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Bridge Lessons - Intermediate<br />NYU Bridge and Spades Club<br />
Lesson 13<br />Conventions for Competitive Auctions<br />
General Introduction<br />So far, we’ve only learnt what to do when opponents are silent throughout the auction. This is r...
Bidding after Opponent’s Takeout Double - Introduction<br />Revision: the takeout double shows an opening hand with suppor...
Bidding after Opponent’s Takeout Double<br />Recall that 1x – 1NT is the catch-all bid for a hand that is not strong enoug...
Bidding after Opponent’s Takeout Double<br />Option to redouble<br />Redoubling a takeout double shows any hand with 10+ p...
Bidding after Opponent’s Takeout Double<br />Bidding own suit at 1-level<br />Bidding your own suit at the 1-level has exa...
Bidding after Opponent’s Takeout Double<br />Bidding own suit at the 2-level (not jumpshift)<br />This shows about 6-9 poi...
Bidding after Opponent’s Takeout Double<br />Simple raise of partner’s suit<br />Same meaning as normal raise except that ...
2-Suited Hands – An Introduction<br />Bidding becomes a problem when you’re holding 2 5-card suits. As efficient bridge pl...
Showing 2-Suited Hands – Michael’s Cuebid<br />Bidding 2x over opponent’s 1x is Michael’s cuebid<br />This shows 8+ points...
Showing 2-Suited Hands – Sandwich NT<br />When the opposition has opened and responded in 2 different suits, it is often r...
Showing 2-Suited Hands – Unusual 2NT<br />Bidding 2NT over a 1x opener by opponent used to mean 20-21 points. However, thi...
Additional Conventions<br />
Showing 2-Suited Hands – Leaping Michael’s<br />This is used to show a 5-5 hand over opponent’s pre-emptive openers<br />2...
Showing 2-Suited Hands - Minorwood<br />After opponent opens 1M, 4NT shows a good hand with 5-5 or better in minors and as...
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Lesson 13 Conventions For Competitive Auctions

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Lesson 13 Conventions For Competitive Auctions

  1. 1. Bridge Lessons - Intermediate<br />NYU Bridge and Spades Club<br />
  2. 2. Lesson 13<br />Conventions for Competitive Auctions<br />
  3. 3. General Introduction<br />So far, we’ve only learnt what to do when opponents are silent throughout the auction. This is rather uncommon especially with modern day bridge gadgets such as pre-empts and takeout doubles.<br />Also, most new players are confused by multi-suited hands.<br />This lesson will teach you how to deal with these issues.<br />
  4. 4. Bidding after Opponent’s Takeout Double - Introduction<br />Revision: the takeout double shows an opening hand with support for all other suits<br />First, notice that a takeout double does not remove any options you would’ve had if your opponent had passed. However, the takeout double has two implications:<br />You can redouble. As efficient bridge players, we should strive to make every bid useful.<br />If you pass here, chances are you’ll get to bid again later. This is not as likely if your opponent had passed<br />
  5. 5. Bidding after Opponent’s Takeout Double<br />Recall that 1x – 1NT is the catch-all bid for a hand that is not strong enough to bid at the 2-level and has the wrong distribution for any other bid. After the takeout X, however, you have no need to bid 1NT unless you want to. In general 1x – X – 1NT shows 7-10 points and a balanced hand, denying 4-card majors.<br />Also, you have no need to bid your suit if you have a minimum responding hand (6 points) and a weak 4-card suit. You would have had to if opponent didn’t double but you don’t have to in this case.<br />Basically, ask yourself this question: am I happy playing this contract if partner passes me out or raises me? If the answer is “no”, you have the option of passing here without too many repercussions<br />
  6. 6. Bidding after Opponent’s Takeout Double<br />Option to redouble<br />Redoubling a takeout double shows any hand with 10+ points. This sends the message that your partnership has more than half the HCP and either you are playing the contract or you can probably double opponents down.<br />If opener doesn’t have a good defensive hand e.g. low HCPs, one very long suit which he opened, he has to bid 2x before you have the chance to double opponent’s contract<br />
  7. 7. Bidding after Opponent’s Takeout Double<br />Bidding own suit at 1-level<br />Bidding your own suit at the 1-level has exactly the same meaning as if opponent had passed. However, as detailed before, you have the option to redouble or to pass instead<br />In general, if you have a strong 5-card suit, even with &gt;10 points, it may be better to bid the suit instead of redoubling<br />Balanced hands, especially those that lack strong support for partner’s suit are generally the best hands with which to redouble<br />
  8. 8. Bidding after Opponent’s Takeout Double<br />Bidding own suit at the 2-level (not jumpshift)<br />This shows about 6-9 points and a strong 5-card suit or 6+ card suit<br />Jumpshifts after takeout double should be pre-emptive instead, describing a hand with 4-6 points and 6+ cards in the suit bid. If you have a GF hand (very rare), redouble first and plan to jump bid in your long suit at the next opportunity<br />
  9. 9. Bidding after Opponent’s Takeout Double<br />Simple raise of partner’s suit<br />Same meaning as normal raise except that the point range is now 5-9 points instead of 6-9 – after takeout double, it has become more important for your partnership to take a level of bidding away from the opponents<br />Bidding 2NT on top of takeout double (Jordan 2NT)<br />2NT after a takeout double shows 10+ points with 4+ card support (if opener bid a major) or 5+ card support (if opener bid a minor)<br />If you have only 3-card support for a major or 4-card support for a minor, redouble first then support partner’s suit later<br />So what happens to the original limit raise (1x-3x)?<br />The original limit raise now becomes pre-emptive, showing the same number of cards in support as 2NT but with 2-7 points<br />With 5+ card support for opener’s major and a void/singleton in a side suit, up to game with 2-7 points<br />
  10. 10. 2-Suited Hands – An Introduction<br />Bidding becomes a problem when you’re holding 2 5-card suits. As efficient bridge players once again, we’ll put some as yet useless bids to use.<br />Michael’s cuebid – bidding opponent’s suit<br />Sandwich NT – bidding NT after both opponents have bid or cue-bidding one of their suits<br />Unusual 2NT – bidding 2NT after opponent’s opening bid<br />
  11. 11. Showing 2-Suited Hands – Michael’s Cuebid<br />Bidding 2x over opponent’s 1x is Michael’s cuebid<br />This shows 8+ points and two 5-card suits<br />Specifically, if opponent opened a major, Michael’s shows the other major and an unspecified minor<br />Partner can bid 2NT to ask you which minor you have<br />If opponent opened a minor, Michael’s shows both majors<br />Partner jumps to game with 11+ points and a 3-card fit for majors or 14+ points and a 3-card fit for minors<br />NB: Only use Michael’s with most of your points concentrated in your two long suits. This will carry through all the other bids in this section<br />
  12. 12. Showing 2-Suited Hands – Sandwich NT<br />When the opposition has opened and responded in 2 different suits, it is often right to compete with 5/5 in the other 2 suits<br />You have 3 choices – 1NT or cue bid either of the two suits opponents have bid<br />The cheapest bid shows 5-10 points, the next cheapest bid shows 11-14 points, the last bid shows 15+ points<br />
  13. 13. Showing 2-Suited Hands – Unusual 2NT<br />Bidding 2NT over a 1x opener by opponent used to mean 20-21 points. However, this occurs extremely rarely. Thus, modern bridge players have come up with an alternative use for it<br />The Unusual 2NT shows 5-5 in the two lowest unbid suits<br />E.g. 1C – 2NT shows 5 diamonds and 5 hearts<br />
  14. 14. Additional Conventions<br />
  15. 15. Showing 2-Suited Hands – Leaping Michael’s<br />This is used to show a 5-5 hand over opponent’s pre-emptive openers<br />2M – 4m shows m and the other major<br />2D or 3D – 4D shows both majors<br />3C – 4D shows diamonds and an unspecified major<br />Partner bids 4H as “pass or correct” i.e. you may choose to pass 4H or correct to 4S<br />2D – 3D shows 4-4 or better in the majors<br />2M – 3M is the Western cuebid, asking partner to bid 3NT with a stopper in M<br />
  16. 16. Showing 2-Suited Hands - Minorwood<br />After opponent opens 1M, 4NT shows a good hand with 5-5 or better in minors and asks partner to choose a spot to play in<br />

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