AL AT AZ BB BL BO BU ES EU KK LK LR ML MS MU MX NP OG OM OT OU PB PG QT RD ST TG TJ TS TT TU UM UN WA WL YB AJ 1.00 0.66 0.39 0.15 0.58 ‐0.11 0.36 0.25 0.63 0.18 0.68 0.63 0.53 0.58 ‐0.08 0.22 0.26 0.00 0.34 0.24 0.52 0.27 0.34 0.52 0.18 0.15 0.37 0.21 0.17 0.51 0.31 0.00 0.05 0.14 0.06 0.36 0.67 AL 0.66 1.00 0.62 0.55 0.67 0.06 0.45 0.30 0.61 0.34 0.57 0.70 0.56 0.65 ‐0.13 0.23 0.27 0.00 0.48 0.29 0.59 0.24 0.37 0.51 0.38 0.28 0.35 0.34 0.30 0.57 0.29 ‐0.09 0.06 0.01 0.20 0.33 0.76 AT 0.39 0.62 1.00 0.64 0.47 0.26 0.33 0.54 0.44 0.29 0.51 0.63 0.36 0.45 ‐0.12 0.13 0.32 0.17 0.42 0.40 0.56 0.41 0.28 0.32 0.59 0.25 0.27 0.57 0.55 0.54 0.41 ‐0.03 0.27 0.16 0.26 0.48 0.54 AZ 0.15 0.55 0.64 1.00 0.33 0.36 0.31 0.55 0.31 0.32 0.34 0.42 0.26 0.36 ‐0.10 0.05 0.22 0.22 0.47 0.56 0.52 0.45 0.12 0.28 0.57 0.23 0.42 0.68 0.63 0.51 0.45 ‐0.03 0.22 0.05 0.28 0.31 0.31 BB 0.58 0.67 0.47 0.33 1.00 0.35 0.68 0.49 0.74 0.26 0.65 0.64 0.57 0.67 ‐0.14 0.12 0.47 0.09 0.43 0.32 0.59 0.31 0.51 0.57 0.40 0.29 0.32 0.34 0.42 0.56 0.27 ‐0.09 0.15 0.10 0.18 0.42 0.73 BL ‐0.11 0.06 0.26 0.36 0.35 1.00 0.38 0.56 0.16 ‐0.03 0.16 0.14 0.12 0.22 ‐0.17 ‐0.08 0.40 0.08 0.20 0.25 0.24 0.23 0.34 0.06 0.53 0.10 0.06 0.33 0.43 0.13 0.10 ‐0.11 0.13 ‐0.08 0.20 0.30 0.09 BO 0.36 0.45 0.33 0.31 0.68 0.38 1.00 0.63 0.74 0.19 0.59 0.64 0.58 0.62 ‐0.17 ‐0.14 0.37 0.24 0.39 0.28 0.45 0.35 0.25 0.45 0.48 0.13 0.29 0.49 0.47 0.60 0.38 ‐0.14 ‐0.02 ‐0.16 ‐0.10 0.47 0.53 BU 0.25 0.30 0.54 0.55 0.49 0.56 0.63 1.00 0.49 0.09 0.59 0.57 0.32 0.49 ‐0.20 ‐0.03 0.44 0.28 0.51 0.57 0.58 0.65 0.22 0.33 0.75 0.23 0.41 0.80 0.74 0.54 0.56 ‐0.13 0.19 ‐0.10 0.10 0.73 0.40 ES 0.63 0.61 0.44 0.31 0.74 0.16 0.74 0.49 1.00 0.34 0.82 0.75 0.61 0.78 ‐0.13 0.04 0.35 0.20 0.48 0.39 0.62 0.43 0.33 0.74 0.37 0.16 0.35 0.47 0.41 0.72 0.49 ‐0.13 0.11 0.01 0.08 0.54 0.77 EU 0.18 0.34 0.29 0.32 0.26 ‐0.03 0.19 0.09 0.34 1.00 0.21 0.30 0.13 0.27 0.09 0.10 0.11 0.40 0.22 0.22 0.15 0.10 0.04 0.38 0.07 0.00 0.24 0.22 0.19 0.33 0.19 0.09 0.14 0.30 0.20 0.04 0.30 KK 0.68 0.57 0.51 0.34 0.65 0.16 0.59 0.59 0.82 0.21 1.00 0.78 0.48 0.73 ‐0.16 0.11 0.41 0.23 0.54 0.50 0.67 0.62 0.26 0.70 0.48 0.23 0.40 0.57 0.45 0.69 0.62 ‐0.12 0.10 0.03 0.11 0.68 0.70 LK 0.63 0.70 0.63 0.42 0.64 0.14 0.64 0.57 0.75 0.30 0.78 1.00 0.49 0.72 ‐0.20 0.10 0.46 0.20 0.49 0.42 0.66 0.47 0.25 0.59 0.53 0.20 0.43 0.60 0.45 0.71 0.55 ‐0.15 0.06 ‐0.04 0.07 0.66 0.76 LR 0.53 0.56 0.36 0.26 0.57 0.12 0.58 0.32 0.61 0.13 0.48 0.49 1.00 0.46 ‐0.12 ‐0.02 0.11 0.00 0.47 0.24 0.63 0.27 0.46 0.58 0.40 0.10 0.21 0.27 0.29 0.46 0.20 ‐0.10 ‐0.05 ‐0.09 ‐0.04 0.35 0.55 ML 0.58 0.65 0.45 0.36 0.67 0.22 0.62 0.49 0.78 0.27 0.73 0.72 0.46 1.00 ‐0.13 0.31 0.65 0.21 0.46 0.40 0.57 0.42 0.28 0.58 0.40 0.25 0.28 0.47 0.42 0.66 0.46 ‐0.14 0.16 0.14 0.43 0.54 0.76 MS ‐0.08 ‐0.13 ‐0.12 ‐0.10 ‐0.14 ‐0.17 ‐0.17 ‐0.20 ‐0.13 0.09 ‐0.16 ‐0.20 ‐0.12 ‐0.13 1.00 0.02 ‐0.17 0.18 ‐0.13 ‐0.10 ‐0.13 ‐0.11 ‐0.09 ‐0.10 ‐0.21 0.02 ‐0.04 ‐0.14 ‐0.12 ‐0.07 ‐0.07 0.76 0.58 0.44 0.04 ‐0.15 ‐0.10 MU 0.22 0.23 0.13 0.05 0.12 ‐0.08 ‐0.14 ‐0.03 0.04 0.10 0.11 0.10 ‐0.02 0.31 0.02 1.00 0.39 0.00 ‐0.01 ‐0.01 0.00 0.03 0.03 0.00 0.05 0.20 ‐0.08 0.07 ‐0.07 0.14 0.05 ‐0.04 0.13 0.31 0.58 0.09 0.09 MX 0.26 0.27 0.32 0.22 0.47 0.40 0.37 0.44 0.35 0.11 0.41 0.46 0.11 0.65 ‐0.17 0.39 1.00 0.23 0.20 0.23 0.27 0.25 0.23 0.17 0.36 0.06 0.07 0.31 0.36 0.31 0.23 ‐0.11 0.16 0.24 0.47 0.42 0.36 NP 0.00 0.00 0.17 0.22 0.09 0.08 0.24 0.28 0.20 0.40 0.23 0.20 0.00 0.21 0.18 0.00 0.23 1.00 0.34 0.50 0.23 0.48 0.00 0.18 0.21 ‐0.01 0.23 0.46 0.36 0.30 0.55 0.17 0.25 0.31 0.13 0.33 0.07 OG 0.34 0.48 0.42 0.47 0.43 0.20 0.39 0.51 0.48 0.22 0.54 0.49 0.47 0.46 ‐0.13 ‐0.01 0.20 0.34 1.00 0.77 0.71 0.72 0.37 0.50 0.55 0.16 0.43 0.55 0.52 0.41 0.49 ‐0.09 0.13 ‐0.03 0.18 0.53 0.48 OM 0.24 0.29 0.40 0.56 0.32 0.25 0.28 0.57 0.39 0.22 0.50 0.42 0.24 0.40 ‐0.10 ‐0.01 0.23 0.50 0.77 1.00 0.72 0.86 0.26 0.44 0.52 0.15 0.47 0.65 0.58 0.42 0.64 ‐0.06 0.21 0.03 0.24 0.53 0.36 OT 0.52 0.59 0.56 0.52 0.59 0.24 0.45 0.58 0.62 0.15 0.67 0.66 0.63 0.57 ‐0.13 0.00 0.27 0.23 0.71 0.72 1.00 0.70 0.49 0.62 0.61 0.21 0.44 0.58 0.57 0.56 0.52 ‐0.11 0.13 ‐0.01 0.19 0.59 0.69 OU 0.27 0.24 0.41 0.45 0.31 0.23 0.35 0.65 0.43 0.10 0.62 0.47 0.27 0.42 ‐0.11 0.03 0.25 0.48 0.72 0.86 0.70 1.00 0.21 0.40 0.58 0.22 0.37 0.71 0.59 0.51 0.70 ‐0.07 0.20 0.00 0.15 0.70 0.33 PB 0.34 0.37 0.28 0.12 0.51 0.34 0.25 0.22 0.33 0.04 0.26 0.25 0.46 0.28 ‐0.09 0.03 0.23 0.00 0.37 0.26 0.49 0.21 1.00 0.27 0.32 0.06 0.09 0.04 0.12 0.12 ‐0.02 ‐0.08 0.07 0.04 0.14 0.28 0.40 PG 0.52 0.51 0.32 0.28 0.57 0.06 0.45 0.33 0.74 0.38 0.70 0.59 0.58 0.58 ‐0.10 0.00 0.17 0.18 0.50 0.44 0.62 0.40 0.27 1.00 0.30 0.14 0.35 0.39 0.33 0.52 0.41 ‐0.10 0.00 0.00 0.05 0.43 0.69 QT 0.18 0.38 0.59 0.57 0.40 0.53 0.48 0.75 0.37 0.07 0.48 0.53 0.40 0.40 ‐0.21 0.05 0.36 0.21 0.55 0.52 0.61 0.58 0.32 0.30 1.00 0.25 0.20 0.71 0.59 0.47 0.43 ‐0.15 0.09 ‐0.15 0.16 0.64 0.35 RD 0.15 0.28 0.25 0.23 0.29 0.10 0.13 0.23 0.16 0.00 0.23 0.20 0.10 0.25 0.02 0.20 0.06 ‐0.01 0.16 0.15 0.21 0.22 0.06 0.14 0.25 1.00 ‐0.02 0.27 0.30 0.34 0.20 0.00 0.12 ‐0.03 0.15 0.27 0.28 ST 0.37 0.35 0.27 0.42 0.32 0.06 0.29 0.41 0.35 0.24 0.40 0.43 0.21 0.28 ‐0.04 ‐0.08 0.07 0.23 0.43 0.47 0.44 0.37 0.09 0.35 0.20 ‐0.02 1.00 0.40 0.34 0.31 0.39 0.13 0.18 0.07 0.07 0.24 0.34 TG 0.21 0.34 0.57 0.68 0.34 0.33 0.49 0.80 0.47 0.22 0.57 0.60 0.27 0.47 ‐0.14 0.07 0.31 0.46 0.55 0.65 0.58 0.71 0.04 0.39 0.71 0.27 0.40 1.00 0.69 0.72 0.80 ‐0.09 0.21 ‐0.03 0.15 0.67 0.36 TJ 0.17 0.30 0.55 0.63 0.42 0.43 0.47 0.74 0.41 0.19 0.45 0.45 0.29 0.42 ‐0.12 ‐0.07 0.36 0.36 0.52 0.58 0.57 0.59 0.12 0.33 0.59 0.30 0.34 0.69 1.00 0.60 0.56 ‐0.08 0.23 0.03 0.21 0.52 0.37 TS 0.51 0.57 0.54 0.51 0.56 0.13 0.60 0.54 0.72 0.33 0.69 0.71 0.46 0.66 ‐0.07 0.14 0.31 0.30 0.41 0.42 0.56 0.51 0.12 0.52 0.47 0.34 0.31 0.72 0.60 1.00 0.72 ‐0.09 0.15 0.03 0.10 0.52 0.59 TT 0.31 0.29 0.41 0.45 0.27 0.10 0.38 0.56 0.49 0.19 0.62 0.55 0.20 0.46 ‐0.07 0.05 0.23 0.55 0.49 0.64 0.52 0.70 ‐0.02 0.41 0.43 0.20 0.39 0.80 0.56 0.72 1.00 ‐0.06 0.21 0.01 0.10 0.56 0.36 TU 0.00 ‐0.09 ‐0.03 ‐0.03 ‐0.09 ‐0.11 ‐0.14 ‐0.13 ‐0.13 0.09 ‐0.12 ‐0.15 ‐0.10 ‐0.14 0.76 ‐0.04 ‐0.11 0.17 ‐0.09 ‐0.06 ‐0.11 ‐0.07 ‐0.08 ‐0.10 ‐0.15 0.00 0.13 ‐0.09 ‐0.08 ‐0.09 ‐0.06 1.00 0.59 0.49 0.01 ‐0.14 ‐0.10 UM 0.05 0.06 0.27 0.22 0.15 0.13 ‐0.02 0.19 0.11 0.14 0.10 0.06 ‐0.05 0.16 0.58 0.13 0.16 0.25 0.13 0.21 0.13 0.20 0.07 0.00 0.09 0.12 0.18 0.21 0.23 0.15 0.21 0.59 1.00 0.62 0.38 0.10 0.11 UN 0.14 0.01 0.16 0.05 0.10 ‐0.08 ‐0.16 ‐0.10 0.01 0.30 0.03 ‐0.04 ‐0.09 0.14 0.44 0.31 0.24 0.31 ‐0.03 0.03 ‐0.01 0.00 0.04 0.00 ‐0.15 ‐0.03 0.07 ‐0.03 0.03 0.03 0.01 0.49 0.62 1.00 0.45 ‐0.08 0.05 WA 0.06 0.20 0.26 0.28 0.18 0.20 ‐0.10 0.10 0.08 0.20 0.11 0.07 ‐0.04 0.43 0.04 0.58 0.47 0.13 0.18 0.24 0.19 0.15 0.14 0.05 0.16 0.15 0.07 0.15 0.21 0.10 0.10 0.01 0.38 0.45 1.00 0.08 0.20 WL 0.36 0.33 0.48 0.31 0.42 0.30 0.47 0.73 0.54 0.04 0.68 0.66 0.35 0.54 ‐0.15 0.09 0.42 0.33 0.53 0.53 0.59 0.70 0.28 0.43 0.64 0.27 0.24 0.67 0.52 0.52 0.56 ‐0.14 0.10 ‐0.08 0.08 1.00 0.46 YB 0.67 0.76 0.54 0.31 0.73 0.09 0.53 0.40 0.77 0.30 0.70 0.76 0.55 0.76 ‐0.10 0.09 0.36 0.07 0.48 0.36 0.69 0.33 0.40 0.69 0.35 0.28 0.34 0.36 0.37 0.59 0.36 ‐0.10 0.11 0.05 0.20 0.46 1.00 High correlation between AJ and AL indicates that the pattern of interactions among all  chimps when AJ is present is very similar to the pattern when AL is present AJ AL AT AZ AJ 1.00 0.66 0.39 0.15 AL 0.66 1.00 0.62 0.55 AT 0.39 0.62 1.00 0.64 AZ 0.15 0.55 0.64 1.00
  41. 41. MDS of correlations AJ AL AT AZ BB BL BO BU ES EU KKLK LR ML MS MU MX NP OG OM OT OU PB PG QT RD ST TG TJ TS TT TU UM UN WA WL YB • Nodes near each other provide similar “views” of the network structure • Nodes in the core have similar views of the network – would be good choices as “key informants” • Nodes in periphery, like MU, would see a distorted view of the network
  42. 42. Research Agenda • Interesting research question is  the relationship between  network position and  perception of the network • Previous work has centered  on centrality  greater accuracy • But aside from degree of  accuracy is: what exactly is the  perception from a given  position? – Systematically different  perceptions by Bill versus Holly – “point of view” research
  43. 43. LONGITUDINAL ANALYSIS
  44. 44. Friends named, by week Newcomb T. (1961). The acquaintance process. New York: Holt& Winston.Copyright (c) 2011 Steve Borgatti & David  Dekker. Do not distribute. T0 T1 T2 T3 T4 T5 T6 T7 T8 T10 T11 T12 T13 T14 T15 P1 0 1 4 1 7 5 6 6 6 7 2 7 3 7 9 P2 1 1 1 4 9 10 9 9 8 9 9 12 10 10 12 P3 6 1 3 4 8 6 7 6 5 7 8 8 3 4 7 P4 2 2 3 3 7 8 9 9 7 8 7 9 6 8 10 P5 6 1 4 3 6 5 8 8 9 8 8 9 8 9 10 P6 0 3 3 2 5 4 3 5 5 4 3 7 6 6 9 P7 2 3 3 3 7 7 8 7 6 3 3 4 5 6 5 P8 0 0 3 0 5 3 3 4 4 6 6 6 3 7 8 P9 0 1 4 4 9 9 9 9 8 6 9 9 7 8 10 P10 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 1 2 1 7 4 4 2 P11 3 4 2 6 6 5 7 4 7 7 5 8 7 8 7 P12 3 4 2 3 3 4 3 4 5 6 7 4 5 6 9 P13 0 1 4 4 8 6 9 6 7 7 5 6 7 7 8 P14 1 4 3 3 1 6 9 8 4 2 9 6 7 2 8 P15 5 3 0 0 0 2 5 0 0 3 2 0 0 1 1 P16 2 2 3 4 4 6 4 5 3 4 4 5 6 6 7 P17 1 5 2 2 7 6 5 5 7 5 8 7 7 7 10
  45. 45. No. of friends over time 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 T0 T1 T2 T3 T4 T5 T6 T7 T8 T10 T11 T12 T13 T14 T15 P1 P2 P3 P4 P5 P6 P7 P8 P9 P10 P11 P12 P13 P14 P15 P16 P17 Weeks No. of friends named
  46. 46. Individual degree trajectories y = 0.7321x + 1.7429 R² = 0.7161 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 T0 T2 T4 T6 T8 T11 T13 T15 P2 P2 Linear (P2) y = ‐0.1321x + 2.5238 R² = 0.1069 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 T0 T2 T4 T6 T8 T11 T13 T15 P15 P15 Linear (P15) y = 0.3071x + 3.2762 R² = 0.5628 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 T0 T2 T4 T6 T8 T11 T13 T15 P11 P11 Linear (P11) y = 0.3821x + 1.6762 R² = 0.3897 0 2 4 6 8 10 T0 T2 T4 T6 T8 T11 T13 T15 P1 P1 Linear (P1)
  47. 47. Slopes and intercepts • Intercept is general  tendency to name others as  friends – Gregariousness • Slope is increase in friends  over time • Can model via HLM – Time is L1 unit – Person is L2 unit • L2 regression models slope  & intercept as function of  ego characteristics – Optimism – Social ability person intercept slope 1 1.676 0.382 2 1.743 0.732 3 4.362 0.146 4 2.848 0.461 5 3.000 0.475 6 1.133 0.400 7 3.914 0.111 8 0.095 0.471 9 2.800 0.500 10 ‐1.029 0.329 11 3.276 0.307 12 1.933 0.325 13 2.638 0.379 14 2.581 0.286 15 2.524 ‐0.132 16 2.248 0.261 17 2.086 0.439 high increase low increase decline
  48. 48. Beyond network size • One ego might show no change in no. of  friends and indeed not gained or lost any ties • Another ego might show no change as well,  but have lost all initial ties and replaced them  with equal number of completely new alters  • Need to do an analysis at the tie/alter level Copyright (c) 2011 Steve Borgatti & David  Dekker. Do not distribute.
  49. 49. T1Size  T1 ties 3 T2Size  T2 ties 3 NewTies  Ties added at T2 2 LostTies Ties lost 2 KeptTies  Ties present both time periods 1 AbsentTies  Ties ABSENT both time periods 12 Changes for node RUSS Changes within ego networks T1 T2 How many ties that each node  add/drop between time points?
  50. 50. Egonet changes T1 Size T2 Size New Ties Lost Ties Kept Ties Abse nt Ties HOLLY 3 3 2 2 1 12 BRAZEY 3 3 2 2 1 12 CAROL 3 3 1 1 2 13 PAM 3 3 1 1 2 13 PAT 3 3 2 2 1 12 JENNIE 3 3 0 0 3 14 PAULINE 3 3 1 1 2 13 ANN 3 3 1 1 2 13 MICHAEL 3 3 0 0 3 14 BILL 3 3 1 1 2 13 LEE 3 3 1 1 2 13 DON 3 3 0 0 3 14 JOHN 3 3 1 1 2 13 HARRY 3 3 1 1 2 13 GERY 3 3 1 1 2 13 STEVE 3 3 0 0 3 14 BERT 3 3 1 1 2 13 RUSS 3 3 2 2 1 12 Women Men ------ ------ 1 Mean 1.750 2.200 2 Std Dev 0.661 0.600 3 Sum 14.000 22.000 4 Variance 0.438 0.360 5 SSQ 28.000 52.000 6 MCSSQ 3.500 3.600 7 Euc Norm 5.292 7.211 8 Minimum 1.000 1.000 9 Maximum 3.000 3.000 10 N of Obs 8.000 10.000 Difference Sig ========== ===== -0.450 0.157 Number of ties KEPT Significance for t‐test obtained via  randomization method WomenMen
  51. 51. Modeling homophily dynamics • Suppose blue nodes have tendency to … – Add blue friends over time – Drop red friends over time T1 T2 For clarity of exposition, the  pictures are full networks,  but the point is egonet change Blue egos show tendency to drop red alters T1 T2
  52. 52. Modeling change as a function of  group membership ‐1 0 1 0 7 151 2 1 14 112 20 Chi‐Square 22.25 p = 0.001 Pearson Corr 0.10 P = 0.029 ‐1 0 1 Odds Odds Ratio 0 0.044 0.944 0.013 0.013 12.540 1 0.096 0.767 0.137 0.159 Whether  alter is same  group as ego Relationship improved (1),  worsened (‐1) or stayed same P‐value constructed via QAP permutation test
  53. 53. The NEW ties Num New  Number of New ties 2 Num FoF Number of ties between  New nodes and T1 alters. 2 Den FoF NumFoF divided by max  possible (NumFoF expressed  as a density). 0.3 3 FoF/ T1  NumFoF divided by number  of T1 alters 0.6 7 FoF/ New  NumFoF divided by number  NumNew 1 RED are T1 BLUE are T2 GRAY are in both Making friends with friends’ friends
  54. 54. E0A0 = Null triads (no ties) E0A1 = Ego has not ties but the two potential alters are tied. E1A0 = Ego has tie to one alter; other potential alter is isolate. E1A1 = Ego has tie to one alter, who is tied to the other potential alter. E2A0 = (Brokerage) Ego has ties to both alters, who are not tied to each other. E2A1 = (No brokerage) Ego has ties to both alters, who are tied to each other. T1 T2 E0A0 E0A1 E1A0 E1A1 E2A0 E2A1 E0A0 56 2 20 2 0 0 80 E0A1 6 14 0 4 0 1 25 E1A0 15 4 14 2 0 0 35 E1A1 3 4 0 1 1 1 10 E2A0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 E2A1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 81 24 36 9 1 2 153 Changes in ego’s triads RED are T1 BLUE are T2 GRAY are in both
  55. 55. CONCLUDING REMARKS
  56. 56. Summary • Distinguished between ego networks and ego  network research design (personal network  analysis) • Asked whether there are any  advantages/disadvantages to ENRD vs FNRD  when only interested in ego network variables
  57. 57. Summary effects vs underlying  tendencies • Measurements of network size, homophily,  propinquity etc can be used in two ways – Summary of ego’s exposure to what flows • Function of opportunities provided by environment – Indication of ego’s strategies in tie formation • Choices being made by the ego • Examples – Network size vs ability to make friends – Observed exogamy vs preference for out marriage ENRD FNRD Overall effects Underlying tendencies Consequences of homophily Reveal cognitive characteristics
  58. 58. Structuralist vs cognitivist mechanisms • Some theoretical  mechanisms imply that  perceptions of the  network don’t matter – Information benefits of  central position • Others depend crucially  on perceptions – My behavior is based on  my perceptions • Outcomes vs behavior • In pure ENRDs, all ties  are perceived – Lack of true incoming  ties – Very strong for  understanding behavior – For understanding  outcomes, we need  additional assumption of  accuracy of perception – People vary in  perception accuracy
  59. 59. More generally • FRNDs useful for studying global network phenomena (of course) • But fundamental processes of tie formation and influence occur at  the level of individual choices and behavior – Personal network analysis at the center of the network dynamics field  (or should be) • When larger network properties change, it is because of ego actions • Lot of interesting work to be done on ego network change • ENRDs – Can employ standard sampling techniques • And so standard statistical methods – Cheaper & easier to deploy • Can collect richer data – more ties • Excellent fit with qualitative/case‐oriented methods – Fewer privacy/ethical issues • May improve validity of data
  60. 60. Gracias! Thank you for inviting me! Jose‐Luis Molina Pilar Marques Carlos Lozares and the QUIT

×