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A1 b1 rebuilding professional life

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A1 b1 rebuilding professional life

  1. 1. Rebuilding Professional Lives: Immigrant Professionals Working in the Ontario Settlement Sector Adnan Türegün Centre for International Migration and Settlement Studies, Carleton University Ontario Council of Agencies Serving Immigrants 2010 Executive Directors’ Forum and Fall 2010 Professional Development Conference 1-5 November, Alliston 1
  2. 2. Outline  Posing the Problem  Research Design  Preliminary Findings  Concluding Remarks 2
  3. 3. Posing the Problem  Immigrants and refugees lack access to professions and trades in Canada.  What do internationally trained professionals (ITPs) do when they do not get to practise their professions in Canada?  Exit Option: They may return to their countries of origin or move to a third country for professional pursuit. 3
  4. 4.  De-professionalization: Many ITPs experience de-professionalization through unemployment or work which does not require any professional skills set.  Re-professionalization or professional rebuilding: They may acquire a new profession which may or may not be related to their primary profession. 4
  5. 5.  In the context of re- professionalization, settlement work is a second profession for many ITPs.  Immigrant and refugee professionals practising settlement work are an under-researched population.  What are the personal and organizational dynamics underlying the employment of ITPs in the settlement sector? 5
  6. 6. Research Design  A study of Ontario settlement workers who are trained abroad in areas other than settlement work.  In collaboration with the Ontario Council of Agencies Serving Immigrants (OCASI) and with funding from CERIS – The Ontario Metropolis Centre.  An online survey (August-November 2009) targeting the employees of OCASI member agencies. 6
  7. 7.  In-depth interviews with employees holding a variety of positions, including those who make hiring decisions, at these agencies (November 2009- March 2010).  Of the 228 responses to the online survey, 155 were included in the analysis and the rest were excluded for various reasons. 7
  8. 8.  A caveat: Our online survey is not based on a representative sample of the internationally trained labour force in the Ontario settlement sector.  19 in-depth interviews were conducted among those who responded to the online survey and 6 particularly with agency staff in a managing position. 8
  9. 9. Preliminary Findings  Analysis of data, particularly of in- depth interviews, is still ongoing.  A full report is to be expected in January 2011. 9
  10. 10. 21% 79% Sex Male= 32 Female= 123 10
  11. 11. 26% 32% 32% 10% AgeGroup 25-34 = 41 35-44 = 49 45-54 = 50 55-64 = 15 11
  12. 12. 12 21.29 38.06 20.65 0.65 18.06 1.29 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 Africa & Middle East Asia & Pacific South & Central America United States Europe & United Kingdom DNA (Did Not Answer) Region of Birth Frequency Percent
  13. 13. 13 10.32 23.87 11.61 9.03 2.58 1.29 15.48 16.77 2.58 6.45 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 Chinese South Asian Black Arab/West Asian Filipino Southeast Asian Latin American White Other DNA Ethnic Status Frequency Percent
  14. 14. 14 1.94 42.58 10.32 1.29 23.87 1.94 10.32 7.74 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 Buddhist Christian Hindu Jewish Muslim Sikh Non-religious DNA Religious Affiliation Frequency Percent
  15. 15. 15 11.61 43.23 35.48 9.68 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 Diploma/Certificate Bachelor's Master's Doctorate Level of Education Frequency Percent
  16. 16. Top 10 Fields of Education Number (%) Business Administration and Management 21 (13.55) Education 18 (11.61) Arts, Language, and Literature 17 (10.97) Science 14 (09.03) Law 11 (07.10) Engineering 9 (05.81) Social Science 8 (05.16) Social Work 8 (05.16) Journalism and Communication 7 (04.52) Medicine, Dentistry, and Veterinary Medicine 6 (03.87) 16
  17. 17. 74% 8% 17% 1% Place of Education Country of Birth = 114 Canada= 13 ThirdCountry = 27 DNA = 1 17
  18. 18. 18 0.65 2.58 7.10 9.68 13.55 22.58 15.48 19.35 7.74 1.29 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 1965-19691970-19741975-19791980-19841985-19891990-19941995-19992000-20042005-2009 DNA Period of Graduation Frequency Percent
  19. 19. 79% 21% Pre-ImmigrationEmploymentinField of Education Yes = 122 No = 33 19
  20. 20. Top 10 Pre-Immigration Job Titles in Field of Education Number (%) School Teacher 16 (13.11) Manager 14 (11.48) University Professor 8 (06.56) Lawyer 6 (04.92) Director 6 (04.92) Coordinator 6 (04.92) Engineer 5 (04.10) ESL Teacher 5 (04.10) HR Officer 5 (04.10) Other Health Professional 4 (03.28) 20
  21. 21. 21 27.05 33.61 21.31 11.48 4.92 0.82 0.82 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 1-5 6-10 11-15 16-20 21-25 26-30 DNA Duration of Pre-Immigration Employment in Field of Education (in Years) Frequency Percent
  22. 22. 22 0.65 0.65 1.29 5.16 5.81 22.58 34.84 29.03 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 1965-1969 1970-1974 1980-1984 1985-1989 1990-1994 1995-1999 2000-2004 2005-2009 Period of Arrival in Canada Frequency Percent
  23. 23. 92% 8% Provinceof Arrival Ontario= 143 Other Provinces = 12 23
  24. 24. 24 45.16 26.45 15.48 1.29 4.52 5.16 1.94 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 Economic Class Family Class Protected Person Temporary Worker Visitor Student DNA (Im)migration Category Frequency Percent
  25. 25. 64% 35% 1% CitizenshipStatus CanadianCitizen= 99 Non-CanadianCitizen= 55 DNA = 1 25
  26. 26. 70% 30% Expectationof ProfessionalPractice in Canada Yes = 109 No = 46 26
  27. 27. 27 44.34 12.26 7.55 5.66 8.49 6.6 22.64 14.15 14.15 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 Reasons for Expectation of Professional Practice in Canada* Frequency Percent
  28. 28. 72% 28% ActiveSearch for Professional Practice in Canada Yes = 111 No = 44 28
  29. 29. 29 21.43 9.52 16.67 9.52 7.14 11.90 9.52 40.48 16.67 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 Reasons for Not Actively Searching for Professional Practice in Canada* Frequency Percent
  30. 30. 91.89 29.73 55.86 42.34 64.86 71.17 95.5 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Forms of Active Search for Professional Practice in Canada* Frequency Percent 30
  31. 31. 31 44.12 48.04 69.61 11.76 58.82 57.84 49.02 8.82 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 Government Agency Professional Regulatory Body Settlement Service Agency Legal or Professional Advocacy Organization Individuals Practising, or Trying to Practise, the Profession Employers in the Profession Family and Friends Other Institutions and Individuals Seeking Help from Institutions and Individuals* Frequency Percent
  32. 32. 53% 47% Resultof the Applicationfor Registration Succeeded= 25 DidNot Succeed = 22 32
  33. 33. 44% 56% Resultof the Search for a Job Related to the Profession Found = 47 DidNot Find = 59 33
  34. 34. 34 2 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 2 4 1 2 1 5 2 2 5 3 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 Post-Imigration Job Titles in the Professional Field Frequency
  35. 35. 35 11 10 6 2 3 3 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 2 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 1 yr 2 yrs 3 yrs 4 yrs 5 yrs 6 yrs 7 yrs 8 yrs 9 yrs 10 yrs 11 yrs 14 yrs 15 yrs 17 yrs 18 yrs Duration of Post-Immigration Employment in the Professional Field Frequency
  36. 36. 36 19 7 1 2 2 5 2 3 4 2 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 Reasons for Leaving Jobs in the Professional Field Frequency
  37. 37. 37 20.37 9.26 5.56 48.15 24.07 9.26 14.81 12.96 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 Self-Explanation of Prevention from Practising Profession in Ontario* Frequency Percent
  38. 38. 69% 29% 2% Post-ImmigrationEmploymentinNon- Professionaland Non-SettlementFields Yes = 107 No = 45 DNA = 3 38
  39. 39. 39 40.57 2.83 12.26 18.87 12.26 11.32 5.66 14.15 13.21 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 Non-Professional and Non-Settlement Fields of Post- Immigration Employment Frequency Percent
  40. 40. 40 48.11 12.26 9.43 14.15 14.15 24.53 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 Post-Immigration Job Titles in Non-Professional and Non-Settlement Fields Frequency Percent
  41. 41. 41 41.82 15.45 8.18 5.45 7.27 6.36 2.72 0.91 1.82 0.91 0.91 8.18 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 1 yr 2 yrs 3 yrs 4 yrs 5 yrs 6 yrs 7 yrs 9 yrs 10 yrs 12 yrs 14 yrs DNA Duration of Post-Immigration Employment in Non- Professional and Non-Settlement Fields Frequency Percent
  42. 42. Top Five Reasons for Leaving Post-Immigration Jobs in Non-Professional and Non-Settlement Fields Number (%) Dissatisfaction with Job or Employer 23 (20.91) Transition to Settlement Work 17 (15.45) Further Education 11 (10.00) Search for Better Employment 10 (09.09) Business Downsizing or Closure 10 (09.09) 42
  43. 43. 43 14.84 35.48 18.06 15.48 5.81 10.32 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 Seeking Help for Initial Settlement Needs Seeking Help for Employment in the Area of Professional Qualification Volunteering Looking for Work at the Agency Other DNA Reasons for First Contact with a Settlement Agency Frequency Percent
  44. 44. 47% 42% 11% First SettlementAgencyContact - First SettlementJobMatch Yes = 73 No = 65 DNA = 17 44
  45. 45. 45 39.39 9.09 4.55 24.24 22.73 6.06 15.15 13.64 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 Reasons for Seeking Employment in the Settlement Sector* Frequency Percent
  46. 46. 46 0.65 3.23 9.03 19.35 54.19 13.55 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 1985-1989 1990-1994 1995-1999 2000-2004 2005-2009 DNA Period of First Employment in the Settlement Sector Frequency Percent
  47. 47. First Settlement Job Titles (Top Five) Number (%) Settlement Worker/Counsellor 43 (27.74) Administrative/Program Coordinator 18 (11.61) Community/Outreach Worker 14 (09.03) Other Non-Supervisory Position 10 (06.45) Administrative Assistant/Receptionist 10 (06.45) 47
  48. 48. 39% 47% 14% First SettlementJob - Current SettlementJobMatch Yes = 60 No = 73 DNA = 22 48
  49. 49. Current Settlement Job Titles (Top Five) Number (%) Administrative/Program Coordinator 19 (20.00) Settlement Worker/Counsellor 17 (17.89) Program Supervisor/Manager 13 (13.68) Executive/Program Director 5 (05.26) Other Non-Supervisory Position 5 (05.26) 49
  50. 50. 42% 34% 24% First SPO Employer- Current SPO Employer Match Yes = 38 No = 31 DNA = 22 50
  51. 51. 67% 19% 14% ProfessionalTraining Related to Settlementsince First Job in the Sector Yes = 104 No = 29 DNA = 22 51
  52. 52. 37% 38% 25% Desireto Go Back to Practice in Primary Profession Yes = 58 No = 58 DNA = 39 52
  53. 53. 41% 34% 25% Desireto Go Back to Practice in Primary Profession(Giventhe Opportunity) Yes = 64 No = 52 DNA = 39 53
  54. 54. Concluding Remarks  Respondents place heavy emphasis on the personal, inner satisfaction they get from, and the social obligation they feel towards, settlement work.  For many, settlement work is a “calling.” 54
  55. 55.  By establishing this connection, they make sense of the multitude of investments that they have made for and in their previous careers.  For professionals, occupational identity is one of the building blocks of self and losing that can thus be destructive of self. 55
  56. 56.  In their work with and for newcomers, they find a connection in different forms and varying degrees to their primary profession. 56
  57. 57. Thank you! Contact: adnan_turegun@carleton.ca 57

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